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Dangerous Game

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NEWS
August 21, 1995
Millions of Americans feel the frustrations of Sen. Bill Bradley of New Jersey, who announced last week he will not run for a fourth term. "Neither party speaks to people where they live their lives," he said. "Both have moved away . . . from my own idea of what America should be. " There's enormous truth to what Bradley, the sixth Democrat in the U.S. Senate to bow out for 1996, has to say. Bradley's promised "dialogue" with the American people could be an effective way "to get people to focus on . . . the real important issues.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1994 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
When word got out that director Abel Ferrara's follow-up to Bad Lieutenant - Harvey Keitel's descent into the muck of drugs, corruption and the Christ figure - teamed the Method King with Madonna, wags dubbed the movie Bad Lieutenant's Woman. During production, Ferrara himself dubbed the project Snake Eyes. But somewhere along the way, this descent into the muck of drugs, infidelity and the soul-wrenching act of movie-making gained a new, blandly Hollywoodish title: Dangerous Game.
NEWS
August 16, 2013 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
INSTEAD OF HEEDING written warnings of a potentially catastrophic collapse, the Salvation Army played "a dangerous game of chicken" with the owner of a building being demolished next door, an attorney said yesterday. The collapse on June 5 killed six and injured 14 who were inside the Salvation Army's thrift shop at 22nd and Market streets. So attorney Robert Mongeluzzi, citing emails among the city, the demolition-site owner and the Salvation Army that showed the charity was warned of dangerous conditions, said yesterday that he would add the Salvation Army as a defendant in litigation seeking civil damages.
NEWS
May 23, 1994 | by Nicole Weisensee, Daily News Staff Writer
Russian roulette is a deadly game of chance. The participant takes a gun, loads one bullet into its chamber, points it at his head and pulls the trigger. That's bad enough, but 15-year-old Mark James decided to make the odds even worse when he played late Friday night. Instead of one bullet, he put four into a five-shot Smith & Wesson revolver, police said. He sat on the steps in front of a house on Brown street near 51st, West Philadelphia, at about 10:30 p.m. Friday night and asked his friends if they wanted to play Russian roulette, witnesses told police.
NEWS
February 25, 1990 | By Larry Lewis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Winter darkened the dairy barn in this Mennonite corner of Lancaster County as the quiet talk around the evening's chores touched on family and the rural flow of life. Under a bare light bulb that cast odd shadows, Edwin Horst, 52, milked his cows and recalled the cheers and painful whacks of a hundred cornerball games he played as a young man, and the local fame his father had gained in the sport before him. His breathing tightened, just for an instant, with the memory of the exciting and dangerous game.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2007 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
"When I put something down, honey," Mary Weiss is saying, "I put it down. " The lead singer of the Shangri-Las - one of the great '60s girl groups, and certainly the toughest - is speaking of the music career she walked away from nearly 40 years ago. On an afternoon just chilly enough for a black leather jacket, Weiss is smoking Marlboros on a La Quinta patio during the South by Southwest Music Festival, a day after the 58-year-old New...
NEWS
March 10, 1986
Once again, rather than simply balancing the federal budget, many in Congress want to amend the Constitution so it will tell them to do so. This is a nonsolution to a very real problem. Aside from wasting time, congressional debate on this phony cure-all might be amusing except that it endangers the Constitution, and thus America's system of government, which is no trifling matter. Senate debate on this hardy perennial of capital con games began once again last week, so there they go again.
NEWS
November 24, 2004
The mentally ill deserve far better protection Congratulations to The Inquirer for two excellent articles on mental illness - "Law is indifferent to a mother's pleas" on Nov. 12 and "Wresting a life from mental illness" on Nov. 16. You covered the spectrum of the difficulties encountered by those who are diagnosed with mental illnesses, the availability of treatment (or lack thereof), and the range of beliefs about the possibilities of recovery. My experiences are similar to those described by Pat Hill in the Nov. 12 article.
NEWS
January 14, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
A family friend of the Kennedys says he is wracked by guilt because he threw the last pass to Michael Kennedy, who slammed head first into a tree and died during a football-on-skis game, the Denver Post reported yesterday. Blake Fleetwood, who said he has skied with the Kennedys for more than 20 years, told the newspaper he passed the foam football to Kennedy, who was ahead of everybody and looking back for a pass. "I've been very wracked about this, the guilt," he said. "I have this majestic view of Michael going out for a pass.
NEWS
July 27, 2009
On race, playing a dangerous game President Obama, Judge Sonia Sotomayor, and now Harvard Professor Henry Louis Gates Jr. are playing a very dangerous game ("Inequality under law," Friday). Each has placed a bet, I believe incorrectly, that the American public has an unlimited tolerance for race-baiting, victimization, and reparations disguised as affordable mortgages, "stimulus," and national health care. For decades, millions of Americans have been denied educational opportunities and career paths despite superior objective credentials.
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NEWS
June 25, 2016
To secure the 2016 Olympics back in 2009, Rio promised to clean up its water. That would have been a relief not just to the world's athletes but also to Rio de Janeiro's residents, who live with dirty, dangerous waterways congested with raw sewage and castoffs ranging from shoes to couches. But it never happened. The Brazilian city's water quality is so poor that its Guanabara Bay is a confirmed source of antibiotic-resistant super-bacteria. That people live amid these conditions - and that Olympic athletes are being asked to sail, row, and swim in them - is appalling.
NEWS
May 27, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
How do you deal with "allies" who are stabbing you in the back on security issues even as they claim they are helping? Think Pakistan - which received bipartisan U.S. backing for decades even as it sheltered the Taliban and Osama bin Laden. Or Saudi Arabia, whose citizens and charities still fund jihadis. Or a Turkish government that is endangering U.S. and European security due to the political ambitions of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. The blinders have finally come off with regard to the first two "frenemies.
NEWS
March 4, 2016
ISSUE | CAMPAIGN 2016 Trump is playing a dangerous game Donald Trump is a potentially dangerous dictator if he wins the presidency. Many people have expressed a similar concern because of his expressions of bigotry and lack of respect for democracy. However, Trump is now espousing another dangerous plan: He is threatening the free press in this country, one of the most essential institutions of a democracy. Trump is threatening to use libel laws to punish media organizations for criticizing him, a terrifying possibility that could destroy everything we hold dear in this country ("Republicans' moment to decide is at hand," Tuesday)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2016 | By Ellen Dunkel, Staff Writer
Dangerous Games is billed as Michael Flatley's final tour as the Lord of the Dance. After 20 years of bringing Irish dance to mainstream audiences, Flatley appeared in only the final 10 minutes of Sunday night's show at the Wells Fargo Center. He was greeted like Elvis entering the building. Flatley danced just a few phrases, but the show, with his name in lights on the backdrop, would not have been complete without a sighting. Dangerous Games follows the format of Flatley's previous shows, which began in 1994 with Riverdance and continued with Lord of the Dance in 1996.
SPORTS
December 24, 2013 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
On the Eagles' second offensive play Sunday night, Nick Foles tossed a screen pass to LeSean McCoy and a heartbeat later felt all the fear and caution that his coach disregarded come crashing into his chest. Julius Peppers, the Chicago Bears' 6-foot-7, 287-pound defensive end, somehow ended up unblocked, and he charged past running back Chris Polk and ran through Foles as if the Eagles quarterback were the finish-line tape in a 100-meter dash. The hit was oh-so routine for the average NFL game - the sort of sequence that gave credence to the notion that Kelly should have sat his starters Sunday.
NEWS
August 16, 2013 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
INSTEAD OF HEEDING written warnings of a potentially catastrophic collapse, the Salvation Army played "a dangerous game of chicken" with the owner of a building being demolished next door, an attorney said yesterday. The collapse on June 5 killed six and injured 14 who were inside the Salvation Army's thrift shop at 22nd and Market streets. So attorney Robert Mongeluzzi, citing emails among the city, the demolition-site owner and the Salvation Army that showed the charity was warned of dangerous conditions, said yesterday that he would add the Salvation Army as a defendant in litigation seeking civil damages.
NEWS
January 8, 2010 | By Eric Rozenman
College football's bowl pageant - all 34 games - has just finished, and the NFL's playoffs are about to begin. But this season's biggest gridiron news comes from hospitals and medical schools. One recent headline declared that CTE (chronic traumatic encephalopathy), a degenerative condition caused by brain damage, "is a real risk to football players. " Another announced: "NFL starts testing several helmet models; League seeks to find gear that better protects players. " A Boston University School of Medicine study, part of a two-decade examination of the brains of dementia sufferers, found that all 11 former football players examined showed evidence of CTE. "Repeated concussions in football have long-term effects and can lead to dementia at a young age," the survey reported.
NEWS
July 27, 2009
On race, playing a dangerous game President Obama, Judge Sonia Sotomayor, and now Harvard Professor Henry Louis Gates Jr. are playing a very dangerous game ("Inequality under law," Friday). Each has placed a bet, I believe incorrectly, that the American public has an unlimited tolerance for race-baiting, victimization, and reparations disguised as affordable mortgages, "stimulus," and national health care. For decades, millions of Americans have been denied educational opportunities and career paths despite superior objective credentials.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2007 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
"When I put something down, honey," Mary Weiss is saying, "I put it down. " The lead singer of the Shangri-Las - one of the great '60s girl groups, and certainly the toughest - is speaking of the music career she walked away from nearly 40 years ago. On an afternoon just chilly enough for a black leather jacket, Weiss is smoking Marlboros on a La Quinta patio during the South by Southwest Music Festival, a day after the 58-year-old New...
NEWS
March 4, 2005
SAT's essay gives students a chance to shine As a senior in high school, I am part of the last class to take the SATs without the new writing requirement. Originally, I felt a wave of relief that I would not be subjected to such cruel and unusual torture. It seemed to me that the test was inherently unfair. After all, when in life must one be prepared to write poetically for 25 minutes on an unknown topic? Usually, one has the ability to plan, write, review, and correct one's work before presenting it. It seemed atrocious to report scores based on a 25-minute struggle.
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