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Daniel Garber

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NEWS
April 25, 1995 | By Pheralyn Dove, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Daniel Garber, the late Bucks County impressionist, loved to paint from real life. That's how he created The White Porch, one of his earlier and most memorable works, on the spur of the moment in 1909. Garber's granddaughter, Dana Garber Applestein of Doylestown, recently recalled the now-legendary story during a telephone interview. While driving his pickup truck along River Road, on his way to collect the mail in Pleasantville, Garber came across a white porch where houseplants had just been set out. The serene view, with its exquisite play of natural light, stunned him. He quickly got permission from the owner to paint the scene and rushed home for a canvas, his paint box, paintbrushes and his wife, May Franklin Garber, who brought along a kimono to wear while posing in a rocking chair on the porch.
NEWS
August 26, 1993 | By Kay Lazar, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
"To know me now you would have to know the place. Everyone knows it's half of me. " - Daniel Garber, 1929, writing about Cuttalossa. It's there, in the shadow. Cuttalossa. Look closely at The Studio Wall, the Daniel Garber painting featured in a new exhibit of Bucks County artists at the James A. Michener Art Museum in Doylestown. Garber's portrait of his wife, Mary, standing by a wall in his studio, captures the shadow cast by the studio's French doors. And in the shadow is a hint of the enchanted world Garber created just outside those doors - the 10-acre former mill not far from New Hope where he settled in 1907, then rebuilt into a lush, flower-filled oasis as dream-like as the landscapes he is noted for. He called the estate, along a narrow, winding road off Route 32, Cuttalossa.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1994 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
In the summer of 1992, author James A. Michener set a challenge for the art museum in Doylestown that bears his name. If the museum could generate gifts of at least 40 museum-quality works by artists associated with Bucks County, Michener would enrich the museum's endowment by $500,000. The idea, Michener explained at the time, was to build up the museum's collection of Bucks County art by encouraging area residents to participate in the museum's growth. As it developed, the museum went well over the top of Michener's goal.
NEWS
April 16, 1997 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Grace Berst d'Entremont, 84, of Feasterville, an artist whose works hang in buildings designed by her architect husband, died Sunday at Abington Memorial Hospital. Mrs. d'Entremont was born in China's Hunan Province, the daughter of medical missionaries who spent 35 years in China. Her early education came in China, and she spent her high school years in Orlando, Fla. After graduation, she spent a year with grandparents in Erie, then accepted a scholarship to the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts.
NEWS
April 24, 1994 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The big event at the James A. Michener Art Museum this spring and summer is the exhibit devoted to "Masterworks of American Impressionism: Edward Redfield and the New Hope Group. " The display contains 34 items. The title is a bit grandiose for its contents, though undoubtedly three of the seven featured artists may be considered full-fledged masters - Edward W. Redfield, Daniel Garber and Robert Spencer. Some first-rate large paintings are in the show, enough to suggest a general outline of Pennsylvania impressionism.
NEWS
October 1, 1995 | By Pheralyn Dove, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
BEFORE civilization intruded, Pennsylvania's Delaware Water Gap was the domain for all that was natural and beautiful. Near the river's edge, where effervescent light, shadows and reflections beckoned from the mountains in the distance, deer pranced through the foliage at the feet of statuesque sycamore trees. Bucks County landscape artist Daniel Garber captured this pristine setting in his celebrated mural A Wooded Watershed, on view in the borough through Nov. 12 at the James A. Michener Art Museum.
NEWS
July 21, 2011 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
A vibrant Claude Monet landscape, a dappled Camille Pissarro apple tree, and a luminous portrait by Daniel Garber of his young daughter, widely considered the Pennsylvania artist's greatest work, are among a sweeping array of acquisitions announced Thursday by the Philadelphia Museum of Art. The museum also disclosed a promised gift of 190 works by self-taught artists from the collection of Jill and Sheldon Bonovitz, who have built one of...
NEWS
June 11, 1992 | By Kathryn Quigley, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As 100 supporters cheered him on, Doylestown's Pulitzer-Prize winning author James A. Michener yesterday heralded the $1.65 million expansion of the Bucks County art museum that bears his name. "Neighbors, to turn this old jail into an art museum is a monumental act and one that speaks well for the future," the author told the people assembled on the lawn of the James A. Michener museum in Doylestown. Michener, author of Hawaii, Centennial and Chesapeake, and his wife, Mari, agreeably posed for photos with a ceremonial shovel, decorated with marbleized motifs by Bucks County artist Robert Dodge.
NEWS
December 11, 1993 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A major collection of paintings by artists of the Bucks County school will be offered next week by the Alderfer Auction company - including an Edward Redfield landscape that may sell for more than $100,000. The landscape done by Redfield is one of 15 in the collection, which also contains works by George W. Sotter, Fern Coppedge and Henry Snell. The pictures are part of Alderfer's Holiday Auction, a catalogue sale that will begin at 9 a.m. Thursday at the Alderfer Auction Center, 501 Fairgrounds Rd., Hatfield.
NEWS
September 6, 2002 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Quita Brodhead, 101, of Wayne, a prolific painter, died of colon cancer Wednesday at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Mrs. Brodhead's work evolved over a career that spanned more than 80 years from figurative still-lifes and portraits to abstracts, and then to a series of spirals and circles. The common thread in her painting was vivid color and luminosity. Marie Waggaman Berl was born in Wilmington and acquired her nickname from her father, who called her Mariequita - "little Marie. " She studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, where she struggled in the required drawing class.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 22, 2011 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
A vibrant Claude Monet landscape, a dappled Camille Pissarro apple tree, and a luminous portrait by Daniel Garber of his young daughter, widely considered the Pennsylvania artist's greatest work, are among a sweeping array of acquisitions announced Thursday by the Philadelphia Museum of Art. The museum also disclosed a promised gift of 190 works by self-taught artists from the collection of Jill and Sheldon Bonovitz, who have built one of...
NEWS
September 3, 2009 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
One of Philadelphia's longest-serving arts leaders is stepping down. Michael W. Schantz, director and chief executive officer of the Woodmere Art Museum since 1981, will leave his post Dec. 31. Asked why he was resigning now, just as the Chestnut Hill museum was expanding, the 61-year-old Schantz said: "Before I get any older, I'd like to take on another challenge. I like the idea of finding another start-up situation. What I'm good at is . . . putting the infrastructure in place.
LIVING
February 1, 2008 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Rago Arts and Auction Center's Feb. 9 sale of 19th- and 20th-century American and European art introduces a de facto new generation of Pennsylvania impressionists, as well as some other emerging artists. And all but a few of the 124 lots have presale estimates of four figures or less. Works by two artists born in 1958 offer a fine case in point. Christopher Willetts' Mount Soda Inn is a classic depiction of a cluster of stone structures on a snow-covered road reminiscent of the great Bucks County painters of the start of the 20th century.
LIVING
June 15, 2007 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
The top prices at Freeman's sale of fine art June 24 are likely to go for works by Pennsylvania impressionists from Bucks County, including Daniel Garber and Fern Coppedge. But perhaps the most memorable of the 150 lots in the sale, which will begin at 2 p.m. at the gallery at 1808 Chestnut St., is by an artist associated with a onetime Philadelphia institution, the Saturday Evening Post. The work, titled Charwomen in Theater, is by Norman Rockwell and depicts two cleaning ladies taking a break in the red upholstered seats of what could easily be the Academy of Music, scanning an abandoned copy of Playbill.
NEWS
May 23, 2004 | By Joseph S. Kennedy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
During the years she lived in Bucks County, Fern Coppedge often would venture forth on a wintry day dressed in a bearskin coat, sketchbook draped over her shoulder, looking for the perfect scene to paint. "I have to be cold in order to paint it to look cold," she once said. For more than 30 years, Coppedge was a tenacious artist who saw magic in a landscape blanketed with snow, with most of her work reflecting the then-rural Bucks County of the first half of the 20th century.
NEWS
February 11, 2004 | By Frank Wilson INQUIRER BOOKS EDITOR
The literary and artistic legacy of Doylestown and its environs is so rich you could write a book about it. Actually, there is such a book. It's called The Genius Belt (Michener Museum/Penn State, $29.95). A collection of essays edited by George S. Bush, a onetime editor at the Saturday Evening Post, it boasts an informative introduction by James A. Michener, who himself loomed large in the aforementioned legacy, and a delightfully chatty account by biographer Dorothy Herrmann of the writers who lived thereabouts.
NEWS
September 6, 2002 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Quita Brodhead, 101, of Wayne, a prolific painter, died of colon cancer Wednesday at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Mrs. Brodhead's work evolved over a career that spanned more than 80 years from figurative still-lifes and portraits to abstracts, and then to a series of spirals and circles. The common thread in her painting was vivid color and luminosity. Marie Waggaman Berl was born in Wilmington and acquired her nickname from her father, who called her Mariequita - "little Marie. " She studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, where she struggled in the required drawing class.
NEWS
March 2, 2002 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
The Alderfer Auction Co.'s two-day catalog sale next week is attracting nationwide attention, thanks to a landscape by Daniel Garber that is expected to sell for $180,000 to $200,000 at the auction's first session Wednesday. But another suburban auction Wednesday is also drawing notice, thanks to its unusual main offering: a complete barbershop interior. Dating to the 1930s, the interior will be offered by Evans Auction at a sale beginning at 6 p.m. in Hulmeville. Auctioneer Bob Evans plans to sell the whole shop as a unit, whatever the price.
NEWS
August 12, 2001 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
One day last winter, Al Lachman received a phone call from the Canadian government. Could Canada reproduce four of his paintings of the homeless for a new census poster, the caller asked. Statistics Canada, the agency calling, had seen Lachman's Web site - www.lachmanstudios.com - and believed his work would be perfect for the poster, meant to encourage counting of the homeless in the 2001 national census, said Carmel Forbes, communications officer for Statistics Canada. "We were looking for pictures . . . that would be tasteful" as well as "moving but not overly sentimental," Forbes said.
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