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Daniel Faulkner

NEWS
June 3, 1995 | by John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writers Scott Flander, Dave Davies, Jim Nolan and Valerie M. Russ contributed to this report
The white-hot case of convicted Philly cop-killer Mumia Abu-Jamal is recharging with protests scheduled in New York and Philadelphia - and with caution lights going up in Harrisburg - in answer to Gov. Ridge's order to execute Abu-Jamal on Aug. 17. Ridge yesterday issued a long-awaited death warrant for the 41-year-old former Philadelphia radio journalist convicted in the 1981 killing of Philadelphia police officer Daniel Faulkner. An international network of Abu-Jamal supporters, believing him framed, was planning to take part in a New York rally at City Hall Park tomorrow and a Philadelphia news conference Monday outside City Hall.
NEWS
April 24, 1999 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania death-row inmate Mumia Abu-Jamal is a worldwide media sensation, but last night, the spotlight was on Daniel Faulkner, the young Philadelphia police officer he was convicted of killing. More than 800 friends and supporters of the Faulkner family gathered at the Union League in Center City to pay tribute and remember the 25-year-old officer who was gunned down in the line of duty. They gathered on the eve of a demonstration of support for Abu-Jamal at rallies culminating at City Hall.
NEWS
September 24, 2010 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
Just got off the phone with Philadelphia filmmaker Tigre Hill, whose documentary The Barrel of a Gun , which gives an uncompromising perspective on Mumia Abu-Jamal, premiered this week at the Merriam Theater. One of the things I admire about Hill, whom I've known for more than 10 years, is that his work is always provocative - whether you agree with it or not. But I've got to admit, I left the screening of his movie shaking my head in disbelief. And I had to tell him so. Let's see. On one side, you've got the do-gooder prosecutor and the stalwart Police Department.
NEWS
August 4, 1999 | by Jim Nolan, Daily News Staff Writer
Convicted cop-killer Mumia Abu-Jamal and his supporters went on the attack yesterday against the former prison volunteer who said that Abu-Jamal confessed to the 1981 killing of police officer Daniel Faulkner during a jailhouse visit in the early 1990s. It was the latest salvo in the raging public relations war over the future of the death-row inmate, whose appeals for a new trial have been consistently rejected by state courts, only to be championed in the court of public opinion by left-leaning celebrities, social anarchists and anti-death penalty advocates.
NEWS
April 23, 1999
By the tens of thousands, caring people are expected to come to Philadelphia to march for justice. Yet tomorrow's event cannot possibly advance the cause of justice. There will be banners decrying police misconduct - a grave problem that has disgraced departments in Philadelphia, New York and around the country. But the dedicated opponents of uniformed brutality, racism and corruption are undercutting their credibility by marching and rallying on behalf of a convicted cop-killer, Mumia Abu-Jamal.
NEWS
June 25, 1997 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
Maureen Faulkner, the widow of slain police officer Daniel Faulkner, is accusing City Council President John Street of being a "promoter" for Mumia Abu-Jamal, the man convicted of killing her husband. Faulkner, who made her comments in a letter to the Daily News, was reacting to a June 4 Council briefing arranged by Street for Abu-Jamal supporters. Only Street and two other Council members Street attended the briefing in Council's caucus room. Abu-Jamal supporters had lobbied Council to pass a resolution in support of the cop-killer's request for a new trial but failed to gain a single sponsor.
NEWS
April 5, 2000
A hearing tomorrow at the Criminal Justice Center will determine whether former Police Officer Christopher DiPasquale is charged with murder in the killing of Donta Dawson. There is an epidemic of police killings and violations of the democratic rights of black and Puerto Rican people across this country. Why are police never convicted of killing unarmed African or Puerto Rican people (Amadou Diallo in New York, Dawson in Philadelphia)? When statistics show that crime is dropping in all categories, why is there a boom in the profitable prison industry?
NEWS
May 25, 1995
Some people who oppose the death penalty are always looking for someone to put a sympathetic face on their cause. Unfortunately for them, there aren't many sympathetic faces on death row. That's the only possible explanation for the fact that Mumia Abu-Jamal is an international hero. The former radio reporter was convicted of firing a bullet into the bridge of a police officer's nose as he lay wounded on the ground, killing him instantly. Most of his supporters are linked to fringe anti-execution or civil-rights groups who find Jamal the perfect poster child for their beliefs.
NEWS
July 1, 1995 | By Marc Kaufman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In its first legal response to death row inmate Mumia Abu-Jamal's appeal last month for a new trial, the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office has argued that the judge who initially presided over the 1982 trial should also hear the appeal. Abu-Jamal's appeal contended that Common Pleas Court Judge Albert F. Sabo had showed himself to be prejudiced against the defendant in the tumultuous trial, and that he could not fairly rule on the appeal. But Assistant District Attorney Hugh Burns yesterday filed a brief arguing that Sabo could be impartial and should not recuse himself.
NEWS
August 15, 1995 | BY MUBARAK S. DAHIR
The controversial case of Mumia Abu-Jamal, the black journalist and political radical sentenced to die for the 1981 murder of white police officer Daniel Faulkner, has raised a lot of questions, not just about the specifics of this particular case, but about the issue of fairness in our criminal justice system. Mostly, those questions circle around the issue of racial equity. Sadly, however, I have discovered a subtle anti-gay element is this disturbing case. Recently, I was speaking with former assistant district attorney Joseph McGill, who prosecuted the case in 1982.
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