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NEWS
October 19, 1989 | By Nancy Petersen, Special to The Inquirer
The board of the Downingtown Area Regional Authority (DARA) voted Monday night to appeal several conditions in its new operating permit from the state Department of Environmental Resources. Known as the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System or NPDES permit, the document outlines what DARA engineers consider an unrealistic timetable for getting a phosphorous-removal system on line at the sewage treatment plant. The challenges will be taken to the Environmental Hearing Board, the state agency that hears appeals of DER orders.
NEWS
May 11, 1989 | By Adrienne Beard, Special to The Inquirer
Caln Township commissioners this week rejected the Phase III amendment proposed by the Downingtown Area Regional Authority (DARA) to expand its sewage-treatment capacity to accommodate Rouse & Associate's proposed Churchill development. The rejection does not affect the ongoing expansion plans of the Phase III committee. The proposed amendment was in reaction to Rouse's assertion that the Churchill project, which spans East and West Whiteland Townships, would generate about 800,000 gallons a day from East Whiteland.
NEWS
April 16, 1989 | By Mark E. Neumann, Special to the Inquirer
Caln Township commissioners again tabled action last week on an amendment to an agreement proposed by the Downingtown Area Regional Authority (DARA) allowing planning and engineering studies to begin for expansion of their sewage-treatment facilities. The plan, called Phase III, requires approval by officials in Caln, East Caln, West Whiteland and Uwchlan Townships and the borough of Downingtown - all DARA members - before the authority can begin. DARA officials say the expansion is needed because of the anticipated increase in the need for sewage treatment in the central part of Chester County.
NEWS
November 22, 1990 | By Nancy Petersen, Special to The Inquirer
The Phase III committee is broke - again. Appointed by the Downingtown Area Regional Authority in September 1987 to draft a 20-year waste-water treatment plan for the Exton region, the committee has so far gone through $220,000, DARA administrator Joe Drozd said Monday night. The committee's financial plight came to light just as the DARA board was ready to authorize final work on a controversial expansion plan accepted by the Phase III committee on Nov. 1. Tom Brown of Gannett Fleming, the authority's engineer, told the those at the meeting that on the basis of engineering funding authorized to date, "We've used it. " In June, the committee raised $12,000 from the four townships paying for the study, which at that time committee members thought would be enough money to finish the work.
NEWS
May 18, 1989 | By Nancy Petersen, Special to The Inquirer
The Downingtown Area Regional Authority is getting ready for a day in court. At its meeting Monday night, the DARA board voted to have its solicitor, Edward G. Conroy, file a complaint in Chester County Court against Parsons Downingtown Associates, and at the same time file a claim with the American Arbitration Association. Parsons Downingtown Associates in July completed the Phase II plant at the Downingtown Regional Water Pollution Control Center, according to DARA administrator Joseph Drozd.
NEWS
February 23, 1992 | By Nancy Petersen, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Federal environmental officials are asking who's in charge at the Downingtown Area Regional Authority, part owner of the largest sewage- treatment plant in central Chester County. DARA has no paid staff, only consultants. That's a situation that may have to change if the authority expects the Environmental Protection Agency to approve DARA's program regulating industrial users of the system. EPA also is requiring the authority to amend its agreement with the five municipalities that formed DARA in 1985.
NEWS
July 7, 1996 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A plan to increase the capacity of the largest sewage treatment plant in central Chester County is under review by state environmental officials, and opposition already has surfaced. Last month, county and local governments were notified that the Downingtown Area Regional Authority was seeking approval from the state Department of Environmental Protection to allow an extra 500,000 gallons of sewage a day into the plant. Two Chester County agencies have weighed in against the proposal, and Delaware environmental officials indicated they also plan to object - in each case, on the grounds of protecting drinking water.
NEWS
June 10, 1990 | By Nancy Petersen, Special to The Inquirer
In September 1987, when the Downingtown Area Regional Authority (DARA) appointed a Phase III Committee to plan for the authority's next expansion, optimists figured the project would be wrapped up in less than a year. Now, after spending almost three years and $244,000, the Phase III Committee is hoping to greet its third anniversary with a report from its engineering consultant, Gannett Fleming Inc. of Harrisburg, on the best way to treat and dispose of the region's sewage for the next 20 years.
NEWS
March 22, 1990 | By Nancy Petersen, Special to The Inquirer
One of the county's largest employers is under pressure to clean upits act - or, more precisely, its sewage. Officials of the Downingtown Area Regional Authority said Monday night thatPepperidge Farm Inc. was not moving fast enough to meet industrial dischargestandards. Last quarter, the company paid $33,190 in additional sewer fees forviolating the standards. DARA board member Charles O'Donnell suggested that a time limit forcorrecting the problems be put in writing and sent to the Borough ofDowningtown, which has the ultimate responsibility for seeing that PepperidgeFarm complies with the standards.
NEWS
August 24, 1989 | By Nancy Petersen, Special to The Inquirer
A request from the state Department of Environmental Resources to treat contaminated water from the Strasburg Landfill at the Downingtown sewage- treatment plant is far from being granted. Despite assurances from the DER that the "leachate" is not hazardous, directors of the Downingtown Area Regional Authority remain unconvinced that the Downingtown plant is the best place to dispose of it. "We may be violating influent requirements and, therefore, do not have an obligation to treat it," said authority chairman John Robertson.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2016
Question: My cousin "Dara" and I have been lifelong friends since we were born three weeks apart. The friendship has had its natural ebbs and flows, but I can't think of a time when we didn't see each other at least once a month, even though she is a busy professional and I'm a stay-at-home mom. My second child, born last fall, had some health complications, and I turned to Dara for help figuring out medical stuff, as it's related to her field....
NEWS
September 30, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kersi Dara Kapadia, 70, of Mount Laurel, a quiet, behind-the-scenes helper in the community, died Thursday, Sept. 26, at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, of heart disease. Born Oct. 30, 1942, in Surat, India, Mr. Kapadia immigrated to the United States in 1968, studying as an undergraduate at Temple University and earning his master's degree in mathematics from Villanova University. He worked in research and development at Syntex Dental until his retirement in 1986.
NEWS
June 22, 2013 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Martin Goldberg, 82, of Mount Airy, an internal-medicine physician and former Temple University dean of medicine, died Sunday, June 15, at Artman Lutheran Home in Ambler of a neural degenerative disease. Dr. Goldberg was an authority in the field of kidney disease, having published more than 200 research articles. His career encompassed multifaceted roles as a scientist, clinician, teacher, and administrator. "He was so kind, so competent, so professional," said his wife, Marion.
NEWS
July 15, 2012
Bollywood action hero Dara Singh, 84, died at his Mumbai home Thursday, days after suffering a heart attack. Indian film stars and politicians alike issued messages of praise and condolences. Mr. Singh was born in 1928 in the Punjabi district of Amritsar and spent his youth competing in professional freestyle-wrestling tournaments. In the 1950s, he began working in Bollywood films and appeared in dozens for which he did his own stunts. He was a member of India's upper house of Parliament for the Hindu nationalist opposition, the Bharatiya Janata Party, or BJP, from 2003 to 2009.
NEWS
December 18, 2002 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For more than three decades, Barry Hoffman stood in front of fifth and sixth graders and encouraged them to be imaginative, critical thinkers. When he retired as a Philadelphia public school teacher four years ago, he was bothered by a trend he saw in education - schools de-emphasizing writing and creative arts to focus on standardized tests. He perched on a tiny chair in the Oaklyn Public School's cozy library yesterday, brow furrowed, and vowed to do something to reverse the trend.
SPORTS
September 22, 2000 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jenny Thompson and Dara Torres, two longtime rivals, two world-class American swimmers whose competitiveness forced their coach to separate them, shared the cramped space of a bronze-medal stand last night. There were no heartfelt hugs. No warm smiles. The best that can be said is that neither shoved the other off. The cold war came back to the Olympic Games last night. Torres and Thompson, whose frosty relationship was the talk of their sport several months ago, met on uncommon ground last night.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1998 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Back in the '80s, Olu Dara's club performances with the Okra Orchestra were an integral part of the hipster cultural calendar of New York. These "happenings" offered a kind of spontaneous magic missing from the city's more conventional jazz performances: Musicians associated with the free-jazz circuit would take long lusty swipes at the blues, theater people tried to be mourning divas, and Dara, an impish ringmaster, would borrow from all kinds of...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1998 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Olu Dara is always on the move, and never in a hurry. The down-home urban sophisticate sits in a Tower Records cafe across the street from the Lincoln Center sanctum where Wynton Marsalis has brought high-culture respectability to jazz. On a sultry June afternoon, the African American griot is clearly the coolest customer in the room. Dressed in jeans and a silk shirt, the trim Dara, 57, could easily be taken for a man a decade or two younger. Not that he hasn't been around: The Mississippi native's debut album, which will bring him to the Tin Angel on Friday and back to town for a show at Penn's Landing on July 11 and another at the E Center in Camden on Aug. 1, is fittingly titled In the World: From Natchez to New York (Atlantic)
NEWS
July 7, 1996 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A plan to increase the capacity of the largest sewage treatment plant in central Chester County is under review by state environmental officials, and opposition already has surfaced. Last month, county and local governments were notified that the Downingtown Area Regional Authority was seeking approval from the state Department of Environmental Protection to allow an extra 500,000 gallons of sewage a day into the plant. Two Chester County agencies have weighed in against the proposal, and Delaware environmental officials indicated they also plan to object - in each case, on the grounds of protecting drinking water.
NEWS
January 31, 1993 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
One of the region's most explosive environmental controversies could fizzle this week if Downingtown indirectly kills a project that would have dumped millions more gallons of wastewater into Brandywine Creek. In more good news for those who love the Brandywine, new standards are under consideration that would prevent toxic materials from ending up in the creek. On Wednesday, the Downingtown Council will take up the question of whether to sell off some of its extra capacity in the Downingtown Area Regional Authority's (DARA)
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