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Data Breach

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NEWS
September 13, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
An unencrypted desktop computer containing personal information on 3,780 patients was stolen during a break-in at a Temple University physicians' office in late July, the university said in a statement Thursday. The computer, in the department of surgery, contained files with patient information that could be used for identity theft, including name, age, billing codes, and, in some cases, the name of the referring physician. The files did not contain Social Security numbers or financial data, according to the university.
NEWS
April 5, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
IF YOU took an ambulance ride between Feb. 1 and Sept. 4, 2012, the Fire Department wants you to keep a close eye on your bank statement. Fire Commissioner Derrick Sawyer announced yesterday that an employee of Intermedix, a company in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. that handles billing services for ambulance agencies, handed over sensitive patient information for use in a tax-return fraud scheme. The data breach was first discovered in 2012, and, at that time, it didn't appear that local EMS data was affected, according to a statement from Sawyer.
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Penn Medicine Tuesday announced a data breach involving receipts from Penn Medicine Rittenhouse that were stolen last month from a locked office in Pennsylvania Hospital. Notifications of the theft were sent to 661 patients Monday, said Susan Phillips, a senior vice president and spokeswoman for the health system. She said no arrests have been made. There have been no instances of identity theft related to theft. Phillips said that was a "very low risk. " Many of the receipts were found on hospital grounds.
BUSINESS
May 5, 2011 | By Joelle Tessler, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The data breach of Sony's PlayStation Network resulted from a "very carefully planned, very professional, highly sophisticated criminal cyber attack designed to steal personal and credit-card information for illegal purposes," a Sony executive says. In a letter to members of the House Commerce Committee released Wednesday, Kazuo Hirai, chairman of Sony Computer Entertainment America L.L.C., defended the company's handling of the breach. Sony disclosed the problem last week.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Could the uproar over Target's vast data breach finally force Americans to get serious about consumers' security? Most of the rest of the world - including Canada and Europe - now uses payment cards embedded with microchips, making them far harder to clone. Almost everywhere, payment cards also are secured by customers' secret PIN codes. Meanwhile, America clings to outmoded magnetic-stripe technology, which makes card cloning much easier for the bad guys. And we blithely issue debit cards - yes, cards that take money from your very own bank account - that are usable with just a signature, no PIN required.
NEWS
April 5, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Billing information for at least 750 patients who used Philadelphia ambulances in 2012 was stolen by an employee of the company that handles such data, the Fire Department said Friday. The company, Intermedix, was first made aware of the data breach, which affected agencies in several states, in 2012, the department said. The thefts were part of a scheme to use the patients' information to file fraudulent tax returns, and the employee is now in jail. In 2012, Philadelphia officials were assured that the breach did not affect them, the department said.
BUSINESS
December 28, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Independence Blue Cross on Friday disclosed a data breach affecting 12,500 of its more than 2.5 million members. Unlike most high-profile cases of personal data loss, such as the one at Target stores last year affecting 70 million people, the IBC case did not involve computers. The incident happened in October, when maintenance workers threw out four boxes of member records that were supposed to be moved from one floor to another at IBC's offices, the company said Friday in a legal notice.
NEWS
October 14, 2012
TD Bank has begun notifying about 260,000 customers from Maine to Florida that it may have been affected by a data breach. Spokeswoman Rebecca Acevedo based in the bank's office in Cherry Hill confirmed in e-mails Friday to the Associated Press that unencrypted backup data tapes were misplaced in transport in March. She said that the tapes contained customers' personal data, including account information and Social Security numbers, but that the company was not aware of any misuse of the information.
BUSINESS
December 25, 2013 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Target Corp., the nation's second-largest discount chain, continued to reel from its disclosure last week of a huge data breach that compromised 40 million credit- or debit-card accounts during the holiday season. Shoppers posted comments last weekend on Target's Facebook page saying the retailer needed to reissue its REDcard credit and debit cards. There were also mentions of long waits for customer service. Craig Johnson, president of the retail consultancy Customer Growth Partners, said Monday that REDcard usage fell over the weekend and more Target shoppers bought with cash.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2011 | By Peter Svensson, Associated Press
NEW YORK - With the possible theft of millions of e-mail addresses from an advertising company, several large companies have started warning customers to expect fraudulent e-mail messages that try to coax account log-in information from them. JPMorgan Chase, Citigroup Inc., Best Buy Co., and other well-known financial and retail companies all say hackers may have learned their customers' e-mail addresses because of a security breach at a Dallas company called Epsilon that manages e-mail communications.
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NEWS
April 5, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
IF YOU took an ambulance ride between Feb. 1 and Sept. 4, 2012, the Fire Department wants you to keep a close eye on your bank statement. Fire Commissioner Derrick Sawyer announced yesterday that an employee of Intermedix, a company in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. that handles billing services for ambulance agencies, handed over sensitive patient information for use in a tax-return fraud scheme. The data breach was first discovered in 2012, and, at that time, it didn't appear that local EMS data was affected, according to a statement from Sawyer.
NEWS
April 5, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Billing information for at least 750 patients who used Philadelphia ambulances in 2012 was stolen by an employee of the company that handles such data, the Fire Department said Friday. The company, Intermedix, was first made aware of the data breach, which affected agencies in several states, in 2012, the department said. The thefts were part of a scheme to use the patients' information to file fraudulent tax returns, and the employee is now in jail. In 2012, Philadelphia officials were assured that the breach did not affect them, the department said.
BUSINESS
December 28, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Independence Blue Cross on Friday disclosed a data breach affecting 12,500 of its more than 2.5 million members. Unlike most high-profile cases of personal data loss, such as the one at Target stores last year affecting 70 million people, the IBC case did not involve computers. The incident happened in October, when maintenance workers threw out four boxes of member records that were supposed to be moved from one floor to another at IBC's offices, the company said Friday in a legal notice.
NEWS
September 13, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
An unencrypted desktop computer containing personal information on 3,780 patients was stolen during a break-in at a Temple University physicians' office in late July, the university said in a statement Thursday. The computer, in the department of surgery, contained files with patient information that could be used for identity theft, including name, age, billing codes, and, in some cases, the name of the referring physician. The files did not contain Social Security numbers or financial data, according to the university.
BUSINESS
September 1, 2014 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Reports of a major data breach at JPMorgan and other banks - possibly by Russian hackers - puts in question the security of customer accounts. What's a consumer to do? Infosecurity magazine runs through the possible methods of the hackers and what the fallout might be. "The FBI has called the skill associated with the attack 'far beyond the capability of ordinary criminal hackers,' leading many to conclude that the action was state-sponsored," writes reporter Tara Seals. The cold implication: "Without significant change in strategy, ultimate resistance to high-level attacks is, well, futile.
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Penn Medicine Tuesday announced a data breach involving receipts from Penn Medicine Rittenhouse that were stolen last month from a locked office in Pennsylvania Hospital. Notifications of the theft were sent to 661 patients Monday, said Susan Phillips, a senior vice president and spokeswoman for the health system. She said no arrests have been made. There have been no instances of identity theft related to theft. Phillips said that was a "very low risk. " Many of the receipts were found on hospital grounds.
NEWS
January 21, 2014
WHEN THIEVES hack a luxury retailer like Neiman Marcus, you know the apocalypse has begun. I mean, security breaches only happen at retailers where struggling working stiffs and the shrinking middle class shop, right? But after the luxury merchant, which operates more than 79 upscale and clearance stores (including three in the Philly area) confirmed that thieves stole some of its customers' payment-card information and made unauthorized charges over the holiday season, it appears that even the flush shoppers are no longer immune from personal-data theft.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Could the uproar over Target's vast data breach finally force Americans to get serious about consumers' security? Most of the rest of the world - including Canada and Europe - now uses payment cards embedded with microchips, making them far harder to clone. Almost everywhere, payment cards also are secured by customers' secret PIN codes. Meanwhile, America clings to outmoded magnetic-stripe technology, which makes card cloning much easier for the bad guys. And we blithely issue debit cards - yes, cards that take money from your very own bank account - that are usable with just a signature, no PIN required.
NEWS
December 27, 2013
T HE DATA breach at Target has a lot of people worried. Information on about 40 million credit- and debit-card accounts was accessed between Nov. 27 and Dec. 15. This included customer names, credit- or debit-card numbers, expiration dates and security codes. Only in-store purchases were affected, according to Target. The company has denied a Reuters report that customers' personal identification numbers, or PINs, were compromised. Q: How can the information about one credit card lead to identity theft?
BUSINESS
December 25, 2013 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Target Corp., the nation's second-largest discount chain, continued to reel from its disclosure last week of a huge data breach that compromised 40 million credit- or debit-card accounts during the holiday season. Shoppers posted comments last weekend on Target's Facebook page saying the retailer needed to reissue its REDcard credit and debit cards. There were also mentions of long waits for customer service. Craig Johnson, president of the retail consultancy Customer Growth Partners, said Monday that REDcard usage fell over the weekend and more Target shoppers bought with cash.
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