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Dark Ages

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NEWS
October 30, 1995 | By Michelle Conlin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Jerald Green, the Democratic candidate for Montgomery County treasurer, says a time warp has encircled the county courthouse. "Why do lawyers have to come to Norristown to look at court papers?" asks the 45-year-old vice president of an international computer software company. "Montgomery County is probably one of the most high-tech counties in the state. But if you go to Norristown, you feel like you've stepped back in time. . . . You don't have to have this Cecil B. DeMille cast of thousands in Norristown.
NEWS
June 2, 2008
WILL RONNIE Polaneczky kindly explain why she feels a bill to reduce animal abuse is a trivial matter? When it comes to animal abuse, the state of Pennsylvania still lingers in the dark ages. We finally see a state legislator doing something to reduce the horror in puppy mills, which mills should be outlawed altogether. So don't go off the deep end, Ronnie. Man's best friend is still in deep trouble. Helene Schwartz, Pennsauken
NEWS
December 29, 2004
What is he thinking? OBVIOUSLY, M.A. Vare, who wrote on what to do with kids who kill, still lives in the Dark Ages. I have just one question for him (although it could be a her, but I doubt it): Do you have kids? Anyone who has would never say to execute them. A more appropriate approach would be to hold parents accountable to some degree, since it is they who should be raising these kids with values that represent more respect for people, and life in general. Dave Sillery, Carneys Point, N.J.
NEWS
June 18, 2003 | By Jacqueline Soteropoulos INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Four teenagers planned the killing for weeks, listened repeatedly on the day to the song linked to mass murderer Charles Manson, and then came together for a "group hug" after they beat 16-year-old Jason Sweeney to death in a vacant Fishtown lot, according to alleged confessions from two of them. Yesterday, all four were ordered to stand trial for the killing that the judge described as "something out of the Dark Ages. " Fifteen-year-old Justina Morley lured Sweeney to his death with the promise of sex, while the three boys donned latex gloves and lay in wait, according to the confessions.
NEWS
April 12, 2005
AS THE college of cardinals prepares to vote for a new pope, I pray, with little hope, that they select a true visionary. Catholicism, as with many religions, is mired in the Dark Ages. Papal doctrines were etched in stone long before the realities of an uncontrolled population explosion, unimaginable scientific and medical innovation and irreversible societal demands for equality. Such blind adherence to outdated tenets and papal infallibility, which ignore inevitable social progress, will render whoever holds the papacy an anachronistic figurehead.
NEWS
November 8, 2011 | BY DON HARRISON
NOTHING IS WORKING the way it should - and inequities, which have always plagued us, grow worse. Yes, I know, old people are always lamenting that the world is going downhill. But today's older generation may be the first that's right. The extraordinary American system of government, which worked so well over the years, no longer does. Based on an ingenious, but delicate, balance of powers that functions through cooperation and compromise, it's bogged down in partisan bickering, extremist pressures and antiquated procedures.
NEWS
May 12, 2000
Michelle Malkin: Just say no! If ever a metropolitan area was on the verge of sensible gun laws, and (with a little nudge) in a position to lead the struggle nationally, this region qualifies. The Daily News response? Hold a drawing for 40 seats on a bus to the Million Mom March, then print Michelle Malkin columns telling us why automatic weapons are wonderful. How about some editorial board consistency? After a quarter-century of Chuck Stone's and Linda Wright Moore's enlightened columns dragging you out of the dark ages, you sink back into the pits, trying to start stuff, just like when you shilled for Frank Rizzo and the Reactionaries.
NEWS
January 21, 1986
I was saddened to read in the Jan. 12 issue that a boy has been included in a special school for non-hospitalized children with chronic conditions because he has to "have his blood and urine sugars checked every morning and take his insulin injection. " Children who happen to have diabetes are not "sick" and deserve to be treated as healthy people. I started taking insulin in 1943 when I was 6 1/2 and have had a normal life, in fact a much more interesting life than most people.
NEWS
October 8, 1986
I urge Gov. Thornburgh to veto the underage-drinking bill because of the improper amendment, by which Sen. Joe Rocks (D., Phila.) is attempting to misuse the "certificate-of-need" process in order to deny women their legal right to abortion by crippling clinics. This would be an abuse of the concept of certificate-of-need, which has been used for the last 10 years by health systems agencies. The procedure is an intricate system of checks and balances that has as its purpose the prevention of too large and duplicative hospital buildings, equipment and services in order to reduce health care costs.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 3, 2016
By Jake Blumgart The works of Umberto Eco have an unnerving bulk. When choosing the next novel to add to the queue, his tome-like books may dissuade the average reader from plucking them off the shelf. My copy of The Name of the Rose is 536 pages long and, in hardback, could be employed to great effect as a murder weapon. That's not the sole source of intimidation. There is also the Byzantine plot, which features in-depth considerations of 14th-century heresies and the works of Aristotle.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
If you've wandered along North Broad Street lately, you may be scratching your head at the phalanx of stainless steel columns that have suddenly appeared in the center, marching single-file from Callowhill Street to the North Philadelphia station. Are they modernist WiFi antennas? Props for pole dancers? Or maybe just a vulgar gesture aimed at Center City? The answer is: none of the above. Folks, those 55-foot-tall poles are supposed to be art, of the iconic variety. This misguided project, which has cost the public $14 million, is the combined work of City Hall and Avenue of the Arts , the nonprofit established during the Rendell era to clean up and market Broad Street.
SPORTS
July 1, 2015 | Marcus Hayes, Daily News Sports Columnist
PAT GILLICK seldom loses his cool, but yesterday he looked as if he was about to go medieval. Being perceived as a backward old man running a laughingstock ballclub pokes Gillick right in the gizzard. The perception of the Phillies' analytics department is thus: Tucked away in a dungeon deep below Citizens Bank Park, the Phillies employ a half-dozen shaven-pated monks who spend their days and nights bent over parchment, tallow candles providing a dim, sputtering light, by which they dutifully transcribe outdated statistical information.
NEWS
December 12, 2014 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
THE PHILLIES might want to recall their 2015 calendars. You would think they would only include players they expected to be on the roster next season. But lo and behold, there - big as life - is Jimmy Rollins on the June page. Makes one wonder whether any of the other players featured in the calendar are safe. They include Ryan Howard (January), Cole Hamels (March), Chase Utley (April) and Cliff Lee (May). And, should Marlon Byrd be concerned that he's nowhere to be found?
NEWS
November 6, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
So-called dark-money groups spent 27 percent more on this year's elections than they did in 2010, thanks to reckless Supreme Court decisions and regulatory failures allowing unlimited, undisclosed political contributions. The groups hide donors behind the tax code, disguising themselves as "social welfare" organizations. In fact, they are an increasingly powerful and poisonous political force. Analysts say they are just beginning to flex their muscles in preparation for the main event: the 2016 presidential election.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2014
FRIENDS CENTRAL'S Al Vernacchio is the cool sex-ed teacher you should have had in high school but probably didn't. Nothing's off-limits. Internet pornography and how it distorts perceptions of real-life sex. The perils of sexting. Alternative lifestyles. All this and more are common discussion topics in Vernacchio's popular class on sexuality and society. In his classroom, there's an old shoe box where students can leave anonymous questions about sex. No matter how far-fetched the inquiry, Vernacchio tackles them all, either during his lectures or on his blog.
SPORTS
April 1, 2013 | By John N. Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
If Andrew Bynum never puts on a 76ers uniform, make no mistake about it, this will go down as one of the worst deals in the history of the NBA, a transaction that will have a ripple effect perhaps for years to come. When the Sixers traded for Bynum after a two-series run in the playoffs, no one expected that this team wouldn't be better adding the 7-footer. Fifty wins should have been a given. That kind of success would have let new and untested general manager Tony DiLeo off the hook and allowed him an easier transition into his position.
SPORTS
February 4, 2013 | Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS - The Super Bowl was halted for 34 minutes because of a power outage Sunday, plunging parts of the Superdome into darkness and temporarily silencing the TV announcers in the biggest game of the year. The Baltimore Ravens were leading the San Francisco 49ers 28-6 when most of the lights in the 73,000-seat building went out with 13:22 left in the third quarter. Auxiliary power kept the playing field from going totally dark, but escalators stopped working and the concourses were only illuminated by small banks of lights tied in to emergency service.
SPORTS
December 14, 2012 | BY MARK PERNER, Daily News Staff Writer pernerm@phillynews.com
The Dark Ages: From 1992 to 1997. Or from when Charles Barkley left to when Pat Croce and Larry Brown arrived. BEFORE CHARLES Barkley decided it was time to get out of Dodge and forced a trade to the Phoenix Suns, the decline already had begun. It was obvious Barkley realized that owner Harold Katz was surrounding him with less-than-mediocre talent, expecting Barkley to turn the pumpkins into a gold carriage. Maybe it began with the trade of Mike Gminski, a Barkley pal, to the Charlotte Hornets for Armon Gilliam.
NEWS
December 16, 2011 | By Tony Norman
Muslims really thought they were doing the world a favor by pulling Europe and its mostly illiterate Christians out of the Dark Ages. But just because they foisted algebra, trigonometry, optics, astronomical charts, the classics, Arabic numerals, advanced surgical techniques, perspective in art, the lute, and artichokes on the world - while the Christian kings of Europe were smothering free inquiry - we're not about to give them any credit a thousand...
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