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David Bowie

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1995 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
A rock star trying to halt a decade-long slide has several options: Do a hits tour, a "farewell" tour, or form a new band with the goal of updating the sound. David Bowie has been there, done that - and every strategy has failed miserably. So for the concert experience he brought to Camden's Waterfront Entertainment Centre Friday, he tried something even more transparent: He enlisted currently hot Nine Inch Nails as his opening act, desperately hoping that some of that band's credibility with the alternative-rock audience would rub off. It didn't.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1997 | By Faith Quintavell, FOR THE INQUIRER
David Bowie played larger-than-life characters in his heyday - a glamorous gender-bender, an alienated spaceman, a drug-addled everyman with a wicked saxophone - but there was always a grain of truth in them. It always seemed Bowie wasn't too far behind the mask, feeling alienated, experimenting with drugs and bisexuality, an unconventional seeker of truth. And the musical forms he used - disco, synth-pop, blues - artfully conveyed emotions appropriate to his characters. But sometimes riotous youthful quest ends in serene self-awareness, and at 50, Bowie is apparently there.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1987 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Given the mediocrity of his recent work, it's a pleasant shock to discover that David Bowie's new album Never Let Me Down (EMI America ) is quite good. Bowie said recently that he strove to include "every style I've ever recorded," and they're all there, from thumping hard rock to smooth neo- disco. This being Bowie, there's a campy low point, a "rap" duet with actor Mickey Rourke, but songs such as "Zeroes" and "Never Let Me Down" can stand with his finest work. James Carr At the Dark End of the Street (Blue Side )
NEWS
January 13, 2016 | BY JASON NARK, Staff Writer
SOMEONE KNELT down by the side door to Doobie's Bar on Monday afternoon and wrote condolences in pink chalk, a little note for the lady inside whose idol had joined the stardust. And the stars look very different today. A little heart was drawn at the end. When Patti Brett opened the door and stepped outside in her "David Meowie" shirt and saw the lyrics from David Bowie's "Space Oddity" written across her step and the flowers stuffed into a wreath on the door, she held her hand to her mouth and fought back tears.
NEWS
July 22, 1998 | By Francesca Chapman Daily News wire services contributed to this report
Glam rock pioneer David Bowie showed some entrepreneurial flair last year when he launched a lucrative bond issue based on his own musical catalog. Onward and upward! Now Bowie wants to be the next America Online. The star is setting up an internet service provider, which will give subscribers net and e-mail access plus some entertaiment perks. The price is expected to be a relatively competitive $19.95 a month. "I wanted to create an environment where not just my fans but all music lovers could be a part of the same community," Bowie said.
NEWS
January 13, 2016 | By Dan DeLuca, STAFF MUSIC CRITIC
Overstating David Bowie's impact on pop music and popular culture is difficult to do. Bowie, who died Sunday after an 18-month struggle with liver cancer - just two days after releasing his hauntingly powerful album Blackstar on his 69th birthday - was not among the first generation of rock stars. The British singer and songwriter was born David Jones but renamed himself after Alamo hero Jim Bowie, in part to avoid confusion with Davy Jones of the Monkees. He grew up in the diverse Brixton section of South London and studied dance, avant-garde theater, and mime in the mid-1960s while aspiring to Beatles-like pop stardom.
NEWS
January 13, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Staff Writer
Turn and face the strange. Defy the status quo. And market, market, market yourself all the way to death's door. David Bowie did all that, constantly laughing at convention, and (sometimes) all the way to the bank. A great influence in music and fashion, he carried equal weight as a financial innovator. He was an art and business project forever in flux. Ziggy had a zig for every zag. In the early 1970s, he answered social consciousness with androgyny. Later, when it was hip to diss disco, he embraced it. Even rock bastions like WMMR, WIOQ, and WYSP were forced to play "Young Americans.
NEWS
January 18, 2016 | Dan DeLuca, Staff Writer
David Bowie's death last week played out like the final, showstopping performance of a career full of unpredictable star turns. His last mournful, mysterious album, Blackstar , was released to unanimous praise on his 69th birthday, Jan. 8. Two days later, he was gone. That sudden surprise - planet Earth was blue, and there was nothing we could do - focused attention in a spectacular demonstration of the connective power of music and the Internet. Facebook logged 100 million interactions in 12 hours after Bowie's passing.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR DoTHIS
Ever since Kevin Barnes formed Of Montreal 20 years ago in Athens, Ga., he and his decorous band have morphed through all genres and gender identifications. The band has done it all: dreamy Elephant 6 collective pop, swooning 1960s psychedelia, curt 1970s funk, gilded glam, blue-denim country, prog rock, 1980s electronica. The one element that courses through Of Montreal's 13 full lengths, though, is Barnes' warm and wordy frankness. Of Montreal (stylized as of Montreal ) has just released its EDM-tinged Innocence Reaches . Barnes has just come off a recent divorce, and two of his musical heroes - David Bowie and Prince - have died.
NEWS
August 14, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, Classical Music Critic
Last year, he was a rock star. This year, David Bowie is officially a dead composer. But is he a Dead Great Composer, like Beethoven? Well, he was treated like a DGC this summer at the BBC Proms, one of the most prestigious summer classical festivals in the world, held at London's Royal Albert Hall. Artists from senior-citizen rocker John Cale to 38-year-old French opera singer Philippe Jaroussky gathered to form what was called the Stargaze ensemble to discover what one of the hosts called "another side of David Bowie.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR DoTHIS
Just because his father is Waylon Jennings and his mother is Jessi Colter doesn't mean you should call Shooter Jennings an outlaw. The genre-jumping musician, loping vocalist, and provocative lyricist is barely even country, what with his leaps into dystopian hard rock ( Black Ribbons ), sleek arena blues ( Electric Rodeo ), and smoked-hammy Euro disco (the recently released Countach (For Giorgio) , a tribute to Giorgio Moroder). Still, he knows that you're out there, digging on his EP of George Jones covers, Don't Wait Up (For George)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Avant-pop specialist Jherek Bischoff has brought his orchestral sense of quirk to everything he's done as a player, arranger, or producer. That includes his legendary 2012 chamber-pop solo piece, Composed ; his work with theatrical vocalist/pianist Amanda Palmer; and his arrangements on 2014's Changing Light from Mirah, an equally audacious composer with whom Bischoff shares a Boot & Saddle stage this week. He recently performed with Palmer at Radio City Music Hall for a David Bowie tribute.
NEWS
May 2, 2016 | By Dan DeLuca, Music Critic
In 2016, I've had to abandon my long-held, entirely nonscientific theory about the timing of the deaths of much-loved musicians. It's not the they-come-in-threes theory, which, if true, might provide solace in a year when David Bowie, Merle Haggard, and Prince have been lost. If that numerological reasoning holds true, maybe there won't be any more enormously influential titans exiting for a while. No, my theory was calendrical. They die in December, it always seemed to me. That idea is partly based on the memory of the most shocking rock death - John Lennon's assassination in December 1980 - as well as a long list of others who left as days grew short.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2016 | Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Kanye West hates on Swift "She not cool no more,"  Narcissist-in-Chief Kanye West , 38, said of  Taylor Swift  during a profanity-laced rant on stage Tuesday at an L.A. club where he performed tunes from his new album,  The Life of Pablo . "She had two seconds to be cool, and she [bleeped] it up. " A self-anointed genius,  Mr.   Kim Kardashian  has no need to go all vampire on other artists' reputations to make his own. People mag says Swift, 26, did not shrivel up and die: She was all smiles as she shopped at Isabel Marant's Melrose boutique.
NEWS
February 14, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
As far as hip-hop's cult of personality goes, Fetty Wap, of Paterson, N.J., has it all sewn up. He's an anomaly - a guy who sing-speaks melodic, licentious, East Coast gangsta-rap love songs, but doesn't allow guns in his videos. A handsome young man, he isn't afraid to show off the ocular prosthesis where his left eye was before it was damaged by glaucoma in childhood. Fetty Wap made the summer of 2015 his personal jukebox with back-to-back Top 10 hits such as "679," "Again," and "My Way," yet he still manages to seem like an underground sensation with hard-banging trap beats as deep as his regard for Lambos.
NEWS
February 4, 2016
By Paul Halpern In January, the world of music lost several giants known as much for their hit songwriting as for their multi-decade performance careers: David Bowie, Paul Kantner of Jefferson Airplane, and Glenn Frey of the Eagles. When luminaries pass away within weeks of each other, articles often appear attempting to find commonalities - sometimes real, other times contrived. In the case of Bowie and Kantner, there is indeed a deep cosmic connection. Both were avid readers who loved science fiction, popular science, and outer-space themes.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2016
Conscious uncoupling pays off We mocked Gwyneth Paltrow when she declared in 2014 that she and then-husband Chris Martin were parting ways in a super-amicable process called "conscious uncoupling. " There will be no acrimony, the duo said, but a harmonious divorce that would save their kids, Apple and Moses , from unnecessary trauma. The strategy worked wonders and the duo are still close friends, Gwyn says. "If you can't stay married, wouldn't the ideal be that you could still be a family and you could put aside your own stuff long enough to explore - what is this new family and who am I in it?"
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2016 | By Howard Gensler
"KUNG FU PANDA 3" chopped all competitors down to size this past weekend, dominating the North American box office with a respectable $41 million, according to Rentrak estimates. The animated sequel fared much better than the weekend's other new openers: "The Finest Hours" debuted in fourth place with $10.3 million, "Fifty Shades of Black" earned a modest $6.2 million, "Jane Got a Gun" brought in only $803,000. Someone's getting a write-off. "The Revenant" and "Star Wars: The Force Awakens" took second and third place with $12.4 million and $10.8 million, respectively.
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