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Dance Hall

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NEWS
April 8, 1994 | by Paul Maryniak, Daily News Staff Writer
Councilman James Kenney says City Council should end the "confusion" in the Rendell administration's new system for handling dance-hall licenses. So, he wants all applicants to get Council's approval before they can open establishments that often trigger major battles in city neighborhoods. "There's been some confusion lately as to who is responsible for approving dance-hall licenses," said Kenney, who introduced a bill yesterday giving Council the final say on dance-hall license applications.
NEWS
December 2, 1988 | By Hank Klibanoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
After Midnight, the controversial all-night rap-music club that is desperately seeking a city dance-hall permit, will shorten its hours to meet the city's legal closing time, one of the club's owners said yesterday. Donald R. Welch, whose club at 10th and Spring Garden Streets has been operating on weekends from 11 p.m. to 6 a.m., said the owners had agreed to change their operating hours to 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. "That's the last bastion of offense we have supposedly committed, and it has been removed," he said.
NEWS
October 19, 1994 | by Valerie M. Russ, Daily News Staff Writer
Pedro Gunn got licensed to dance yesterday despite opposition from police, neighborhood civic groups and the "witch" who lives next door. Gunn, whose real name is Lennox Pedro Holligun, has been trying to open a reggae nightclub with dancing on 4th Street near South for nearly a year. He now sells reggae and Caribbean music CDs and tapes, as well as women's fashions, at that location. Holligun claims neighborhood business and civic groups initially blocked him from getting the required dance-hall license as part of a general opposition to the large numbers of young people who use the area as a "boardwalk" and hangout.
NEWS
November 3, 1988 | By Hank Klibanoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
If all they do is stand around and sip and chat and mouth the words to the music, fine. But if the patrons of After Midnight try to rap and reel and rock and roll - in short, dance - when the controversial nightclub on Spring Garden Street reopens tomorrow, the club will be issued a citation by city inspectors. And that is exactly what the owners want. Having been denied a dance-hall permit for their club at 10th and Spring Garden Streets, and then for their Down South nightclub in the 400 block of South Street, the owners have decided to defy the city ban on dancing and seek a courtroom showdown.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2003 | A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Not since reggae icon Peter Tosh sang sociocultural songs of redemption and empowerment in the '70s and '80s has a reggae artist been as controversial and motivational to Jamaican audiences as Buju Banton. By his teens, the Kingston-bred sound-system-DJ-turned-singer made a name within dance-hall circles with a series of explicit hits. "Having success come early affected me positively and negatively," the 30-year-old Banton said. "My music and my talents were exploited for everyone to hear.
NEWS
December 10, 1988 | By Beth Gillin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite an hour-long huddle with lawyers from all sides yesterday, the city's Licenses and Inspections Review Board was unable to work out a compromise in the dispute over the rap-music club After Midnight. Therefore, said board Chairman Alan C. Kessler, the board will continue hearing testimony next week from neighbors on both sides of the question of whether to grant a permit for the dance hall at 10th and Spring Garden Streets. After hearing testimony from neighborhood activist Nadirah Williams, who praised After Midnight for "keeping young people off the streets," the board caucused with attorneys for the city, the club owners and a neighborhood opposition group but failed to arrive at a solution.
NEWS
November 30, 1988 | By Hank Klibanoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
The city's Department of Licenses and Inspections again nixed a controversial rap-music club's application for a dance-hall permit yesterday, setting in motion what is likely to be another bitterly contested appeals fight. Clarence E. Mosley, L&I's deputy commissioner, said the new application filed by the owners of After Midnight, at 10th and Spring Garden Streets, was rejected on the recommendation of the Police Department and because of the "opposition of various community groups, business persons and nearby residents" Martin Pitkow, one of the attorneys representing the owners, said the company would file an appeal immediately with the Licenses and Inspections Board of Review, which has been ordered by a Common Pleas Court judge to hold its hearing and render its decision next week.
NEWS
September 13, 1989 | By Relli Katz, Special to The Inquirer
The Magnolia Borough Council last week sidetracked license applications for a dance hall and a takeout shop, and voted to pay into the police pension in installments rather than in a lump sum. Applicants Jeff Morrow, of Bensalem, Pa., and Clair McShane of Mount Laurel, came before the council on Wednesday for the second time to get permission to open an under-21 dance hall in the former Bonanza restaurant on the White Horse Pike. The hall would open in October. The hall would be open from 7 to 10 p.m. for customers 18 or younger and for those 18 to 21 from 11 p.m. and 2 a.m. The operators intend to serve soft drinks but no food.
NEWS
January 15, 1991 | By Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
A federal judge wants the financially strapped, cash-short city to post a $3 million bond as collateral while it appeals a jury verdict for that amount in favor of dance hall investors. This bad news came Jan. 2, and took a turn for the worse yesterday when U.S. District Judge Clarence C. Newcomer ordered the city to pay $640,000 in fees to the investors' lawyers within 30 days to cover their successful prosecution of the case. City lawyers contend they can't afford either bill at this time and hope Newcomer will reconsider.
NEWS
December 15, 1988 | By Hank Klibanoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
After Midnight, the rap-music nightclub whose pursuit of a dance-hall license became a grinding odyssey between the city's bureaucracy and a federal bankruptcy court, finally won that license yesterday after the club's owners agreed to make some concessions. By a 3-1 vote that came after more than eight hours of testimony over three days, the Licenses and Inspections Review Board reversed a decision it made in May and voted to award the license to the club's owners, Midnight Sessions.
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TRAVEL
May 1, 2016
Before you go Buy a copy of the Milepost , a thick catalog that offers mile-by-mile descriptions of every road in Alaska, plus the Alaska-Canada Highway. This bible of Alaska road-tripping includes descriptions of every conceivable sight along the Dalton Highway and plenty of tips on where to fish and camp and which bad spots on the road to watch for. It's for sale everywhere in Alaska and can be ordered at themilepost.com. Car rental If you want to brave the Dalton Highway on your own (as many do)
NEWS
September 3, 2012
An Eagle and a rock-and-roller While reading the stories devoted to the life and career of the late football Hall of Famer Steve Van Buren I couldn't help but notice that there was a missing chapter ("Steve Van Buren, Eagles great, dies," Aug. 24). Following his sports career, Van Buren had a hand in promoting the love of song and dance for the teeny boppers of the 1950s and '60s. My memory is a little cloudy as to the exact year, but I'm certain that it was sometime in the mid-1950s that Van Buren's Danceland opened its doors in the middle of the 1000 block of Wood Street in Bristol.
SPORTS
June 8, 2012 | By STAN HOCHMAN and For the Daily News
JOE FRAZIER got into a fight, growing up in Beaufort, S.C. Beat the bejabbers out of a guy of the white persuasion. Had ‘til sundown to get out of that hardscrabble town. Headed north. By car? Bus? Train? "He rode the dog," Martha Frazier-Rhodan said yesterday, confirming the story with a wistful smile and a head nod. The dog? "Greyhound bus," she said. "That's what Joe always called it. The dog. " Rode the dog to New York, where his brother Tommy lived. New York was too loud, too crowded, too cold.
NEWS
August 24, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
A funeral for David Nelson Mitchell, 71, of Voorhees, is set for 11 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 27, at Sovereign Grace Church, 111 Greentree Rd., Marlton. Friends may call from 9:30 a.m. that day as well as from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Aug. 26, at Ora L. Wooster Funeral Home, 51 Park Blvd., Clementon, N.J. Mr. Mitchell, president of David Mitchell Inc., a poultry processing firm in Voorhees, died Saturday, Aug. 20, when his Lancair IV-P plane collided with another single-engine plane near Hammonton (N.J.)
NEWS
July 26, 2010
Nickname: Teefer. Age: 30-something. Job: Actor. Stats: 6 feet 3, 252 pounds of muscled flesh. Education: Bachelor's degree in human biology/biological anthropology from Temple University. Straight edge: Doesn't drink or smoke. Back in the day: Grew up with dreams of becoming a veterinarian, but two internships at the Philadelphia Zoo convinced him to go in a different direction. Revelation: "I was put into a church play and it went from there. I learned to respect acting.
NEWS
July 12, 2010
Sugar Minott, 54, a smooth-voiced singer and producer who helped to popularize reggae music, died Saturday at the University Hospital of the West Indies in Kingston, Jamaica. His wife, Maxine Stowe, did not disclose the cause of death. Two months ago, Mr. Minott canceled performances in Canada after suffering chest pains. Born in Kingston, the singer, whose real name was Lincoln Barrington Minott, launched his musical career as a youngster in the late 1960s as a member of the African Brothers reggae trio.
NEWS
July 7, 2009 | By John Timpane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Perelman Theater at the Kimmel Center. A place for chamber music, right? Small jazz gigs? Well, starting on Thursday night, and on three of the next four Thursday nights after that, Perelman will transform into a world-music dance hall, with dance floor, bar, and music to shake your multicultural assumptions to. Slavic soul. Sufi folk/funk. New York Latin fusion. Congolese rumba and soukous. It's called Global Grooves, and the Kimmel folks have been putting on the summer series since 2004.
NEWS
June 21, 2007 | By Dianna Marder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There's no denying that the summer solstice - marked here at 2:06 p.m. today - is a big deal worldwide. Across the Atlantic, Stonehenge is the venue of choice for Druid wannabes. On the Mediterranean island of Malta, the solstice hot spots are the Temple of Hagar Qim and the Mnajdra temple complex. And in the Yucatan, a crowd is expected at the 90-foot pyramid of Kulkulkan, a.k.a. Quetzalcotl, the Feathered Serpent God. But Philadelphia knows how to party, too - and at more convenient times.
NEWS
May 2, 2007 | By Lewis Whittington FOR THE INQUIRER
Choreographer Lisa Kraus isn't worried about selling lots of tickets for the next chapter of "The Partita Project. " Not because she doesn't want people to see it, but because only a lucky 15 or so can attend each of the six performances this weekend at the Mount Pleasant mansion in Fairmount Park, the latest venue of her two-year-old traveling dance-theater "installation. " Previously, "The Partita Project" has been performed, in various forms, at such locations as colleges and cultural centers.
NEWS
November 22, 2004 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
With its Balkan punk rumble and manically somersaulting assaults, Gogol Bordello did something neither the TLA nor its audience on Saturday had ever witnessed - unless they'd been to a Russian wedding. By melding the drunken poetic hilarity of the Pogues with a gypsy blend of accordion-pumping, violin-sawing cabaret, the band's insistently moving fusion brought the audience to a folk/pogo-dancing froth. The East Village ensemble - with twirling female dancers dressed like extras from Oliver and a hyper fiddler (Sergei Riabtsev)
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