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LIVING
April 26, 1987 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Staff Writer
Each year, the Metropolitan Museum's Costume Institute, under the aegis of fashion doyenne Diana Vreeland, mounts a 10-month show that often has a direct influence on contemporary clothing. Vreeland, the former editor of Vogue and Harper's Bazaar, is known for being a powerfully prescient muse in these matters. The current exhibit, "Dance," has proved to be no exception. Even before the Met show opened in Manhattan in December, miles of tulle and pouf dance skirts had been introduced for spring in Europe and New York.
NEWS
October 18, 1991 | by Janet Anderson, Daily News Dance Critic
It's a day like any day for dancers in the 1990s, filled with sexism, racism, AIDS, physical challenges - and unrequited love. Or so Marla Blakey's one-act play, "The Dancers," which received its first local performance last night at the Society Hill Playhouse, would have us believe. There is a fascination with dancers' backstage life and training that sometimes seems to far exceed interest in their on-stage performances. People apparently can't get enough of the suffering and deprivation, yet rarely ask why dancers willingly, even happily, pursue such an arduous life.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2000 | By Merilyn Jackson, FOR THE INQUIRER
Philadanco's Wednesday opening-night concert proved there are at least three reasons to go: the dancers, the dancers, and the dancers. The company wraps up its 30th-anniversary season at the Prince Music Theater through . On the Shoulders of Our Ancestors is billed as an evening-length work, but it is really a loose suite of four works held together by screened excerpts from a television documentary to run next year on PBS, Free to Dance....
NEWS
March 26, 2003 | By Miriam Seidel FOR THE INQUIRER
Filmmaker Maya Deren had completed only a few short films when she died at 44 of a brain hemorrhage in 1961. But her small body of work is recognized for its dreamlike power, and she is considered one of the most important avant-garde filmmakers ever. A new documentary about Deren, In the Mirror of Maya Deren, by Martina Kudl?cek, is the centerpiece of a film series at the Prince Music Theater this weekend. "Motion Pictures: A Moving Collaboration Between Filmmakers and Dancers" will screen a number of films featuring dancers.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2002 | By Merilyn Jackson FOR THE INQUIRER
Benjamin Franklin may have harnessed electricity in Philadelphia, but for the audience at the Annenberg Center for the Arts Thursday night, Grupo Corpo Brazilian Dance Theater embodied it. Grupo Corpo commissioned Philip Glass and Uakti (wah-kee-chi), the renowned Brazilian ensemble that makes its own instruments, to create the opening work Seven or Eight Pieces for a Ballet. Evoking rivers of the Amazon basin, it has since been recorded on the CD Aguas da Amazonia (Point Music)
NEWS
November 18, 2002 | By Merilyn Jackson FOR THE INQUIRER
Four years ago, Gin MacCallum appeared like an apparition in a solo performance choreographed and performed by her - a diminutive tornado of movement, surefootedly destroying any doubts that might lie in her path about her talent. In her first full-length choreography, "In the Shape of a Spider," performed over the weekend at Christ Church, the surefootedness was still there and so was the choreography for her strong soloists, but she was not so successful in massing her group of six unevenly matched dancers.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 1987 | By Patricia O'Haire, New York Daily News
Tommy Tune didn't want any dancers for the cast of his newest Broadway project, Stepping Out, even though Tune is a dancer and choreographer himself, and even though the play is about dancing. The play, which has been running for several years in London and opens here tonight, is about a group of people - eight women and one man - who get together one night a week for a tap-dancing class. It's a sort of social event for them, besides being a way of getting in shape. "It was very important that they not know how to tap," Tune said the other day, his first day off almost since rehearsals began early last month.
NEWS
July 25, 2004 | By Wendy Walker INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Dance teachers normally don't need to worry about thunderstorms. But Jane Roosevelt, founder of Longwood Performing Arts, does. For the last four years, her students have put on a free outdoor dance recital at the pavilion in Anson B. Nixon Park in Kennett Square. "There is nothing like dancing outside," she said. "The backdrop of the trees and the lake is unbelievable. . . . It's a perfect place. " Dancer Caroline Pennartz, 18, said she enjoys having the audience so close.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2004 | By Merilyn Jackson FOR THE INQUIRER
When the Australian Dance Theater came to Dance Celebration at Annenberg Center in 2002, a longshoremen's strike held up its set on the West Coast. This week, Homeland Security officials were holding the Sydney Dance Company's set for artistic director Graeme Murphy's eagerly awaited American premiere of Ellipse. It sat for two weeks on a New York dock waiting to be X-rayed until a senatorial phone call released it - not in time, though, for Thursday night's opening show. But while we might have been protected from an Aussie attack by set, we were not safe from their attaque by dance.
NEWS
March 19, 2009 | By Merilyn Jackson FOR THE INQUIRER
The 16 dance numbers in the 2009 Garden State Dance Festival's two-weekend run at Rutgers-Camden's Walter K. Gordon Theater offer a kaleidoscopic glimpse of what emerging dancers can do when matched with established choreographers. Several of the works in last weekend's opener were highly polished, mobile - and as colorful as stained glass. They ranged in genres from ballet to boogie, pas de deux to large ensemble. Among the best works - and repeating tomorrow - is Camille A. Brown's excerpt from her larger one-woman piece, The Evolution of a Secured Feminine.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2015 | By Nancy G. Heller, For The Inquirer
  Once again, BalletX has delivered on its promise to present challenging new work performed by top-notch dancers. The troupe's winter series, which premiered Wednesday, consists of four pieces - including world, national, and company premieres - by choreographers from the United States, the Philippines, and Spain. The evening's emotional high point was "Triptych," by Val Caniparoli. Inspired by photos of British soldiers who served in Afghanistan, the dancers leap, crawl, and occasionally execute stylized military movements, first to contemplative string music by Alexander Balanescu, then to John Tavener's increasingly frantic score.
NEWS
February 15, 2015 | By Ellen Dunkel, Inquirer Staff Writer
The dance is Polynesian and contemporary; the story is from New Zealand's history, yet the themes are familiar. You could cut-and-paste in many people's stories, but for Neil Ieremia, the Samoan-New Zealander artistic director of the company Black Grace from New Zealand, the struggle is for Pacific Islanders. The company opened a run Thursday night at the Annenberg Center, presented by Dance Celebration. In his "Gathering Clouds," Ieremia speaks of a Tongan Christian priest arrested for overstaying his welcome, of 30 percent of the population filling 80 percent of the jail spots, of getting teased for the shape of his eyes, of new immigrants holding on to traditional songs and dances, and of their children trying to assimilate.
REAL_ESTATE
February 8, 2015 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
When it comes to Philadanco, the award-winning dance company she created back in 1970, Joan Myers Brown is all focus. Fervor for the company, she acknowledges, has been second only to her delight in family. "My home, well, it's a good place to kick off my shoes and relax. But it's nothing fancy. " What her University City home is, however, is a warm and welcoming place that has brought Brown back from her years of rearing children in the suburbs to a more urban existence.
NEWS
January 18, 2015 | By Merilyn Jackson, For The Inquirer
The Rosie Herrera Dance Theatre brought some much-needed Miami heat Thursday night to Dance Celebration at the Annenberg Center. The Philadelphia premieres of Herrera's Dining Alone and Various Stages of Drowning: A Cabaret also provided a few good laughs along with some puzzling and thought-provoking moments. Both shared oblique historical and political references and autobiographical material. Herrera's father, a Cuban émigré to Miami, had been both a baker and a waiter.
NEWS
January 13, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
LIKE SO MANY churches that have closed in recent years, South Philly's massive Shiloh Baptist Church, built in 1870, has a small congregation burdened with huge repair bills, which is not a recipe for survival. But the Victorian-era church on Christian Street near 21st, one of the city's oldest African-American Baptist congregations, found two unlikely Earth angels. Shiloh Baptist rents its soaring second-floor spaces to Brat Productions, an edgy rock 'n' roll cabaret troupe, and to Brian Sanders' JUNK Dance Company, which choreographs around stuff that Sanders trash-picks on Philadelphia streets.
NEWS
December 29, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Jordan Matter is a one-man flash mob - with a camera. On a frosty Monday in early December, Matter and two dancers from the Pennsylvania Ballet and one from BalletX are pinballing around downtown, politely commandeering Santa's seat in City Hall's courtyard, an entire block of Addison Street, and a divider in the middle of South Broad Street - during rush hour. See it. Feel it. Shoot it. That's how Matter works. The eye behind the lens of Dancers Among Us , a 2012 New York Times best seller and an Oprah Magazine best book, says his process "relies on serendipity.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2014 | By Ellen Dunkel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadanco came to the Kimmel Center last weekend for its annual holiday treat. This time it presented a suite of dances it called "Dance Is . . . Risky Business," and indeed, Friday night's athletic performance could have knocked preconceived notions out of a skeptical dance newbie with a single jeté. The company performs Daniel Ezralow's Pulse , set to music by David Lang, every few years, and it's fun every time. Where dancers would usually do anything to avoid a skid, here they revel in skidding, wearing special footwear that lets them slide across the stage but still control their movements, stopping for a casual run or a series of impressive turns.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2014 | By Ellen Dunkel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania Ballet has undergone great change in recent months - a new artistic director, new ballet masters, new dancers, and more. One had to wonder: Would the beloved winter classic George Balanchine's The Nutcracker look different too when it opened Saturday at the Academy of Music? The once-a-year balletgoer may not notice the changes, because the Balanchine choreography must be kept as the great choreographer set it 60 years ago, only allowing for alterations he later made or would have approved.
NEWS
December 1, 2014 | By Ellen Dunkel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ballet or college? Many young dancers ask themselves that question. For Elizabeth Mateer, the matter was even more complicated when she received a job offer from Pennsylvania Ballet 2, the second company, as well as an acceptance to Harvard. Mateer, now 24, chose ballet. Five years later, as a member of the first company's corps de ballet, her decision is paying off in featured roles. In October, she shone in performances of Christopher Wheeldon's Liturgy and Alexei Ratmansky's Jeu de Cartes . Next she'll dance Sugar Plum in some performances of George Balanchine's The Nutcracker , opening Saturday.
NEWS
November 28, 2014 | BY LAUREN McCUTCHEON, Daily News Staff Writer mccutch@phillynews.com, 215-854-5991
AT 4 A.M. yesterday, security guards arrived at the bleachers in front of the Art Museum. By 6 a.m., spectators with tickets to the 95th annual 6ABC/Dunkin' Donuts Thanksgiving Day Parade started to fill those seats. By 7, Mike Avello - the "No. 1 Rocky lookalike in the world," he says - posted himself 100 feet from the original's statue and high-fived fans. The less-than-2-mile parade route gave onlookers plenty: performances by singer Lance Bass, "American Idol" winner Candice Glover, and fresh-faced Radio Disney and Disney Channel stars, person-pulled giant balloons (an injury to My Little Pony made her a last-minute scratch)
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