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Data Breach

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NEWS
September 13, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
An unencrypted desktop computer containing personal information on 3,780 patients was stolen during a break-in at a Temple University physicians' office in late July, the university said in a statement Thursday. The computer, in the department of surgery, contained files with patient information that could be used for identity theft, including name, age, billing codes, and, in some cases, the name of the referring physician. The files did not contain Social Security numbers or financial data, according to the university.
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Penn Medicine Tuesday announced a data breach involving receipts from Penn Medicine Rittenhouse that were stolen last month from a locked office in Pennsylvania Hospital. Notifications of the theft were sent to 661 patients Monday, said Susan Phillips, a senior vice president and spokeswoman for the health system. She said no arrests have been made. There have been no instances of identity theft related to theft. Phillips said that was a "very low risk. " Many of the receipts were found on hospital grounds.
NEWS
April 5, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
IF YOU took an ambulance ride between Feb. 1 and Sept. 4, 2012, the Fire Department wants you to keep a close eye on your bank statement. Fire Commissioner Derrick Sawyer announced yesterday that an employee of Intermedix, a company in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. that handles billing services for ambulance agencies, handed over sensitive patient information for use in a tax-return fraud scheme. The data breach was first discovered in 2012, and, at that time, it didn't appear that local EMS data was affected, according to a statement from Sawyer.
BUSINESS
May 5, 2011 | By Joelle Tessler, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The data breach of Sony's PlayStation Network resulted from a "very carefully planned, very professional, highly sophisticated criminal cyber attack designed to steal personal and credit-card information for illegal purposes," a Sony executive says. In a letter to members of the House Commerce Committee released Wednesday, Kazuo Hirai, chairman of Sony Computer Entertainment America L.L.C., defended the company's handling of the breach. Sony disclosed the problem last week.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Could the uproar over Target's vast data breach finally force Americans to get serious about consumers' security? Most of the rest of the world - including Canada and Europe - now uses payment cards embedded with microchips, making them far harder to clone. Almost everywhere, payment cards also are secured by customers' secret PIN codes. Meanwhile, America clings to outmoded magnetic-stripe technology, which makes card cloning much easier for the bad guys. And we blithely issue debit cards - yes, cards that take money from your very own bank account - that are usable with just a signature, no PIN required.
NEWS
April 5, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Billing information for at least 750 patients who used Philadelphia ambulances in 2012 was stolen by an employee of the company that handles such data, the Fire Department said Friday. The company, Intermedix, was first made aware of the data breach, which affected agencies in several states, in 2012, the department said. The thefts were part of a scheme to use the patients' information to file fraudulent tax returns, and the employee is now in jail. In 2012, Philadelphia officials were assured that the breach did not affect them, the department said.
BUSINESS
December 28, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Independence Blue Cross on Friday disclosed a data breach affecting 12,500 of its more than 2.5 million members. Unlike most high-profile cases of personal data loss, such as the one at Target stores last year affecting 70 million people, the IBC case did not involve computers. The incident happened in October, when maintenance workers threw out four boxes of member records that were supposed to be moved from one floor to another at IBC's offices, the company said Friday in a legal notice.
NEWS
December 21, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Staff Writer
Joshua Uretsky, the Philadelphia man fired as data chief for presidential candidate Bernie Sanders after a controversial data breach involving Hillary Clinton's campaign, is an idealist and a progressive but not someone who would do something untoward to gain electoral advantage, friends and associates said Saturday. They defended the 39-year-old Fishtown man against allegations that Uretsky and other Sanders staffers had tampered with the front-runner's confidential voter data Thursday after a security firewall temporarily vanished on the shared system the party and its candidates use to store voter data.
BUSINESS
December 21, 2015
Kids out of school for the holidays? You could take them to the Star Wars film at the Franklin Institute's IMAX theater. They could amble through the heart's arteries or marvel at stars in the planetarium. Or they could gaze at Jamie Maguire's hair stuck to a bicycle helmet. Why is his hair and helmet on display? Consider it an object lesson. The reason James "Jamie" Maguire Jr., 55, was able to give $1.5 million to the Franklin Institute was, in part, because the helmet saved his life in a bicycle crash last year.
NEWS
October 14, 2012
TD Bank has begun notifying about 260,000 customers from Maine to Florida that it may have been affected by a data breach. Spokeswoman Rebecca Acevedo based in the bank's office in Cherry Hill confirmed in e-mails Friday to the Associated Press that unencrypted backup data tapes were misplaced in transport in March. She said that the tapes contained customers' personal data, including account information and Social Security numbers, but that the company was not aware of any misuse of the information.
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NEWS
December 29, 2015 | By Chris Brennan, Inquirer Columnist
The Democratic National Committee is known in politics as the DNC, but someone inside the Bernie Sanders presidential campaign hoped you might mistake it for Damn Nefarious Conspirators . I say someone because the person who floated a conspiracy theory to Yahoo.com for a story that appeared Friday was identified only as "a top Sanders campaign adviser. " This is the latest - and possibly the weirdest - installment in the recent voter-data computer controversy surrounding the Democratic candidates for president.
BUSINESS
December 21, 2015
Kids out of school for the holidays? You could take them to the Star Wars film at the Franklin Institute's IMAX theater. They could amble through the heart's arteries or marvel at stars in the planetarium. Or they could gaze at Jamie Maguire's hair stuck to a bicycle helmet. Why is his hair and helmet on display? Consider it an object lesson. The reason James "Jamie" Maguire Jr., 55, was able to give $1.5 million to the Franklin Institute was, in part, because the helmet saved his life in a bicycle crash last year.
NEWS
December 21, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Staff Writer
Joshua Uretsky, the Philadelphia man fired as data chief for presidential candidate Bernie Sanders after a controversial data breach involving Hillary Clinton's campaign, is an idealist and a progressive but not someone who would do something untoward to gain electoral advantage, friends and associates said Saturday. They defended the 39-year-old Fishtown man against allegations that Uretsky and other Sanders staffers had tampered with the front-runner's confidential voter data Thursday after a security firewall temporarily vanished on the shared system the party and its candidates use to store voter data.
NEWS
August 21, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
TATTLE COULDN'T NAME YOU too many Duggars, except we'd guess a lot of "J" names, but there's no question Josh is our favorite. Or should that be least favorite? And should he change his name from "Josh" to "Jerk"? Calling himself "the biggest hypocrite ever," the ex-reality star has apologized for a "secret addiction" to pornography and for cheating on his wife. "While espousing faith and family values, I have secretly over the last several years been viewing pornography on the internet and this became a secret addiction and I became unfaithful to my wife," he said in a statement posted to, and later removed from, the family's website yesterday.
NEWS
July 30, 2015
IT WAS NEVER a matter of if , but when . As soon as the news broke about two major hacking incidents at the Office of Personnel Management, I knew what would come next. And I knew it wouldn't be immediate cases of identity theft. It could be months, if not years, before identity thieves victimize employees whose information was compromised. They know people are more vigilant at the beginning. So they wait until everyone calms down. But other scammers strike quickly when a data breach is disclosed.
NEWS
July 21, 2015
ISSUE | DATA BREACH Burned before As one of the 21.5 million people affected by the Office of Personnel Management data breach, I am far from comforted by the government's response. First, this is not the only time the OPM has adversely affected my life. Due to its temporary loss of my security clearance paperwork, I was let go from a government assignment after only three weeks. Second, I have grave doubts about the firm that the OPM retained to provide credit monitoring, since it seems to be passing the actual work on to an even less experienced firm.
NEWS
April 5, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
IF YOU took an ambulance ride between Feb. 1 and Sept. 4, 2012, the Fire Department wants you to keep a close eye on your bank statement. Fire Commissioner Derrick Sawyer announced yesterday that an employee of Intermedix, a company in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. that handles billing services for ambulance agencies, handed over sensitive patient information for use in a tax-return fraud scheme. The data breach was first discovered in 2012, and, at that time, it didn't appear that local EMS data was affected, according to a statement from Sawyer.
NEWS
April 5, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Billing information for at least 750 patients who used Philadelphia ambulances in 2012 was stolen by an employee of the company that handles such data, the Fire Department said Friday. The company, Intermedix, was first made aware of the data breach, which affected agencies in several states, in 2012, the department said. The thefts were part of a scheme to use the patients' information to file fraudulent tax returns, and the employee is now in jail. In 2012, Philadelphia officials were assured that the breach did not affect them, the department said.
BUSINESS
December 28, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Independence Blue Cross on Friday disclosed a data breach affecting 12,500 of its more than 2.5 million members. Unlike most high-profile cases of personal data loss, such as the one at Target stores last year affecting 70 million people, the IBC case did not involve computers. The incident happened in October, when maintenance workers threw out four boxes of member records that were supposed to be moved from one floor to another at IBC's offices, the company said Friday in a legal notice.
NEWS
September 13, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
An unencrypted desktop computer containing personal information on 3,780 patients was stolen during a break-in at a Temple University physicians' office in late July, the university said in a statement Thursday. The computer, in the department of surgery, contained files with patient information that could be used for identity theft, including name, age, billing codes, and, in some cases, the name of the referring physician. The files did not contain Social Security numbers or financial data, according to the university.
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