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Dark Shadows

LIVING
June 17, 1994 | By Susan Caba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Quick - name a local historic site with strong associations to a woman. And, no, the Betsy Ross House doesn't count. (Because, for one thing, historians aren't positive that she ever lived there.) Stymied? Here are some hints: What local, family-owned department store grew out of a woman's hat shop - even though the name suggests it was founded by men? Who wrote the proposed Equal Rights Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, and struggled unsuccessfully for 54 years to get it ratified?
NEWS
March 24, 1991 | By Donald D. Groff, Special to The Inquirer
Spring's here - time to begin planning summer travel. Following is a rundown of some of the many special events and activities that will make the summer of '91 an especially memorable travel season. Some are rare (a total solar eclipse), some are milestones (Switzerland's 700th anniversary, Vermont's 200th), and some are designed to entertain and inform us about our past. Any mere listing of such events would more than fill this section of the paper so choices had to be winnowed to a manageable number.
NEWS
August 17, 2001 | By Marybeth Hagan
Remember the days when a child was described as "a twinkle," as in "I knew your parents when you were just a twinkle in your father's eye"? With Roe v. Wade in 1973, the twinkle in a father's eye became the choice in a mother's womb. As a result, these specks of life might be aborted or wind up as waste in fertility clinics' Dumpsters. The freedom to choose has encouraged a mentality of disposability when it comes to life. Consider the surrogate mother now suing the prospective parents of her bundle of joy. A California couple, Charles H. Wheeler and Martha A. Berman of Berkeley, agreed to pay British surrogate mom Helen Beasley close to $20,000 in a contract signed in February.
NEWS
April 29, 2012 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
By sheer numbers, the caped crusaders, masked crimebusters and spandex-ed superheroes lining up at the movie box office for the summer season — which begins Friday when The Avengers opens — has to be the largest gathering of comicbook-spawned dudes (and dudettes) in the history of summer movies. In The Avengers alone, there are, of course, Iron Man, Captain America, the Hulk, Black Widow, Hawkeye and Thor, brought together by Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) to save the world from a demented Norse god (Thor's evil sibling, Loki)
NEWS
November 20, 2011 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. - When Jerry Sandusky moved his aging parents here in 1987 from Washington, Pa., he found them a three-bedroom rancher on Bristol Avenue in adjoining Ferguson Township. Its setting was similar - eerily so, in retrospect - to that of the Lemont home the longtime Pennsylvania State University assistant coach had bought just three years earlier for himself and his growing family. Like his house, his parents' also backed onto a park with a playground. And there were always children on Bristol, at first passing in and out of the busy Assembly of God church at the corner and later attending the elementary school that now occupies that site.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1989 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
Knowing a bit of history will help you enjoy this week's top video arrivals: a brilliant look at a much-discussed British government scandal, a misunderstood film from the 1940s and a story that owes much of its feel to 1960s London. SCANDAL (1989) (HBO) $89.99. 105 minutes. John Hurt, Joanne Whalley-Kilmer, Ian McKellen, Bridget Fonda. Michael Caton-Jones' film is an affair to remember: The 1963 Profumo scandal, which involved Defense Minister John Profumo, model Christine Keeler and Soviet military attache Eugene Ivanov, eventually brought down Harold Macmillan's government.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1991 | By Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer
Most of the excitement on NBC this spring will come from the network's news division, which is adding several new and almost-new programs to the network lineup. Two, "Real Life with Jane Pauley" and "Expose," took their places in the prime-time schedule on Sunday night. A new daily daytime program, "A Closer Look," begins Jan. 28. NBC unveiled just a handful of new prime-time drama or comedy series for the spring: "Blossom," which debuted last week; "Dark Shadows," premiering with a miniseries next weekend; and "Sisters," for which no air date has been chosen.
NEWS
October 26, 2012
IN OCTOBER, we enjoy vampires in all forms, from live performances of "Nosferatu" to screenings of campy films such as Tim Burton's "Dark Shadows. " But nothing can outdo Bram Stoker's original opus, "Dracula. " Watch a performance of the tale in an unexpected form this weekend, produced by West Chester's Brandywine Ballet. The ballet, choreographed by the company's own Nancy Page, takes one liberty with Stoker's original plot: The story is reimagined as a tragic romance between the characters Mina and Dracula.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1990 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
Four recent films - an Australian comedy, a satirical look at the movie business, an Argentine thriller and yet another Halloween outing - aren't the only interesting new things at the video store this week: There's a passel of classic films and music videos for every taste as well. YOUNG EINSTEIN (1989) (Warner) $89.95. 91 minutes. Yahoo Serious, Odile Le Clezio, John Howard, Pee Wee Wilson. If you're jaded by the cookie- cutter comedies churned out by Hollywood, head for this upbeat farce from down under.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1987 | By DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer
Jean Stapleton, Marion Ross and Gary Sandy in "Arsenic and Old Lace," a comedy by Joseph Kesselring. Produced by Elliot Martin, Act III Productions, James M. Nederlander and Burton Kaiser. Directed by Brian Murray, setting by Marjorie Bradley Kellogg, costumes by Jeanne Button, lighting by Pat Collins. Presented at the Forrest Theatre. In "Arsenic and Old Lace," the 46-year-old comedy that opened a three- week run at the Forrest Theatre last night, there are several wonderfully dumb Brooklyn cops who say stuff like "moider" (a killing)
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