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Dance

NEWS
September 9, 2015 | Ellen Dunkel, The Philadelphia Inquirer
This fall looks to be an exciting one for dance in Philadelphia. It's year X for BalletX, as the troupe turns 10. Pennsylvania Ballet opens its action-packed first full season under artistic director Angel Corella. After 32 years at the Annenberg Center, Dance Affiliates is relocating its programming to Center City's Prince Theater with a new series, NextMove. Meanwhile, the Annenberg rebuilds its dance presence as Annenberg Center Live. Starting in October, Bryn Mawr Performing Arts Series presents a season-long festival celebrating Trisha Brown, honoring the postmodern choreographer and company director, whose work has rarely been seen in Philadelphia, with performances, lectures and classes.
NEWS
September 6, 2015
AS THE director of content and programming for the World Meeting of Families, Mary Beth Yount is responsible for planning the speakers at the World Meeting's congress (the 4-day pre-Pope gathering at the Convention Center) as well as the lineup at the Festival of Families and the papal mass on the Parkway. Yount, a mother of four from Media who is an assistant professor of theology at Neumann University, recently spoke with Stephanie Farr about her big gets for the congress, some of the criticisms that organizers have faced and how she got a group of nuns to host a dance party.
NEWS
August 31, 2015 | By Merilyn Jackson, For The Inquirer
BERLIN - Approaching 75, choreographer Lucinda Childs carries her dancer's body regally. Her high cheekbones and upturned collars reinforce the queenly effect. But though she's a grand dame of American dance across Europe, her work has been more or less on hiatus in the United States until recently. Childs divides her time between Paris and the world, her current company based in New York and at least two revival projects touring regularly. Philadelphia saw her seminal Dance , created in 1979 with composer Philip Glass and artist Sol LeWitt, at the 2010 Fringe Festival.
NEWS
August 14, 2015 | By Ellen Dunkel, Inquirer Staff Writer
The show is called So You Think You Can Dance , but Virgil Gadson, who on Monday made its top 10, doesn't need proof. Gadson, 28, from Philadelphia, has already been on Broadway, in the 2013 musical After Midnight . He was nominated for an Astaire Award for outstanding male dancer in a Broadway show. He was in commercials for the NFL. Nor is this his first stint on reality TV. Gadson, who grew up in Mount Airy, attended Overbrook High School, and graduated from Martin Luther King High School, made it to "the green mile," the final audition phase, on Season 8 of SYTYCD . And he and his Philly crew, Phresh Select, danced on the second season of America's Best Dance Crew in 2008, finishing seventh.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2015 | By Merilyn Jackson, For The Inquirer
A wide range of styles typifies the annual Come Together Festival, opening Wednesday at Suzanne Roberts Theatre. The brainchild of Roni Koresh and brother Alon, the festival began in 2013 and has expanded rapidly, jumping from 26 companies presented last year to 33 this year. That includes a few out-of-towners: 10 Hairy Legs (Highland Park, N.J.), Ballet Inc. (New York), and Donald Byrd's Seattle-based Spectrum Dance Theater. Byrd has achieved international visibility for his creation of the Harlem Nutcracker and his choreography for the Broadway smash The Color Purple . In between rehearsals and coffees in the caf├ęs surrounding his Rittenhouse Street studio, Roni Koresh stopped to chat about the festival.
NEWS
July 10, 2015 | BY RANDALL BALMER
AMID ALL the overheated rhetoric surrounding the Supreme Court's decision legalizing same-sex marriages across the nation, evangelicals have alternated between defiance and a kind of martyrdom. "It's time to be a light in these dark times," Jim Daly, president of Focus on the Family, said. Franklin Graham declared that the court was "endorsing sin" and that God's "decisions are not subject to review or revision by any man-made court. " Echoing many other conservatives, Graham went on to say that churches and others who oppose same-sex marriage would be subject to discrimination and persecution.
NEWS
July 5, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Karen Warrington is anything but a shrinking violet. She resists categories. Early on, back in the 1950s and 1960s, she studied dance with Sydney King and then became a member of Arthur Hall's Afro American Dance Ensemble. Always interested in writing and communication and politics, she moved into journalism, becoming news director for WDAS radio, and has been an off-and-on reporter and talk host on black radio in the city for nearly 40 years. From 1984 to 1992, she was press secretary for Mayor W. Wilson Goode.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2015 | By Merilyn Jackson, For The Inquirer
Would you know the moment when you must flee your homeland? Where do you think is the safest place to go? What do you do once you find it isn't a welcoming haven? How do you navigate the roadblocks of immigration, citizenship, language? These are questions choreographer Silvana Cardell and artist/sculptor Jennifer Baker asked themselves and their collaborators a year ago when they began work on Supper, People on the Move . The multimedia project runs Thursday through Sunday in Crane Arts' Icebox space, with a free simulcast Friday evening on Independence Mall.
NEWS
June 23, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Along with the pomp and pride that comes with hosting the 2016 Democratic National Convention, there's an underside for Philadelphia: begging Congress for money. Since 9/11, federal lawmakers have set aside $100 million every four years to help cover security costs for the cities hosting the national party conventions, but only after overcoming resistance from those who balk at laying out taxpayer money for lavish political rallies. The wrangling in those fights provides a window into how pet causes creep onto the federal tab - often as footnotes in larger and more pressing bills.
NEWS
June 7, 2015 | By Merilyn Jackson, For The Inquirer
Anonymous Bodies is an arts collective founded in Philadelphia a decade ago by Kate Watson-Wallace and Jaamil Olawale Kosoko. Although very successful here - Watson-Wallace was a Pew Fellow - the two moved the collective to Brooklyn. I worry that's a reversal of the trend of New York artists moving to Philadelphia, but this weekend at least, the group makes a hometown appearance at FringeArts in Mash Up Body . Watson-Wallace had the small audience seated around the perimeter of the stage and left a few seats strategically empty.
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