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David Chang

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NEWS
September 21, 2002 | By Melanie Burney INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a setback to the reelection campaign of Sen. Robert G. Torricelli, a federal appeals court yesterday ordered the unsealing of a memorandum submitted at the sentencing of David Chang, the businessman at the center of a now-concluded investigation of the New Jersey Democrat. A three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit rejected arguments by Torricelli and federal prosecutors that the document should be kept secret as part of a grand jury investigation.
NEWS
September 27, 2002 | By Chris Mondics and Peter Nicholas INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In a potentially devastating setback for U.S. Sen. Robert G. Torricelli, a federal appeals court yesterday ordered the release of a scathing prosecution memo that largely backs up a government witness who said he had given Torricelli cash and other gifts in exchange for help with overseas business deals. The nine-page memo, by federal prosecutors in New York, contradicts assertions by Torricelli (D., N.J.) that a five-year government investigation of his dealings with the witness, former North Jersey businessman David Chang, cleared him of any wrongdoing.
NEWS
July 23, 2002 | By Tom Turcol INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a case that continues to cloud his reelection chances, New Jersey Democratic Sen. Robert G. Torricelli appeared before the Senate's Select Committee on Ethics yesterday and denied allegations that he accepted cash and gifts in exchange for official favors. Torricelli responded to the accusations in a closed-door hearing in Washington that lasted several hours and was so shrouded in secrecy that the committee would not even acknowledge it was taking place. Torricelli, who answered questions under oath, said in a brief interview afterward that Senate rules prohibited him from discussing details of his testimony.
NEWS
February 27, 2001 | By Eugene Kiely INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A former employee of David Chang, the New Jersey businessman at the center of the federal investigation of Robert G. Torricelli's 1996 Senate campaign fund-raising, says Chang urged her and other workers to help him funnel donations to another campaign that year: Bob Dole's run for president. Chang, who has pleaded guilty to making illegal contributions to Torricelli's Democratic campaign, solicited contributions from his employees and their spouses for Dole, a Republican, and reimbursed at least one of them, the former employee says.
NEWS
September 21, 2000 | By Nancy Phillips and Tom Turcol, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Federal authorities are investigating allegations that someone tried to silence a New Jersey man after he was charged with making illegal contributions to the campaign of U.S. Sen. Robert Torricelli (D., N.J.), according to people familiar with the inquiry. Law enforcement officials have subpoenaed records from the Hudson County jail, where the donor, David Chang, was briefly held in December after being arrested on charges that he funneled $53,700 to Torricelli's 1996 Senate race.
NEWS
April 19, 2001 | By Eugene Kiely INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Appearing stunned and clearly angered by accusations that he accepted gifts and cash from a political supporter, Sen. Robert G. Torricelli vowed yesterday to fight the charges "with every ounce of strength in my body. " Torricelli, whose 1996 U.S. Senate campaign has been the subject of a two-year investigation by the federal Campaign Financing Task Force, also said for the first time that he was "the focus" of a criminal investigation. David Chang, a former fund-raiser, contributor and friend, has told investigators that he gave the senator gifts and cash, the New York Times reported yesterday.
NEWS
February 28, 2006 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
To critics of the way Congress handles ethical infractions, the Senate ethics committee investigation of Robert G. Torricelli in 2002 became emblematic of how Congress overlooks or underplays questionable conduct by its members. The Justice Department began investigating Torricelli's relationship with North Jersey businessman David Chang in 1997 as part of a larger probe of campaign-finance abuses in the 1996 election. Prosecutors obtained evidence that Torricelli, a New Jersey Democrat, had accepted a watch, a television, an Oriental rug and cash from Chang and that he had taken official actions to further Chang's business interests.
FOOD
June 27, 2013 | By Michael Klein, PHILLY.COM
His name is on the facade, but Peter Serpico is one of the lowest-key chefs you'll get to know. Pose for a photo? He knows he has to, since he's opening one of the year's most anticipated restaurants in Philadelphia. He winces, briefly puts on a smile, and returns to work. Serpico - the solo debut of the former culinary director of David Chang's Momofuku empire - opened Friday, at 604 South St. The timing worked well. A year ago, Serpico decided that he "needed a change" from New York City, where he rode the roller coaster of opening a half-dozen restaurants around the world for Chang, a mercurial genius with a cult following for his deconstructed Asian home cooking.
NEWS
February 27, 2001 | By Eugene Kiely INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A former employee of David Chang, the New Jersey businessman at the center of the federal investigation of Robert G. Torricelli's 1996 Senate campaign fund-raising, says Chang urged her and other workers to help him funnel donations to another campaign that year: Bob Dole's run for president. Chang, who has pleaded guilty to making illegal contributions to Torricelli's Democratic campaign, solicited contributions from his employees and their spouses for Dole, a Republican, and reimbursed at least one of them, the former employee says.
NEWS
January 4, 2002 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Nearly five years after it began looking into illegal fund-raising in New Jersey Sen. Robert G. Torricelli's 1996 election campaign, the Justice Department said yesterday that it was ending its probe without charges against him. The departing U.S. attorney in Manhattan, Mary Jo White, who supervised the probe, offered no explanation, but said she was referring information obtained by investigators to the Senate Select Committee on Ethics....
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FOOD
June 27, 2013 | By Michael Klein, PHILLY.COM
His name is on the facade, but Peter Serpico is one of the lowest-key chefs you'll get to know. Pose for a photo? He knows he has to, since he's opening one of the year's most anticipated restaurants in Philadelphia. He winces, briefly puts on a smile, and returns to work. Serpico - the solo debut of the former culinary director of David Chang's Momofuku empire - opened Friday, at 604 South St. The timing worked well. A year ago, Serpico decided that he "needed a change" from New York City, where he rode the roller coaster of opening a half-dozen restaurants around the world for Chang, a mercurial genius with a cult following for his deconstructed Asian home cooking.
NEWS
February 28, 2006 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
To critics of the way Congress handles ethical infractions, the Senate ethics committee investigation of Robert G. Torricelli in 2002 became emblematic of how Congress overlooks or underplays questionable conduct by its members. The Justice Department began investigating Torricelli's relationship with North Jersey businessman David Chang in 1997 as part of a larger probe of campaign-finance abuses in the 1996 election. Prosecutors obtained evidence that Torricelli, a New Jersey Democrat, had accepted a watch, a television, an Oriental rug and cash from Chang and that he had taken official actions to further Chang's business interests.
NEWS
October 14, 2002 | By Peter Nicholas INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
He may not have knocked Robert G. Torricelli out of the New Jersey Senate race, but in a postmortem of the senator's dizzying fall, Bradley D. Simon may go down as having given a solid push. Simon is the lawyer for Torricelli's main accuser, businessman David Chang. It was no simple assignment. His client was convicted of funneling more than $50,000 in illegal contributions into Torricelli's 1996 Senate campaign. Chang was branded by the senator as a mentally disturbed liar and felon.
NEWS
October 6, 2002 | By Chris Mondics and Peter Nicholas INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
When the Senate Ethics Committee ended its probe of shady dealings between Sen. Robert G. Torricelli and David Chang, it issued a three-page letter that mildly rebuked Torricelli for minor breaches of Senate rules. It never told the public much about the case. Just how little is only now coming to light as new documents emerge showing that prosecutors had credible evidence of cash payments and other gifts to Torricelli and that much of the information was already in the committee's possession or easily obtainable by the committee.
NEWS
October 3, 2002
Exasperated by Torricelli's exit I am disappointed in this recent and disastrous political blunder by the New Jersey Democratic Party. There was sufficient time to ask Sen. Robert G. Torricelli to step aside and allow a more ethical candidate to represent the party in the midterm elections, yet, unfortunately, 15 days after the last day to remove a name from the ballot, party officials were scrambling to find a replacement. It is unfair to put anyone in a statewide campaign with only five weeks remaining before the general election.
NEWS
October 2, 2002 | By Tom Turcol INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Until the very end, Democrats at the highest levels in Washington tried to rescue their beleaguered senator in New Jersey. They continued to pour millions of dollars into Sen. Robert G. Torricelli's reelection race. They even gave him a national platform on Saturday morning, choosing him to deliver the party's response to President Bush's weekly radio address on national security. By then, however, it was too late. While Torricelli was trying to help revive his campaign for a second term with the nationwide radio speech, his pollsters were hurriedly telephoning hundreds of New Jersey residents to determine whether he still had a campaign worth worrying about.
NEWS
October 1, 2002 | By Peter Nicholas and Chris Mondics INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
It was a defiant note, nearly a plea, by a powerful U.S. senator whose reelection campaign was fast unraveling. "This case, this matter, remains the same," Sen. Robert G. Torricelli (D., N.J.) told reporters in a hastily arranged conference call last week. But everything had changed. Torricelli was speaking within an hour of the release of a prosecution memo that, in essence, vouched for his chief accuser, businessman David Chang. The nine-page letter by federal prosecutors said Chang's account that he had delivered cash and expensive gifts to Torricelli in exchange for political favors was "credible in most material respects.
NEWS
October 1, 2002 | By Larry Eichel
Yesterday afternoon, I ran into a former congressional colleague of Robert Torricelli's and told him what was then only a rumor: that the New Jersey senator had decided to abandon his scandal-plagued quest for re-election. The colleague did a quick double take, then said there had to be some mistake. The Bob Torricelli he knew would never walk away from a fight, not when something as dear to him as his own neck was on the line. And yet, sniffling back tears, Torricelli pulled the plug on his candidacy in Trenton last evening, at times sounding as if he were delivering his own eulogy.
NEWS
September 29, 2002
Robert G. Torricelli says he knows a liar when he sees one. Wonder what he sees when he looks in the mirror. A media request spurred the public release Thursday of a federal prosecutors' memo filed in the strange case of the senator from New Jersey and the shady David Chang. The memo asked a judge to be lenient in sentencing Chang for making illegal contributions to Sen. Torricelli's campaign. The prosecutors said Chang had offered credible information about how he showered gifts and cash on the senator in return for help with his business dealings.
NEWS
September 28, 2002 | By Angela Couloumbis INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Though Democrats across New Jersey continued to throw their support yesterday behind U.S. Sen. Robert G. Torricelli, others in the party privately said his campaign will be hard-pressed to overcome the latest onslaught of negative publicity. On Thursday, a federal appeals court ordered the release of a prosecutor's memo that, for the most part, backed up statements made by North Jersey businessman David Chang, who said he had given Torricelli cash and gifts in exchange for help with overseas business deals.
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