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Daryl Hannah

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NEWS
June 14, 2006 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Police yesterday forcibly removed Kill Bill hottie Daryl Hannah from sittin' in a tree on the grounds of the 14-acre inner city L.A. urban farm that capitalist landowner guy Ralph Horowitz wants to turn into a warehouse. All sorts of celebs have voiced outrage and solidarity and stuff about the situation. (Joan Baez took a tree seat there recently.) Yesterday's protest featured dozens of chanting protesters, who've been squatting on the land to prevent its conversion, and 120 protest-busting deputies.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2001 | By REGINA MEDINA Daily News wire services contributed to this report
LOOK, IT was a movie festival - not her cuddly canine - that beckoned "Splash" siren Daryl Hannah during rehearsals for a London play last year. But Britain's Daily Mirror did blame the pooch and now they're paying for it. The actress won undisclosed libel damages from the newspaper yesterday for publishing a widely copied story claiming she skipped play practice to attend her dog's birthday. The Daily Mirror also apologized to the London High Court for printing the entirely inaccurate story last October.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1993 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Jackson Browne knows what he's in for. Among the love songs on his new album I'm Alive, to be released Tuesday, is an intriguing little number about a desperate man who vows he'll do anything to bring back the woman he loves. No, he says, when delicate inquiries are made: "I'll Do Anything" is only glancingly related to his personal life. But tabloid readers may think differently. In one of the more publicized star incidents of 1992, Browne and his longtime girlfriend, actress Daryl Hannah, broke up in a hailstorm of accusations and, some say, physical blows.
NEWS
February 12, 1999 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Staff Writer
"My Favorite Martian" raises some troubling questions that it never attempts to answer. The movie stars Jeff Daniels as a hapless earthling forced to play host to a stranded Martian, an utterly repulsive character played by a stranded Christopher Lloyd. The looming question: If this odious thing is Daniels' favorite Martian, who is his least favorite? Best not to know, I guess. Though geared toward children, who are in the best position to appreciate the movie's jokes about leftover chewing gum, ice cream over-indulgence, zipper accidents and, of course, flatulence, "My Favorite Martian" is a failure even by the lax standards of modern children's fare.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1998 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Does she or doesn't she? Only Bob, a waiter turned soap opera hunk, knows for sure. Bob, played by Maxwell Caulfield in a role that could be characterized as slimeball Pierce Brosnan, is one of five surreal figures in The Real Blonde, a labored satire about self-deluded Manhattanites vainly searching for substance behind the showbiz illusion. This comedy by Tom DiCillo (Living in Oblivion, Box of Moonlight) also features Daryl Hannah, Catherine Keener, Matthew Modine and Bridgette Wilson as Manhattan successes and wanna-bes, respectively a soap-opera babe, a makeup stylist, an aspiring thespian, and a successful fashion model.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1988 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
In every possible meaning of the expression, High Spirits should give up the ghost. This piece of tedious whimsy about an Irish castle teeming with buxom banshees and lusty leprechauns is the work of writer/director Neil Jordan (Mona Lisa). The new film has a jot of the dreamy atmosphere and mossy texture of Jordan's The Company of Wolves, but for the most part the characters in High Spirits are too drunk to dream and the moss looks suspiciously like mold. It says something that in High Spirits the dead look dewier than the living.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2003 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
From the Polish Brothers, the twins who brought you Twin Falls Idaho, comes Northfork, this one set in neighboring Montana, but like its predecessor a visual sonnet to the heartland. Beautiful but baffling, the film is (I think) an allegory (or maybe a eulogy) to the American wild on the brink of domestication, touched by an angel or four. The visual references of this wide-screen movie are Elia Kazan's Wild River, Edward Curtis' mythic Western landscapes, and Wim Wenders' Wings of Desire.
NEWS
February 20, 1998 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
The version of "The Gingerbread Man" that arrives today belongs to director Robert Altman, who repossessed the movie after the studio tried to make drastic changes. Having seen Altman's movie, I wonder what the studio cut looks like. "The Gingerbread Man" stars Kenneth Branagh as an overly cocky Southern criminal defense lawyer (John Grisham penned the script) who has made a career freeing accused cop-killers, usually by ridiculing the Savannah police and their procedures.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1995 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
From odd couple to maudlin couple and now, as grouchy grandpas, Jack Lemmon and Walter Matthau have embodied most of the ages of man in their venerable screen partnership - 30 years next year. But why these consummate pros stoop to the geriatric equivalent of Porky's is beyond figuring. Grumpier Old Men - the sequel to the 1993 hit - brings back Lemmon and Matthau as Minnesota's crotchetiest ice fishermen. Matthau's the crusty one; Lemmon's the yeasty one. And the object of the film is for each to get a rise out of the other by making the steamiest double entendre.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2004 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Chris Cooper delivers a crafty - and timely - performance in John Sayles' Silver City. As the rich scion of a powerful U.S. senator, the actor's Richard "Dickie" Pilager is running for political office himself: the governorship of Colorado. The novice candidate stands at the podium, bumbling his way through talking points, invoking patriotic platitudes, and casting a worried gaze at his handler (Richard Dreyfuss) whenever a pesky reporter lobs an unexpected query his way. (Dang those journalists!
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2013 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Of the clown, Nietzsche remarked, "He alone suffers so deeply that he had to invent laughter. " He would have spoken similarly of magicians had he seen the raucous, deeply revelatory Elephant Room , which is inaugurating the FringeArts building on Columbus Avenue. At first glance, Elephant Room plays like a trio of middle-aged, washed-up magic-makers performing in their basement "secret society" in Paterson, N.J. With their long hair, porn-star moustaches, and lounge-lizard attire, and strumming and kicking to '80s power ballads, it would be all too easy to dismiss Dennis Diamond, Louie Magic, and Daryl Hannah (Geoff Sobelle, Steve Cuiffo and Trey Lyford)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Epic Records this week went to "great efforts" to remove a leaked recording by Lil Wayne that features lyrics that have deeply offended the family of Emmett Till . The tune, a cover of rapper Future 's "Karate Chop," features pornographic sexual references in its description of the beating death of Till, a 14-year-old Chicago boy tortured and shot in Mississippi in 1955 for supposedly whistling at a white woman. Responding to objections by Till's family, the Rev. Jesse Jackson contacted Lil Wayne's managers with a request to take the song off the Web. "Out of respect for the legacy of Emmett Till and his family . . . we are going through great efforts to take down the unauthorized [remix]
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2012 | By Howard Gensler
ESQUIRE MAGAZINE has chosen Mila Kunis as the "Sexiest Woman Alive," eliminating Rihanna 's bid for a repeat. Now that we can get a picture of Mila in the column and "Sexiest" in our philly.com headline, let's move on.   'Kill Bill' star arrested The stuff you learn writing (and reading) Tattle. We spend so much time tracking Kardashians that all we knew about the Keystone XL Pipeline was that President Obama had nixed it. Turns out, not entirely true.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2007 | By Sam Adams FOR THE INQUIRER
The Brooklyn, N.Y., garage-punk trio the Yeah Yeah Yeahs has never included a bass player, and Thursday's concert at the Electric Factory showed why: There's no room. With guitarist Nick Zinner off to one side and drummer Brian Chase in the back, the band's singer, Karen O, whirled, jumped and rolled around every remaining inch of stage. Woe to anyone who stands in her way. Dressed somewhere between Cabaret's Sally Bowles and Daryl Hannah in Blade Runner, Karen O pounded on her stomach like she was trying to exorcise demons, or maybe rouse them.
NEWS
June 14, 2006 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Police yesterday forcibly removed Kill Bill hottie Daryl Hannah from sittin' in a tree on the grounds of the 14-acre inner city L.A. urban farm that capitalist landowner guy Ralph Horowitz wants to turn into a warehouse. All sorts of celebs have voiced outrage and solidarity and stuff about the situation. (Joan Baez took a tree seat there recently.) Yesterday's protest featured dozens of chanting protesters, who've been squatting on the land to prevent its conversion, and 120 protest-busting deputies.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2004 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Chris Cooper delivers a crafty - and timely - performance in John Sayles' Silver City. As the rich scion of a powerful U.S. senator, the actor's Richard "Dickie" Pilager is running for political office himself: the governorship of Colorado. The novice candidate stands at the podium, bumbling his way through talking points, invoking patriotic platitudes, and casting a worried gaze at his handler (Richard Dreyfuss) whenever a pesky reporter lobs an unexpected query his way. (Dang those journalists!
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2003 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Like most of his movies, John Sayles' Casa de Los Babys is a social mosaic focusing on the tile as well as the big picture. In this case, the writer-director considers the traffic in souls between Latin America and the States. Sayles sees one as a land of economic scarcity nonetheless blessed with a bounty of newborns and the other as a land of plenty nonetheless cursed with reproductive barrenness. Unlike most Sayles movies, the filmmaker no sooner introduces his memorable characters and deeply resonant themes than his From Here to Maternity melodrama abruptly ends.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2003 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
From the Polish Brothers, the twins who brought you Twin Falls Idaho, comes Northfork, this one set in neighboring Montana, but like its predecessor a visual sonnet to the heartland. Beautiful but baffling, the film is (I think) an allegory (or maybe a eulogy) to the American wild on the brink of domestication, touched by an angel or four. The visual references of this wide-screen movie are Elia Kazan's Wild River, Edward Curtis' mythic Western landscapes, and Wim Wenders' Wings of Desire.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2001 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Small-time has rarely been so sublime. In Jackpot, the second installment of a promised trilogy from filmmaking twins Mark and Michael Polish, an aspiring country singer takes to the road with his manager, crisscrossing the West in a pink 1983 Chrysler searching for the American Dream. The fact that Sunny Holiday (Jon Gries) and his manager Lester "Les" Irving (Garrett Morris) have an itinerary consisting of out-of-the-way karaoke bars, and that more often than not the prize money barely covers gas for the car (which they sometimes end up sleeping in)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2001 | By REGINA MEDINA Daily News wire services contributed to this report
LOOK, IT was a movie festival - not her cuddly canine - that beckoned "Splash" siren Daryl Hannah during rehearsals for a London play last year. But Britain's Daily Mirror did blame the pooch and now they're paying for it. The actress won undisclosed libel damages from the newspaper yesterday for publishing a widely copied story claiming she skipped play practice to attend her dog's birthday. The Daily Mirror also apologized to the London High Court for printing the entirely inaccurate story last October.
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