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Dance

NEWS
April 20, 1987 | By Roy H. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer (Inquirer staff writer Bridgett M. Davis contributed to this article.)
It was Easter Sunday, not Christmas Day - nonetheless it was the Cabbage Patch that was king. The homely, adoptable doll that spurred shopping riots four years ago is now the name of a new dance craze that was all the rage yesterday at the second annual, city-sponsored "Philly Teens Easter Sunday Parade and Dance," at Memorial Hall in Fairmount Park. Everybody was doing it from tiny toddlers to long-limbed teenagers. Taherra Horsey and Jamal Turnquest, both 3 and of Philadelphia, were crowd pleasers indeed as they rocked from side to side and shifted their shoulders in a movement that was unmistakably the Cabbage Patch.
NEWS
August 17, 1989 | By Cynthia Henry, Inquirer Staff Writer
The New Hope Arts Commission is bringing together theater, music and dance for a five-week Festival of the Performing Arts beginning next week. The showcase, funded by $13,000 in local and state grants, includes two plays, a guitar and flute duet, dance, choruses and cabaret performances. The festival opens Aug. 25 with I Don't Want to Be Zelda Anymore, Marty Martin's play about Zelda Fitzgerald, the eccentric wife of author F. Scott Fitzgerald. Margie Bolding, an Alabama actress, portrays Zelda, a role she originated in New Hope in 1983.
NEWS
June 24, 2011 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
In one 30-minute dance, during which even the cock of an eyebrow is choreographed, Shruti Iyer pleaded with an ancient god. The 17-year-old West Chester East High School graduate moved about on stage to music made by musicians from India. "She is entering into a beautiful temple and saying, 'Show me who you are. I've come all this way to see you,' " explained Iyer's dance teacher, Viji Rao. The number was the centerpiece of Iyer's two-hour solo debut as an Indian classical dancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1995 | By Nancy Heller, FOR THE INQUIRER
The music of Jimi Hendrix and Ludwig van Beethoven, a long red wig and a pair of boxing gloves - these wildly contrasting elements are featured in the intriguing, puzzling concert by Truus Bronkhorst, veteran Dutch modern dancer and choreographer. Her appearance at the Harold Prince Theatre, with a final performance tomorrow, is part of the U.S.-Netherlands Touring and Exchange Project. On one level, this hour-long series of vignettes deals straightforwardly with hot-button political issues such as violence and sexuality.
NEWS
May 28, 2011 | By JULIE SHAW, shawj@phillynews.com 215-854-2592
"Reduce, reuse and recycle" never sounded more hip and sexy. The lyrics, on a CD recorded last year by students with SEAMAAC's Hip Hop Heritage program, are part of a song, "Goin' Green," in which one student rapped in Indonesian and another sang in English about the environment. Yeah, that's right. A rap song about the environment. The hip-hop program is fun, but it's not all games. Besides break-dancing, some students learn how to write and record songs, as demonstrated by the "Hip Hop Heritage: The Album Vol. 1" CD, which includes "Goin' Green.
SPORTS
January 8, 1996 | by Lynn Zinser, Daily News Sports Writer
"Neon" had been a little dim. "Prime Time" was suffering a serious ratings swoon. In nine games as a Dallas Cowboy after signing his eye-popping contract, Deion Sanders had the statistics of someone with far fewer television commercials: two interceptions, two catches, no touchdowns. So yesterday against the Eagles, in his first playoff game since helping San Francisco to a Super Bowl victory a year ago, Sanders became a show-stopper once again. He touched the ball on offense and scored, going 21 yards after changing directions on a reverse.
SPORTS
January 25, 1995 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Deion Sanders, who generally hid from reporters during the Atlanta Braves' postseason games in 1993, reveled in his first Super Bowl interview yesterday. Wearing a Nike baseball cap backward and upside down, Sanders offered his opinions on a variety of subjects: On suggestions that he doesn't like hard-hitting football: "I don't like to tackle. . . . Who does? I like to break up passes, intercept balls and dance. " On his penchant for flashy jewelry: "When I was growing up in Fort Myers, the drug dealers used to dress that way and the young kids looked up to them.
NEWS
March 25, 1998 | By Rebecca Koffman
As I scrape away at the stubborn egg on last night's omelette pan, I listen to Margaret Atwood on National Public Radio describe the narrative struggle. Envy is a terrible thing. I often listen to NPR when I wash the dishes. This vicarious participation in local politics and literary chit-chat helps me through the dead time. A few weeks ago, I tuned in just in time to catch the dying phrase "700 days until the millennium. " Seven hundred days, I think over and over; I must use them well.
LIVING
January 13, 1995 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
Hearing a pleasing word is a celebration. We can repeat it and keep it in mind to trot out when our spirits need lifting. As Heather, 9, dances to music, she will sing the words that make her laugh. "Bubble" takes her fancy and so does "hello. " Because she is severely mentally retarded, it is always a cause for rejoicing when Heather learns a new word. Though she doesn't speak in sentences, she can communicate her wishes and needs in other ways. She'll climb on a lap, point to her chin, and say "baby.
NEWS
September 22, 2004 | By ELMER SMITH
THEY WERE doing the monkey dance around the still-sizzling corpse of Dan Rather's career yesterday. It was like that scene from "The Wizard of Oz" where the apes leaped gleefully as the Wicked Witch of the West fizzled into oblivion. Between conservative talk-radio hosts and acid-penned bloggers, it was a confirmation ball for people who believe the major media are willing tools of the liberal establishment. Rather, who will be 73 soon, is in the stretch run of a mostly distinguished career.
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