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Dave Raymond

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SPORTS
December 19, 1993 | By Jayson Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He was just a guy dressed in a big green bird suit. Except that Dave Raymond made that big green bird the most beloved sports figure in Philadelphia. And the true testament to his genius is the number of people all over America who said, "I don't like mascots, but . . . " No matter how you felt about mascots in general, it was practically impossible not to appreciate the hilarious creative brilliance with which Dave Raymond portrayed the Phillie Phanatic over the last 16 years.
NEWS
May 22, 1987 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
He looks like Astroturf sprung to life. He's got a megaphone mouth, startled eyes and a waddle when he walks, and for eight seasons of baseball he's been leaving Phillies fans laughing in the aisles. The Phillies' management insists that the team's mascot, the Phillie Phanatic, is really a guy in a costume. They even claim that a guy named Dave Raymond has been playing him all these years. But after eight years the Phanatic has become more than just a guy in a green suit. The Phanatic, well . . . he's real.
SPORTS
December 15, 1993 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writer Sam Carchidi contributed to this article
Dave Raymond, who for 16 years has animated the happy green fuzz known as the Phillie Phanatic, said yesterday that he is hanging up his costume to start a sports mascot and marketing company of his own. "It was inevitable; I just couldn't keep on doing it the rest of my life," said Raymond, 37, who, after weekend reports of his impending departure, formally announced yesterday that he is retiring as the full-time Phillies mascot. Raymond's Phanatic, along with the famed San Diego Chicken, inspired a host of imitators, and costumed mascots proliferated at sporting events across the country beginning in the late 1970s.
NEWS
August 6, 1992 | By Don Beideman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After going through high school with the nickname "Chickenhead," Bill Keffer said it figured that he would wind up with a job as pinch-hitter for the Phillie Phanatic. Actually, he is the pinch-hitter for the pinch-hitter for the Phanatic. The 25-year-old Episcopal Academy graduate and Ardmore resident, who claims it pays well to act like an idiot, serves as the No. 3 Phanatic behind Dave Raymond and Tom Burgoyne, the full-time members of the Phillies promotion department. Raymond is the original person behind the hairy green suit of the team's highly popular mascot.
SPORTS
November 22, 2011 | BY RICH HOFMANN, hofmanr@phillynews.com
THE PEOPLE have spoken: Hip Hop is no more. Seeing as how there is no actual basketball to talk about during the NBA lockout, this qualifies as big Sixers news. After receiving hundreds of communications from fans, nearly all of them advocating the end of a symbol of a different era, the team's new ownership will announce today that the never-beloved mascot has been put out to pasture, literally. To spare the sensibilities of the one or two children who weren't scared to death by the rabbit, the team will say that Hip Hop fell in love, married and moved away to start a family.
SPORTS
March 1, 1994 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's 20 degrees and dropping and a northeast wind is blowing off hats and bending trees. A rough coat of ice grips the ground beneath three inches of new snow. It's a dark winter night in Reading. Tom Burgoyne, age 28, a 1988 Drexel graduate, is undressing in the back of a van outside the Sheridan-Berskhire hotel. He strips to his shorts and T- shirt, slips into a green, $15,000, six-piece, 35-pound costume, then bursts out the door onto the parking lot and waddles quickly to the hotel entrance - a clever, mischievous furry green creature that has become one of the best-loved mascots in all the sports world.
NEWS
August 17, 2005
TO OUR MIND, the absolute Greatest Moment in Mascot History, a growing body of knowledge and culture that spans professional and collegiate sports, as well as the corporate world, was right here in Philadelphia in 1993. The Phillies were playing Atlanta for the pennant. Ted Turner, who owns the Braves, was married to Jane Fonda. The corpulent Phillie Phanatic showed up in a purple leotard to do an insanely funny take-off on her workout routine. For that, and thousands of hugs and dances and silly gags since 1978, the Phanatic was inducted yesterday into the Mascot Hall of Fame at a rain-drenched ceremony across from City Hall that drew 40 furry and foam mascots, as well as a few hardy Philadelphians.
SPORTS
December 6, 2011
The Sixers' new ownership decided pretty early on that Hip Hop was going to be no more. That was backed up by overwhelmingly negative reaction from fans. The team announced the move 2 weeks ago, saying it had hired Jim Henson's Creature Shop and Raymond Entertainment Group, founded by Dave Raymond, the former Phillie Phanatic. The owners wanted to go with a colonial theme, but realized there is not an obvious tie-in with the 76ers name. They also wanted to stress an element of Ben Franklin.
NEWS
August 30, 1993 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Staff Writer
Dave Raymond pulls his trousers on one leg at a time when he dresses for work, just like the rest of us. Then, unlike the rest of us, the Phillie Phanatic's alter ego completes his dress-for-success ensemble with a shaggy synthetic suit the color of faded Astroturf, a bug-eyed headpiece and size 56 sneakers. He does this more than 200 times a year. "I wash the costume at home in the bathtub full of Woolite," said Raymond, 37, who decamps to a modest ranch house in north Wilmington when he's not on the road.
NEWS
April 12, 1993 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Staff Writer
"Pinch-hitting for Dave Raymond . . . Tom Burgoyne. " You won't hear this announcement at Veteran's Stadium, because Raymond - a/ k/a the Phillie Phanatic - is on the lineup card for all 81 home games. But the Phanatic is so popular that Raymond alone can't fulfill his Iron Man schedule, which calls for an additional 300 appearances a year outside the Vet. Enter Tom Burgoyne, backup Phanatic. "Any function where you want the Phanatic, that's where I go," says the cheerful Burgoyne, 27, a Mount Airy resident who works in the Phillies' marketing office.
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NEWS
March 12, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Five years after starting a team, the Philadelphia Union is contemplating a step that could boost or diminish its rising image: Picking a mascot. In recent months, team officials have used a survey and focus group to ask its fans about potential mascots. Chief executive officer Nick Sakiewicz declined to share details from the discussions or describe the options, and said he was in no rush to do so. "When it feels right and we can do it in a first-class manner, we'll do it," Sakiewicz said last week.
NEWS
December 11, 2011 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
Would I let my children sleep with a stuffed stringy-haired codger like Ben Franklin? Or do I prefer they cuddle nonhuman furry friends? All politics is local, even contests pitting a Founding Father against a top-heavy hound and a 7-foot moose. So when contemplating which costumed creature should next represent the Philadelphia 76ers, I admit my misgivings involve merchandise: If I'm invariably going to spend $29.99 on a Sixers Pillow Pet, which of these plush playthings is least likely to give my kids nightmares?
SPORTS
December 6, 2011
The Sixers' new ownership decided pretty early on that Hip Hop was going to be no more. That was backed up by overwhelmingly negative reaction from fans. The team announced the move 2 weeks ago, saying it had hired Jim Henson's Creature Shop and Raymond Entertainment Group, founded by Dave Raymond, the former Phillie Phanatic. The owners wanted to go with a colonial theme, but realized there is not an obvious tie-in with the 76ers name. They also wanted to stress an element of Ben Franklin.
SPORTS
November 22, 2011 | BY RICH HOFMANN, hofmanr@phillynews.com
THE PEOPLE have spoken: Hip Hop is no more. Seeing as how there is no actual basketball to talk about during the NBA lockout, this qualifies as big Sixers news. After receiving hundreds of communications from fans, nearly all of them advocating the end of a symbol of a different era, the team's new ownership will announce today that the never-beloved mascot has been put out to pasture, literally. To spare the sensibilities of the one or two children who weren't scared to death by the rabbit, the team will say that Hip Hop fell in love, married and moved away to start a family.
NEWS
January 31, 2008 | By Will Hobson FOR THE INQUIRER
Visitors to Immaculata University basketball games this season may have noticed a new member of the Mighty Macs fan base - a 6-foot, 250-pound, gray-and-white Scottie dog, sporting a blue-and-white Immaculata jersey and matching sneakers. That's Mac, the new Immaculata mascot, enjoying its (Mac is gender neutral) first school year stalking the sideline for the Mighty Macs. When university officials decided in 2006 to revive Immaculata's mascot, they turned to the creator of the character behind perhaps the greatest mascot in sports history (apologies to the San Diego Chicken)
NEWS
January 16, 2008 | By Michael Klein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Phillie Phanatic is the top mascot in sports, according to a market research group whose findings were reported yesterday on Forbes.com. The Phanatic - which edged out the modern era's pioneer figurehead, the San Diego Chicken, for No. 1 on The Marketing Arm's Davie-Brown Index - "became an instant smash when it debuted for the Phillies in 1978. " Tom Burgoyne, who has known the Phanatic inside and out since 1994, squealed with delight at the news. Then he asked: "This isn't the same Forbes list that Oprah and Bill Gates are on?"
NEWS
August 17, 2005
TO OUR MIND, the absolute Greatest Moment in Mascot History, a growing body of knowledge and culture that spans professional and collegiate sports, as well as the corporate world, was right here in Philadelphia in 1993. The Phillies were playing Atlanta for the pennant. Ted Turner, who owns the Braves, was married to Jane Fonda. The corpulent Phillie Phanatic showed up in a purple leotard to do an insanely funny take-off on her workout routine. For that, and thousands of hugs and dances and silly gags since 1978, the Phanatic was inducted yesterday into the Mascot Hall of Fame at a rain-drenched ceremony across from City Hall that drew 40 furry and foam mascots, as well as a few hardy Philadelphians.
SPORTS
January 19, 1996 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Frank Sullivan might be the only ex-Phillie who never had a bad day at the ballpark. He made people laugh, made them feel good, helped take their minds off games that sometimes were dreadful. He also assured they would be rewarded for showing up early. Sullivan, 65, died Wednesday of complications from liver disease. For 23 years, he was the Phillies' director of promotions. He gave you Kiteman, fireworks, camera night, national anthem singers, workouts by Little League teams, Karl Wallenda walking a tightrope from foul line to foul line high above the playing field, giveaways, Benny the Human Bomb . . . Most of all, he helped to give you the Phillie Phanatic.
NEWS
May 11, 1995 | By L. Stuart Ditzen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dressed preposterously as a huge shaggy creature, the thing was attacking people at a church fair in Northeast Philadelphia. It was molesting, harassing, assaulting, battering and, in the language of the law, "engaging in unlawful or offensive touching. " Yes, young and old alike got a good dose of the Phillie Phanatic at the Maternity Blessed Virgin Mary Catholic Church carnival back on May 15, 1991. One man, a retired bus driver with back problems, says he got a bigger dose than he wanted.
SPORTS
April 13, 1994 | By Michael Vitez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The challenge came early, in the second inning. A bunch of wise guys in Section 348 began to chant: "We want Dave. We want Dave. " Dave Raymond, the old, original Phillie Phanatic, had retired in November, after 16 seasons. Tom Burgoyne, the new Phanatic, was making his debut. And Burgoyne was ready. He emptied a can of Super String on the head heckler, Robert Mecoli, 36, of South Philadelphia, on Monday afternoon as the entire section erupted in laughter. Mecoli spent the rest of the inning removing green goop from his hair.
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