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Danny Huston

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NEWS
August 3, 1988 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
John Huston's final masterpiece, The Dead, ranks as one of the most powerful and moving farewells in screen history. The arrival of Mr. North, directed by his son Danny, offers reassurance that the torch has passed into the right hands. John Huston was all set to take the lead in his son's witty, elegant and whimsical rendering of Thornton Wilder's fable, when failing health forced him to withdraw. Robert Mitchum stepped in to take the part of the eccentric millionaire James McHenry Bosworth and Huston died shortly before the film was completed.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1988 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
Toward the end of the shooting of Mr. North in the stately resort of Newport, R.I., last summer, Danny Huston made his daily visit to his father in the hospital. John Huston was dying, but despite his frail health, he insisted on getting a thorough report from the set - and he was full of shrewd questions and counsel. But on this particular evening, he had something different and ambivalent to say - the kind of ironic line that would fit seamlessly into a typical Huston film. "He told me, 'Can you believe there are only two more weeks to go?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2006 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
This review originally was published in April during the Philadelphia Film Festival. The difference between an Australian western and an American one? Camels pull the stagecoach into town, and the "savages" terrorizing the pioneers are aboriginals, not American Indians. But The Proposition, a beautiful, bloody meditation on justice, family, and the trap of retribution, is in every respect an artful addition to the canon of six-shooter morality tales. With echoes of Clint Eastwood (star Guy Pearce even rolls a cigarette like the Man With No Name)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2007 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A numerological, super-dumb-ological thriller, The Number 23 boasts a deadpan voice-over from a sedate Jim Carrey, a plot that could have been a Twilight Zone episode (and maybe was), and more hammy, unintentional hoots than a bad night at a comedy club. Carrey stars as Walter Sparrow, a mild-mannered dogcatcher who gets a book called The Number 23, starts reading it, and is quickly wowed by the so-called 23 enigma - significant events and people connected to the digits, like Julius Caesar was stabbed 23 times, Shakespeare was born and died on April 23, each parent contributes 23 chromosomes to a child's DNA, and David Beckham wears the number 23. Not to mention that the bus that goes by in the movie is Route No. 23. Heavy, dude!
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1993 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Much of the fiction that Gabrielle Colette published over a long and fruitful career was autobiographical, and anyone seeking insight into the mind of a remarkable writer is better served by reading her novels than sitting through Danny Huston's Becoming Colette. The challenges of bringing the inner forces that shape a writer and the creative process of writing itself to the screen in persuasive form are extremely difficult. Huston, who made such a promising start in directing when he took over the helm of Mr. North from his ailing father, John, has made some strange choices in meeting the problem.
NEWS
February 5, 1993 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
The art house circuit discovered recently that period movies featuring European actors in nice clothes in nice houses are box office gold. "Enchanted April" and "Howards End" achieved huge success last summer, virtually guaranteeing a slew of hopeful imitators, the first of which appears to be "Becoming Colette. " This biography of French novelist Colette has the costume-conscious atmosphere of its predecessors, but in content it's really much more like the latest "Emmanuele" soft porn movie.
NEWS
April 6, 2006 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The difference between an Australian western and an American one? Camels pull the stagecoach into town, and the "savages" terrorizing the pioneers are aborginals, not American Indians. But The Proposition, a beautiful, bloody meditation on justice, family, and the trap of retribution, is in every respect an artful addition to the canon of six-shooter morality tales. With echoes of Eastwood (star Guy Pearce even rolls a cigarette like the Man With No Name) and John Ford, director John Hillcoat's late-19th-century yarn about a pact between a lawman and an outlaw is a hard, haunting gem. Pearce plays Charlie Burns, one of a band of notorious desperadoes headed by his brother, the quite mad Arthur (Danny Huston)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1989 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
John Huston's son directs a wonderful cast, and a gang of Hollywood's youngest stars goes west, as the world of home video enters 1989. MR. NORTH (1988) (Virgin Vision) $89.95. 90 minutes. Anthony Edwards, Robert Mitchum, Harry Dean Stanton, Anjelica Huston, Mary Stuart Masterson, Virginia Madsen, Lauren Bacall. Failing health forced John Huston to withdraw from the lead in son Danny Huston's version of Thornton Wilder's last novel - a whimsical fable about a young man who comes to Newport, R.I., in 1926 and has an extraordinary impact on the rogues and dreamers who people the resort.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
FOR THE NEXT two weeks, a pair of brawny, woodland ogres will dominate the movies. One is Shrek, the other is Russell Crowe, who picks up a longbow and strides through Sherwood Forest to play the title role in "Robin Hood. " He does so under the strong hand of Ridley Scott. The director is known for his visual panache, but it's his horse-whisperer ability to corral the bucking Crowe that's yielded this unusual, often fruitful partnership. Few men dare work with Crowe more than once.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2010 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
The strange and gloomy Edge of Darkness is Mel Gibson's first job in front of a camera since M. Night Shyamalan's UFO nuttiness, 2002's Signs . The fact that the wild-eyed movie star looks considerably worse for wear - his rugged mug crosshatched and grooved, his scowl severe - could certainly be attributed (if one discounts all those tabloid headlines) to the role at hand: Gibson is Tom Craven, a Boston Police Department detective who has just witnessed his twentysomething daughter being blown away.
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NEWS
June 14, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
* MAGIC CITY. 9 tonight, Starz. * MAD MEN. 10 p.m. Sunday, AMC. SOME OF THE PEOPLE watching "Mad Men" are being driven a little mad themselves. Starved of sensation by a show that's so far failed to deliver a Red Wedding, a la "Game of Thrones," or even a measly serial killer, they've begun spinning theories on the Web about Charles Manson, the murdered actress Sharon Tate and a certain T-shirt worn by Megan Draper (Jessica Paré) - theories that, if true, would turn the show into something I doubt it was ever intended to be. I blow hot and cold on "Mad Men," but even I appreciate that it's not that screwed up. I think.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
FOR THE NEXT two weeks, a pair of brawny, woodland ogres will dominate the movies. One is Shrek, the other is Russell Crowe, who picks up a longbow and strides through Sherwood Forest to play the title role in "Robin Hood. " He does so under the strong hand of Ridley Scott. The director is known for his visual panache, but it's his horse-whisperer ability to corral the bucking Crowe that's yielded this unusual, often fruitful partnership. Few men dare work with Crowe more than once.
NEWS
May 14, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com215-854-5992
FOR THE NEXT two weeks, a pair of brawny, woodland ogres will dominate the movies. One is Shrek, the other is Russell Crowe, who picks up a longbow and strides through Sherwood Forest to play the title role in "Robin Hood. " He does so under the strong hand of Ridley Scott. The director is known for his visual panache, but it's his horse-whisperer ability to corral the bucking Crowe that's yielded this unusual, often fruitful partnership. Few men dare work with Crowe more than once.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2010 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
The strange and gloomy Edge of Darkness is Mel Gibson's first job in front of a camera since M. Night Shyamalan's UFO nuttiness, 2002's Signs . The fact that the wild-eyed movie star looks considerably worse for wear - his rugged mug crosshatched and grooved, his scowl severe - could certainly be attributed (if one discounts all those tabloid headlines) to the role at hand: Gibson is Tom Craven, a Boston Police Department detective who has just witnessed his twentysomething daughter being blown away.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2007 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A numerological, super-dumb-ological thriller, The Number 23 boasts a deadpan voice-over from a sedate Jim Carrey, a plot that could have been a Twilight Zone episode (and maybe was), and more hammy, unintentional hoots than a bad night at a comedy club. Carrey stars as Walter Sparrow, a mild-mannered dogcatcher who gets a book called The Number 23, starts reading it, and is quickly wowed by the so-called 23 enigma - significant events and people connected to the digits, like Julius Caesar was stabbed 23 times, Shakespeare was born and died on April 23, each parent contributes 23 chromosomes to a child's DNA, and David Beckham wears the number 23. Not to mention that the bus that goes by in the movie is Route No. 23. Heavy, dude!
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2006 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
This review originally was published in April during the Philadelphia Film Festival. The difference between an Australian western and an American one? Camels pull the stagecoach into town, and the "savages" terrorizing the pioneers are aboriginals, not American Indians. But The Proposition, a beautiful, bloody meditation on justice, family, and the trap of retribution, is in every respect an artful addition to the canon of six-shooter morality tales. With echoes of Clint Eastwood (star Guy Pearce even rolls a cigarette like the Man With No Name)
NEWS
April 6, 2006 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The difference between an Australian western and an American one? Camels pull the stagecoach into town, and the "savages" terrorizing the pioneers are aborginals, not American Indians. But The Proposition, a beautiful, bloody meditation on justice, family, and the trap of retribution, is in every respect an artful addition to the canon of six-shooter morality tales. With echoes of Eastwood (star Guy Pearce even rolls a cigarette like the Man With No Name) and John Ford, director John Hillcoat's late-19th-century yarn about a pact between a lawman and an outlaw is a hard, haunting gem. Pearce plays Charlie Burns, one of a band of notorious desperadoes headed by his brother, the quite mad Arthur (Danny Huston)
NEWS
February 5, 1993 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
The art house circuit discovered recently that period movies featuring European actors in nice clothes in nice houses are box office gold. "Enchanted April" and "Howards End" achieved huge success last summer, virtually guaranteeing a slew of hopeful imitators, the first of which appears to be "Becoming Colette. " This biography of French novelist Colette has the costume-conscious atmosphere of its predecessors, but in content it's really much more like the latest "Emmanuele" soft porn movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1993 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Much of the fiction that Gabrielle Colette published over a long and fruitful career was autobiographical, and anyone seeking insight into the mind of a remarkable writer is better served by reading her novels than sitting through Danny Huston's Becoming Colette. The challenges of bringing the inner forces that shape a writer and the creative process of writing itself to the screen in persuasive form are extremely difficult. Huston, who made such a promising start in directing when he took over the helm of Mr. North from his ailing father, John, has made some strange choices in meeting the problem.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1989 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
John Huston's son directs a wonderful cast, and a gang of Hollywood's youngest stars goes west, as the world of home video enters 1989. MR. NORTH (1988) (Virgin Vision) $89.95. 90 minutes. Anthony Edwards, Robert Mitchum, Harry Dean Stanton, Anjelica Huston, Mary Stuart Masterson, Virginia Madsen, Lauren Bacall. Failing health forced John Huston to withdraw from the lead in son Danny Huston's version of Thornton Wilder's last novel - a whimsical fable about a young man who comes to Newport, R.I., in 1926 and has an extraordinary impact on the rogues and dreamers who people the resort.
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