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LIVING
April 26, 1987 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Staff Writer
Each year, the Metropolitan Museum's Costume Institute, under the aegis of fashion doyenne Diana Vreeland, mounts a 10-month show that often has a direct influence on contemporary clothing. Vreeland, the former editor of Vogue and Harper's Bazaar, is known for being a powerfully prescient muse in these matters. The current exhibit, "Dance," has proved to be no exception. Even before the Met show opened in Manhattan in December, miles of tulle and pouf dance skirts had been introduced for spring in Europe and New York.
NEWS
October 18, 1991 | by Janet Anderson, Daily News Dance Critic
It's a day like any day for dancers in the 1990s, filled with sexism, racism, AIDS, physical challenges - and unrequited love. Or so Marla Blakey's one-act play, "The Dancers," which received its first local performance last night at the Society Hill Playhouse, would have us believe. There is a fascination with dancers' backstage life and training that sometimes seems to far exceed interest in their on-stage performances. People apparently can't get enough of the suffering and deprivation, yet rarely ask why dancers willingly, even happily, pursue such an arduous life.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2000 | By Merilyn Jackson, FOR THE INQUIRER
Philadanco's Wednesday opening-night concert proved there are at least three reasons to go: the dancers, the dancers, and the dancers. The company wraps up its 30th-anniversary season at the Prince Music Theater through . On the Shoulders of Our Ancestors is billed as an evening-length work, but it is really a loose suite of four works held together by screened excerpts from a television documentary to run next year on PBS, Free to Dance....
NEWS
March 26, 2003 | By Miriam Seidel FOR THE INQUIRER
Filmmaker Maya Deren had completed only a few short films when she died at 44 of a brain hemorrhage in 1961. But her small body of work is recognized for its dreamlike power, and she is considered one of the most important avant-garde filmmakers ever. A new documentary about Deren, In the Mirror of Maya Deren, by Martina Kudl?cek, is the centerpiece of a film series at the Prince Music Theater this weekend. "Motion Pictures: A Moving Collaboration Between Filmmakers and Dancers" will screen a number of films featuring dancers.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2002 | By Merilyn Jackson FOR THE INQUIRER
Benjamin Franklin may have harnessed electricity in Philadelphia, but for the audience at the Annenberg Center for the Arts Thursday night, Grupo Corpo Brazilian Dance Theater embodied it. Grupo Corpo commissioned Philip Glass and Uakti (wah-kee-chi), the renowned Brazilian ensemble that makes its own instruments, to create the opening work Seven or Eight Pieces for a Ballet. Evoking rivers of the Amazon basin, it has since been recorded on the CD Aguas da Amazonia (Point Music)
NEWS
November 18, 2002 | By Merilyn Jackson FOR THE INQUIRER
Four years ago, Gin MacCallum appeared like an apparition in a solo performance choreographed and performed by her - a diminutive tornado of movement, surefootedly destroying any doubts that might lie in her path about her talent. In her first full-length choreography, "In the Shape of a Spider," performed over the weekend at Christ Church, the surefootedness was still there and so was the choreography for her strong soloists, but she was not so successful in massing her group of six unevenly matched dancers.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 1987 | By Patricia O'Haire, New York Daily News
Tommy Tune didn't want any dancers for the cast of his newest Broadway project, Stepping Out, even though Tune is a dancer and choreographer himself, and even though the play is about dancing. The play, which has been running for several years in London and opens here tonight, is about a group of people - eight women and one man - who get together one night a week for a tap-dancing class. It's a sort of social event for them, besides being a way of getting in shape. "It was very important that they not know how to tap," Tune said the other day, his first day off almost since rehearsals began early last month.
NEWS
July 25, 2004 | By Wendy Walker INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Dance teachers normally don't need to worry about thunderstorms. But Jane Roosevelt, founder of Longwood Performing Arts, does. For the last four years, her students have put on a free outdoor dance recital at the pavilion in Anson B. Nixon Park in Kennett Square. "There is nothing like dancing outside," she said. "The backdrop of the trees and the lake is unbelievable. . . . It's a perfect place. " Dancer Caroline Pennartz, 18, said she enjoys having the audience so close.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2004 | By Merilyn Jackson FOR THE INQUIRER
When the Australian Dance Theater came to Dance Celebration at Annenberg Center in 2002, a longshoremen's strike held up its set on the West Coast. This week, Homeland Security officials were holding the Sydney Dance Company's set for artistic director Graeme Murphy's eagerly awaited American premiere of Ellipse. It sat for two weeks on a New York dock waiting to be X-rayed until a senatorial phone call released it - not in time, though, for Thursday night's opening show. But while we might have been protected from an Aussie attack by set, we were not safe from their attaque by dance.
NEWS
March 19, 2009 | By Merilyn Jackson FOR THE INQUIRER
The 16 dance numbers in the 2009 Garden State Dance Festival's two-weekend run at Rutgers-Camden's Walter K. Gordon Theater offer a kaleidoscopic glimpse of what emerging dancers can do when matched with established choreographers. Several of the works in last weekend's opener were highly polished, mobile - and as colorful as stained glass. They ranged in genres from ballet to boogie, pas de deux to large ensemble. Among the best works - and repeating tomorrow - is Camille A. Brown's excerpt from her larger one-woman piece, The Evolution of a Secured Feminine.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2015 | By Merilyn Jackson, For The Inquirer
It's a privilege to observe a dance rehearsal. After a while, you're not noticed. You become like that fly on the wall - the wall of a studio at the University of the Arts, where BalletX is rehearsing for its summer run, opening Wednesday, at the Wilma Theater. In one corner, dancers try on shoes, speaking softly so as not to disturb the duet across the room, under the choreographer's eye. A tall, lanky dancer, Richard Villaverde, has just banged his nose into the barre while doing pull-ups.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2015 | By Howard Gensler, Daily News
Dance Misty for me Misty Copeland  has finally broken through the glass-toe shoe. Named principal dancer at American Ballet Theatre yesterday, she became the first African-American ballerina to achieve that status in the company's 75-year history. The theatre announced the promotion five days after Copeland made her New York debut in the role of Odette/Odile in "Swan Lake. " The emotional performance - finally a real black swan - ended with trailblazing black ballerinas of earlier generations greeting Copeland on stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Though most outdoor performances would benefit from being indoors, the new choral/dance work Turbine unquestionably belonged where it was Sunday evening, at the Fairmount Water Works overlooking the Schuylkill - even though Saturday's downpour had cost it one of two planned performances. Early on, one puzzled over the amorphousness of this site-specific collaboration by choreographer Leah Stein, composer Byron au Yong, and the Mendelssohn Club choir. It seemed to be poetic murmuring, with short congenial melodies suggesting a lamentation recalled from a distant past.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2015 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Every immigrant's story begins with a journey. Some escape from harsh regimes; some leave for education or employment opportunities; others simply seek the promise of a new life in a new land. Silvana Cardell's Supper, People on the Move pays homage to these stories in a harrowing, captivating dance-theater piece. Filled with symbolism and metaphor, it forcefully conveys the emotional power of the psychological and physical perils that can plague an immigrant's passage. Supper , performed through last weekend at Crane Arts' Icebox space, opens on six performers seated at set of long folding tables, their hands and arms linked, then broken apart in waves, a series of slow gestures that embody the longing of farewell.
NEWS
June 14, 2015 | By Merilyn Jackson, For The Inquirer
From the opening curtain to the final darkening of the lights, exuberant reactions - both subjectively visceral and objectively profound - rippled through the Merriam Theater at the Pennsylvania Ballet's season closer Thursday night. Choreographer William Forsythe has returned to the States after decades helming Ballet Frankfurt and then his own company in Dresden. The Philadelphia premiere of his 1991 The Second Detail is his third work from the Pennsylvania Ballet. These decades-old, neoclassical ballets will appeal to lovers of Balanchine, whom Forsythe most admired, and, to my eye, advanced the Balanchine aesthetic.
NEWS
June 8, 2015 | By Ellen Dunkel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Angel Corella's first year as artistic director of Pennsylvania Ballet has been one of many changes. The entire artistic staff was replaced, new dancers and guest artists were hired, and, just Monday, Alexander Peters was promoted to principal dancer. But what hardly changed was the lineup of ballets audiences saw all season. "I was actually very pleased with the whole season," Corella said. "I know I could have changed a lot of the ballets that Roy [Kaiser, his predecessor] picked, but I thought it was actually quite interesting.
NEWS
May 24, 2015 | By Merilyn Jackson, For The Inquirer
Anne-Marie Mulgrew has kept her company, AMM&DCO, going for 29 years. Looking forward to its 30th, Mulgrew called this weekend's Christ Church Neighborhood House program "From the Vault. " The program begins with a new work, The Next Chapter , and ends with From the Vault , a compendium of concepts from previous works. Guest artist An Exosphere Project - a collective including choreographer/dancer Ashley Searles and videographer Wim Winklewagen - explores the possibilities in dance.
NEWS
May 10, 2015 | By Ellen Dunkel, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the Town was nominated for four Tony Awards last week. The ballet on which the Broadway show (and Gene Kelly movie) was based opened Thursday night at the Academy of Music as part of Pennsylvania Ballet's "Tribute to Jerome Robbins. " Choreographed in 1944, Fancy Free was Robbins' first ballet and a collaboration with then-on-the-brink-of-success composer Leonard Bernstein. It is the story of three young sailors who dance and show off in unsuccessful but valiant bids to win over two girls.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2015 | By Ellen Dunkel, Inquirer Staff Writer
The annual "Shut Up & Dance" show gives the dancers of Pennsylvania Ballet a chance to stretch their wings, to do something new, to play. At this year's performance, Saturday at the Forrest Theater, some tried their hand at choreography, while others danced front and center for a change. They and some of their friends in the dance community were there to raise money for the nonprofit Manna - which delivers free meals to those with life-threatening illnesses - while doing what they do best.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Melody Schofield is done with it. Done with private lap dances in the Champagne Room at Delilah's Den, where everyone knew her as Coco. Done with dancing half-naked on a bar stage. Done with paying to work - as much as $85 for a "house fee," due to Delilah's management at the start of every shift. "I was tired of it," she said. "I felt like it was time to go. " Except for one detail. She's not done with not getting paid, she said, and that's why Schofield, 26, of Philadelphia, last month put her name on the top of a potential class-action lawsuit filed in Common Pleas Court against Delilah's Den. "I think it's really unfair that they weren't compensating us for our time," Schofield said.
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