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David Byrne

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1997 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The beat was a chittering loop, a steady repetition blessed with the slow-boiling intensity of ritual music. The adornments were few - a grumbling bass line, a pealing jazz organ. On top was the perplexed voice of David Byrne, who was using the most modern tools available to sketch a jittery "Psycho Killer" with a far different psychological profile from the one he sang about in the '70s. Watching Byrne work Saturday at the Electric Factory, it was easy to see why he's attracted to currently fashionable machine-based electronica: Its austere building blocks (repetitive loops, simple rhythms, minimalist arrangements)
NEWS
June 3, 1994 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
DAVID BYRNE David Byrne / Luaka Bop After forays into Third World-flavored music that left many old fans stranded at the dock, singer-composer David Byrne has reverted to a quirky, yet more accessible, urban mix that is at times reminiscent of his Talking Heads triumphs. Better still, this is clearly his most personal and heartfelt work. It's a performance-art statement focused on Byrne's mortal fears and creative insecurities in a world with no logic, questions with no firm answers.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1994 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Give David Byrne this much: His post-Talking Heads identity crisis hasn't stopped him from taking risks. The urbane master of rock minimalism tried macho salsa, and wrote far more elaborately than was necessary. He attempted straight funk, and it felt like a dim throwback. But as his Wednesday night performance at the Keswick Theatre made clear, those setbacks haven't dimmed Byrne's enthusiasm. Like a news junkie, Byrne is determined to use every piece of information he picks up - late-night call-in confessions, the romantic music of Brazil, the latest on genetic engineering, hiphop beats - and to extract some larger meaning by juxtaposition or outright accident.
NEWS
May 24, 2004 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
From Verdi to disco, Tropicalia to Talking Heads, David Byrne presented pan-culturalism Friday at the Merriam Theater to an audience raised on his genre-jumping and eccentric lyricism. Rather than performing as the Byrne of old (low-level anxiety, clucking vocals), he was a calmer, cooler Head with energetic, statesmanlike elan. Looking fit, with gray hair spiked high, Byrne (and his band) dressed like UPS deliverymen presenting a 21-tune-salute to exotic ethnicity: the Fela-funk of "I Zimbra," the dramatically mournful "Ausencia," the tropical lullaby of "Tiny Apocalypse," the smooth operatics of "Un Di Felice Eterea.
NEWS
August 27, 1992 | By Dave Urbanski, FOR THE INQUIRER
If a folk club exists in Rio de Janeiro, some lucky patron might find David Byrne there, strumming his acoustic guitar and dancing the samba. Such was the flavor of Byrne's performance at the Tower Theater Tuesday, in which he smartly combined stark Greenwich Village-style folk with lavish South American instrumentation. The ex-Talking Heads singer/guitarist, who has been exploring Latin rhythms lately, began the evening in coffeehouse fashion - alone with his acoustic guitar, under the glow of a hanging construction light.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2011 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, staff
We're ready to Foster The People, feel the Byrne (David's) and share the gospel truth with Patti Austin in this week's new releases. TALKING IN TONGUES: "Stop Making Sense" was one of the best concert films ever. Now, I'd argue that talking head David Byrne has topped himself with "Ride, Rise, Roar" (Eagle Vision Blu-ray/DVD, A) , a marriage of music and movement that should send every contemporary song-and-dance popster back to the drawing boards (especially you, yawn, Gaga)
NEWS
September 30, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
What's the big deal about going to see live music, anyway? Rather than plunk down a significant portion of this week's paycheck to watch dudes make scrunched-up faces while they play guitar, or rappers grab their crotches to keep their trousers from falling down, wouldn't it be more pleasurable to just digest pre-recorded sounds in the comfort of your own comfy chair? I'm being partly facetious, of course. Thrills are still to be had from revelations found only in live performance, when musicians and their instruments (and machines)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1988 | By John Milward, Special to The Inquirer
David Byrne of Talking Heads is a man in the middle. Some see the musician and filmmaker as an artist who follows a private muse to mixed results. Others consider him a savvy commercial artist able to incorporate bits of the avant- garde or the just plain unusual into popular entertainment. Sometimes, even Byrne doesn't quite know where he belongs. "I'm kind of stuck in the middle," concedes Byrne, who mixed it up with musicians from around the globe on Talking Heads' new Naked LP and who is at work on a film-and-stage collaboration (The Forest)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2001 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The second act in the career of David Byrne, former Talking Heads frontman, goes like this: Unlike rock stars forced to confront their pasts on a daily basis, the artist famously dubbed "Rock's Renaissance Man" by Time magazine throws himself into alien worlds - tearing off on grand (some have said misguided) experiments to colonize Latin pop, launching a boutique label responsible for some of the most provocative world music reaching U.S. ears, doing the odd art or photography installation.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1986 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
The startling lyrics and startled presence of Talking Heads lead singer David Byrne make him a musician whom fans of Bob Seger and Pete Seeger can love. In his visually dazzling yet enigmatic directorial debut, True Stories, Byrne attempts to further broaden his constituency. It's not enough to be the Renaissance man of rock (He writes! He sings! He directs!); Byrne wants to be the everyman-connoisseur of schlock, too. However diverting the results of his ambition, they're equally puzzling.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Much has changed for Annie Clark, the performer known as St. Vincent, since she played the intimate First Unitarian Church nearly six years ago. In 2008, the singer/guitarist, fresh from stints with the Polyphonic Spree and in Sufjan Stevens' band, was mining a stark, smartly funny yet fragile-sounding solo career in art-pop with a quietly swooping croon and spookily emotive lyrics that made her sound like Kate Bush's daughter. In the years following, St. Vincent recorded Love This Giant with the ex-Talking Head David Byrne while touring its nervously choreographed stage show, and made buggy albums that entered the Top 20 ( Strange Mercy )
NEWS
November 4, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
On the last warm day of October, Izzy Almeida and Derek Watson - the duo at the heart of the band called Hunters - head home to their apartment on 13th Street in Center City. They'll hang at a friend's house, eat at the local cantina ("where we eat way too much," Almeida says with a laugh), and talk about their coming self-titled debut album, full of smashing, fuzz-toned psych-pop. At this time last year, Almeida and Watson did these things in Manhattan's East Village or Brooklyn's Williamsburg section, where they shared an apartment.
NEWS
September 30, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
What's the big deal about going to see live music, anyway? Rather than plunk down a significant portion of this week's paycheck to watch dudes make scrunched-up faces while they play guitar, or rappers grab their crotches to keep their trousers from falling down, wouldn't it be more pleasurable to just digest pre-recorded sounds in the comfort of your own comfy chair? I'm being partly facetious, of course. Thrills are still to be had from revelations found only in live performance, when musicians and their instruments (and machines)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2011 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, staff
We're ready to Foster The People, feel the Byrne (David's) and share the gospel truth with Patti Austin in this week's new releases. TALKING IN TONGUES: "Stop Making Sense" was one of the best concert films ever. Now, I'd argue that talking head David Byrne has topped himself with "Ride, Rise, Roar" (Eagle Vision Blu-ray/DVD, A) , a marriage of music and movement that should send every contemporary song-and-dance popster back to the drawing boards (especially you, yawn, Gaga)
NEWS
November 10, 2008 | By Jonathan Valania FOR THE INQUIRER
David Byrne got his first of countless standing ovations Saturday night just five songs into his set at the Tower Theater, where he closed out the North American run of his ambitious tour in support of Everything That Happens Will Happen Today, his splendid second collaboration with Brian Eno. Not surprisingly, the ovation was occasioned by the first Talking Heads song of the night - "Houses In Motion" from Remain in Light - but it was more than...
NEWS
May 24, 2004 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
From Verdi to disco, Tropicalia to Talking Heads, David Byrne presented pan-culturalism Friday at the Merriam Theater to an audience raised on his genre-jumping and eccentric lyricism. Rather than performing as the Byrne of old (low-level anxiety, clucking vocals), he was a calmer, cooler Head with energetic, statesmanlike elan. Looking fit, with gray hair spiked high, Byrne (and his band) dressed like UPS deliverymen presenting a 21-tune-salute to exotic ethnicity: the Fela-funk of "I Zimbra," the dramatically mournful "Ausencia," the tropical lullaby of "Tiny Apocalypse," the smooth operatics of "Un Di Felice Eterea.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2004 | By BRYAN QUIGLEY For the Daily News
Banjoist Bela Fleck and double-bass player Edgar Meyer offer "An Evening of Duets" as they tour off their new "Music for Two" recording (8 tonight, Keswick Theatre, 291 Keswick Ave., Glenside, $35, 215-572-7650 or www.keswicktheatre. com). Former Talking Head David Byrne has "Grown Backwards," as his new album proclaims, and he'll display the results at the Merriam Theater (8 tonight, with Juana Molina opening, 250 S. Broad St., $35-$37.50, 215-732-5446). Southern California punk-rockers the Offspring with Melissa Auf der Maur (former Hole and Smashing Pumpkins bassist)
NEWS
May 14, 2001 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
David Byrne can't leave well enough alone. Of course, fidgety adventurousness served him well in the past. Byrne began to contrast cool, wide-eyed detachment and global, polyrhythmic heat as far back as the Talking Heads' Fear of Music in 1979. And as head honcho of his own Luaka Bop label, he has spent the last decade giving exposure to a range of estimable world-music artists. Byrne drew heavily from his fifth solo album, Look Into the Eyeball, in his sold-out show Saturday at the Theater of Living Arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2001 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The second act in the career of David Byrne, former Talking Heads frontman, goes like this: Unlike rock stars forced to confront their pasts on a daily basis, the artist famously dubbed "Rock's Renaissance Man" by Time magazine throws himself into alien worlds - tearing off on grand (some have said misguided) experiments to colonize Latin pop, launching a boutique label responsible for some of the most provocative world music reaching U.S. ears, doing the odd art or photography installation.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1997 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The beat was a chittering loop, a steady repetition blessed with the slow-boiling intensity of ritual music. The adornments were few - a grumbling bass line, a pealing jazz organ. On top was the perplexed voice of David Byrne, who was using the most modern tools available to sketch a jittery "Psycho Killer" with a far different psychological profile from the one he sang about in the '70s. Watching Byrne work Saturday at the Electric Factory, it was easy to see why he's attracted to currently fashionable machine-based electronica: Its austere building blocks (repetitive loops, simple rhythms, minimalist arrangements)
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