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David Bradley

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NEWS
May 18, 1996 | By Howard Goodman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
David Bradley is one of Philadelphia's best-known novelists. But little in his fiction can be much stranger than his real-life predicament at Temple University. Unhappy over orders to teach an extra course this school year, Bradley, a professor of English, "simply didn't show up" for two courses to which he had been assigned last January, said Carolyn Adams, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. And so - in a move supposedly unthinkable in college circles - Bradley, a tenured professor for more than a decade, has been stripped of his tenure and fired.
NEWS
April 25, 1997 | By Nita Lelyveld, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Temple University has won the first skirmish in a dispute with an award-winning author who said he was unfairly fired from his tenured faculty position after refusing to teach an additional course last year. An independent arbitrator ruled in Temple's favor in a grievance filed by English professor David Bradley, saying that the university had the right to withhold Bradley's $80,000 annual salary when he failed to meet his teaching responsibilities, Temple announced yesterday. "One of the most firmly established arbitral principles is management's right to direct the workforce," arbitrator Randall J. Gebhardt said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
*  BROADCHURCH. 10 p.m. tomorrow, BBC America. IMITATION MAY be the sincerest form of flattery, but in television, inspiration's the better way to go. The Danish series "Forbrydelsen" - an international sensasation most Americans haven't gotten to see - led to a U.S. series, AMC's "The Killing," whose first two seasons proved disappointing. To put it mildly. But Season 3, which ended Sunday, was an often-remarkable 12 hours of television that took the homicide detectives played by Mireille Enos and Joel Kinnaman in a direction dictated by U.S. showrunner Veena Sud, not the Danish original, and included a haunting performance by Peter Sarsgaard as a death row inmate.
NEWS
April 11, 2016 | By Ronnie Polaneczky
I'M SO sorry to tell you this, but the best play in town right now is one you probably won't get to see. It's called A Fierce Kind of Love , and everyone in Philly should experience it. But its 10-day run at the 100-seat theater at Christ Church Neighborhood House has already sold out. So this is a plea for a Fairy Godfunder with deep compassion and deeper pockets to figure out how to extend the play's run. Because this extraordinary production...
NEWS
May 31, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
What is it?: Salt water taffy is that chewy sweet treat that comes in an abundance of flavors, from simple chocolate or vanilla to newfangled ones like sour cherry and wild banana, and lollipop colors wrapped up in twisted-end waxed paper. Boxes of it touting various vacation locales on the outside are as common as souvenir gifts as fruitcakes at Christmas. How it found its way to New Jersey: The lore at the Jersey Shore is that salt water taffy was invented by Atlantic City Boardwalk confectioner David Bradley.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2001 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Kristian Levring's The King Is Alive is the latest offering from Denmark's Dogma 95 school of filmmaking, a movement whose participating directors believe in addition by subtraction. By shunning gimmickry and restricting themselves to natural lighting and the props they find on location, they have produced such provocative and striking works as Celebration and Mifune. Bolder and more experimental, Levring's film has its flaws, but remains a fascinating and strangely involving piece.
NEWS
March 25, 1998 | By Sonia Krishnan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
David Bradley, a 1988 graduate of Plymouth-Whitemarsh High School, was shot to death Monday morning in Richmond, Calif., while he and a coworker stood at a lunch wagon outside the chemical plant where they worked. The gunman, Edilberto Sangco of Vallejo, Calif., a disgruntled employee of the company, then shot himself fatally in the head, said police in Richmond, just north of San Francisco. According to police, Sangco was just coming back to work after a five-day suspension.
NEWS
September 19, 1994 | By Bill Doherty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Never underestimate the power of aspirin. Just ask senior tailback David Bradley of Monsignor Bonner. Early last week, there was doubt that Bradley would play against Glen Mills. His hip was throbbing; his ankle was sprained. Bradley's solution? Aspirin and plenty of bed rest. It worked. Bradley carried the ball eight times for 143 yards and scored two of visiting Bonner's three touchdowns in its 19-18 victory over the Bulls in football Friday night. "David Bradley was amazing," said Bonner coach Stumpy Coyne, whose team improved to 1-2. "He was in a lot of pain early in the week, between his hip- flexor injury and his bad ankle.
NEWS
June 2, 1989 | By Laurie T. Conrad, Special to The Inquirer
A Philadelphia man was found guilty yesterday of vehicular homicide and drunken driving in the deaths of two Bucks County women killed in a head-on collision in December. David Bradley, 24, of West Nedro Avenue, grimaced slightly as a Bucks County Court jury pronounced him guilty of all charges in the Dec. 24 accident that killed Lisa J. Wagenheiser, 24, of Warminster, and Theodora H. Simmons, 23, of Upper Southampton. The victims' families showed little emotion as the verdict was read.
NEWS
January 5, 1989 | By S. E. Siebert, Special to The Inquirer
A preliminary hearing was scheduled this afternoon for a Feasterville man who was charged with vehicular homicide in a Christmas weekend collision that killed two Bucks County women in Upper Southampton Township, according to police. David Bradley was charged with two counts of homicide by vehicle while under the influence of a controlled substance and two counts of involuntary manslaughter in connection with the fatal crash Dec. 24. Bradley, 24, surrendered to Upper Southampton police last Thursday, one day after he was discharged from Warminster General Hospital and Medical Center.
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NEWS
April 11, 2016 | By Ronnie Polaneczky
I'M SO sorry to tell you this, but the best play in town right now is one you probably won't get to see. It's called A Fierce Kind of Love , and everyone in Philly should experience it. But its 10-day run at the 100-seat theater at Christ Church Neighborhood House has already sold out. So this is a plea for a Fairy Godfunder with deep compassion and deeper pockets to figure out how to extend the play's run. Because this extraordinary production...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Audrey "Dee" Coccia had to fight just to get her daughter Gina into public school in the 1970s. And then, after Gina was finally enrolled at age 11, Coccia had to fight for basics, like speech therapy. "They told me my daughter would never benefit from services, so why would they give them to her?" said Coccia, of Philadelphia's Somerton section. "Some of us have fought a long time," she said. "In the beginning, you either went to a state institution or you stayed home and had nothing.
NEWS
May 31, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
What is it?: Salt water taffy is that chewy sweet treat that comes in an abundance of flavors, from simple chocolate or vanilla to newfangled ones like sour cherry and wild banana, and lollipop colors wrapped up in twisted-end waxed paper. Boxes of it touting various vacation locales on the outside are as common as souvenir gifts as fruitcakes at Christmas. How it found its way to New Jersey: The lore at the Jersey Shore is that salt water taffy was invented by Atlantic City Boardwalk confectioner David Bradley.
NEWS
July 11, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* THE STRAIN. 10 p.m. Sunday, FX. * MASTERS OF SEX. 10 p.m. Sunday, Showtime. * RAY DONOVAN. 9 p.m. Sunday, Showtime. THERE'S a line in the fourth episode of FX's "The Strain" that sums up TV's latest vampire drama: "It's not for everyone. " The speaker's referring to a very specific something else that I wouldn't think of spoiling, but for me, saying that "The Strain" is "not for everyone" turned out to mean something different after four episodes than it would have after one. And, yes, I'm afraid this is another of those TV shows that only gets good - or at least begins to show its true colors - a few episodes in. Based on the book trilogy by Guillermo del Toro ("Pacific Rim")
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Every play hopes to be timely. And many playwrights want to change the world. The Exonerated , now in a stirring production by Delaware Theatre Company, goes after both goals. Jessica Blank and Erik Jensen's play tells fact-based stories of five men and one woman sentenced to death and later exonerated, many after serving lengthy sentences. In mostly direct address, we hear the words of Delbert Tibbs (David Alan Anderson), Kerry Max Cook (Tony Lawton), Robert Hayes (Akeem Davis)
NEWS
November 22, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
* AN ADVENTURE IN SPACE AND TIME. 9 tonight, BBC America.   TELEVISION marks a less somber anniversary this weekend as BBC America celebrates the birthday of "Doctor Who," the long-running British sci-fi show about a time-traveler that's been keeping a series of actors employed - on and off - for 50 years. Tomorrow's the actual anniversary and will include, among other things, a global simulcast at 2:50 p.m. of "Doctor Who: The Day of the Doctor," an episode featuring not only the current Doctor, Matt Smith, but his popular predecessor, David Tennant.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
*  BROADCHURCH. 10 p.m. tomorrow, BBC America. IMITATION MAY be the sincerest form of flattery, but in television, inspiration's the better way to go. The Danish series "Forbrydelsen" - an international sensasation most Americans haven't gotten to see - led to a U.S. series, AMC's "The Killing," whose first two seasons proved disappointing. To put it mildly. But Season 3, which ended Sunday, was an often-remarkable 12 hours of television that took the homicide detectives played by Mireille Enos and Joel Kinnaman in a direction dictated by U.S. showrunner Veena Sud, not the Danish original, and included a haunting performance by Peter Sarsgaard as a death row inmate.
NEWS
December 15, 2002 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
David Bradley was gunned down by a fellow employee at General Chemical Corp. in Richmond, Calif., four years ago. Since then, friends of the Plymouth Whitemarsh High School and Lehigh University graduate have raised tens of thousands of dollars every year in his name for a special program at the Wissahickon Hospice. At this year's event in San Francisco, the David Bradley Foundation raised about $13,000 for the David Bradley Children's Bereavement Program, begun in 1998, said Amy Zabele, a social worker at the hospice who runs the program.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2001 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Kristian Levring's The King Is Alive is the latest offering from Denmark's Dogma 95 school of filmmaking, a movement whose participating directors believe in addition by subtraction. By shunning gimmickry and restricting themselves to natural lighting and the props they find on location, they have produced such provocative and striking works as Celebration and Mifune. Bolder and more experimental, Levring's film has its flaws, but remains a fascinating and strangely involving piece.
SPORTS
April 7, 2001 | by Dick Jerardi Daily News Sports Writer
There was no suspense when Villanova center Michael Bradley walked into the Ski Lodge media room yesterday morning. Everybody knew he was there to declare his intention to enter the NBA draft. Clearly, after an odyssey that had taken him to three colleges (sort of) and five coaches (sort of), it was time for Bradley to decide what to do with his life. "Today, I'm here to declare myself eligible for the upcoming NBA draft," Bradley said. "I just feel it's the appropriate time for me right now in my career.
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