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David Chase

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Long before The Sopranos , David Chase wanted to make a movie about a rock-and-roll band in the New Jersey suburbs. And even before that, the writer, director, and creator of one of the most celebrated series in television history - whose feature film debut, Not Fade Away , opens Dec. 28 - was in a rock-and-roll band from the Jersey suburbs. Like Douglas, the curly-haired Rod Serling fan played by John Magaro who steps out from behind his kit in Not Fade Away to become the lead singer of his group, the Twylight Zones, Chase was once a teenage rock drummer.
NEWS
April 23, 1999 | New York Daily News
"The Sopranos," HBO's hit mob drama, will get some new characters and a larger production budget for its second season, the pay-cable channel confirmed Wednesday. "Sopranos" creator/executive producer David Chase told HBO executives in a recent meeting that he is at work on a broad story arc for next season, which would include new characters being added. But Chase shared few other details with the executives, an HBO spokesman said. The critically acclaimed series, which follows the personal and professional lives of the members of a contemporary New Jersey mob family, was produced on location in New Jersey and New York on a budget of about $2 million per episode for 13 episodes.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2012
Film New this week: Not Fade Away (*** out of four stars) Suburban New Jersey in the 1960s is carefully recreated by "Sopranos" auteur David Chase. John Magaro is great as Douglas, a gawky teen who finds confidence in his rock band. James Gandolfini, also of "The Sopranos," is the often-exasperated dad. A sprawling, often well-done tale. It's a hit. Rated R. . - Steven Rea Music Gov't Mule Formed as an Allman Brothers offshoot in 1994, Gov't Mule, which plays Dec. 28 and 29 at the Tower Theater, has kept its vigor and roadworthiness, becoming a much-followed jam band, due in large part to front man Warren Haynes.
NEWS
June 20, 2007
LAST WEEK, we asked for your interpretation of the blackout ending of "The Sopranos. " I think most people were disappointed by David Chase's sudden ending, and so was I. But then I thought, what if the man in the diner was a hit man who got cold feet, changed his mind and went into the men's room? And what about the other two men who came in after the first man? Were they customers or a hit team? That's the genius of Chase's storytelling. He makes you think of the possibilities instead of giving you the expected.
NEWS
April 25, 2001 | By George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As if beleaguered mob boss Tony Soprano doesn't already have enough problems, now another North Jersey mobster is gunning for him. But this time it's for real. George Fresolone, a former Newark-based wiseguy, has accused David Chase, the creator of The Sopranos, and HBO, which shows the popular television series, of copyright infringement. He says part of an episode this year was lifted from his 1994 mob tell-all, Blood Oath. In a letter to HBO last month, an attorney for Fresolone alleged that a scene in an episode titled "Fortunate Son" had been "taken almost verbatim" from the book.
NEWS
December 28, 2012 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
"THE SOPRANOS" creator David Chase has made his first theatrical movie, "Not Fade Away" - it's about New Jersey and about rock and roll, and it's clear he loves one of those things. Chase grew up in North Jersey in the 1960s before taking off for California and another life, and he's turned "Not Fade Away" into a coming-of-age story that's obviously drawn from his own experiences as an artistically-minded kid growing up in straight-laced suburban town with a family that didn't really get him. This dynamic expresses itself in music - the movie's protagonist is a teen (John Magaro)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2006 | By Jonathan Storm INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
"I don't care how close you are," Tony Soprano tells his pain-in-the-neck son, A.J. "In the end, your friends are gonna let you down. Family - they're the ones you can depend on. " So this means: 1. Tony's friends are gonna let him down. 2. Tony's family is gonna let him down. 3. Nothing. If you answered 3, you don't know nothing about The Sopranos, because everything means something, even the 21-month break in the action since the last time Tony drove out of the Lincoln Tunnel, and the singing group A3 moaned about a blue moon and the chosen one and the blues walking into town.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2001 | REGINA MEDINA Staff writer Ellen Gray and Daily News wire services contributed to this report
THEY'RE GETTING restless over in the South Pacific island nation of Fiji, which has become Celebrity Central over the past week or so. Mr. Smile himself, Tom Cruise, is having a blast we can only dream about at the same exclusive Fijian resort where his former half, Nicole Kidman, had been on holiday. The flame-haired actress left the resort just days ago with longtime friend Russell Crowe, the Australian Associated Press reported yesterday. The two Aussies may or may not be in a relationship.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2006 | by ELLEN GRAY Daily News Television Critic 215-854-5950
The end is near. Or at least nearing. David Chase, who created the world of "The Sopranos" and all who dwell within it, says that the show, which returns to HBO for its sixth season Sunday after a 21-month hiatus, is not going to be around much longer. "There will be these 12 [episodes] and then another eight and that will be the end. " Definitely? "Yeah. " If Chase keeps to a schedule that has those final eight episodes - which HBO is including as part of the current season - premiering in January 2007, that means the series finale will likely come a year from now. Which in "Sopranos" terms is no time at all. So you already know the when.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2003 | By HOWARD GENSLER gensleh@phillynews.com Daily News wire services contributed to this report
LUTHER Vandross has been moved out of intensive care and upgraded to stable condition, his business manager said yesterday. Vandross "is more and more responsive each day," Carmen Romano said in a statement. "I feel as though I am watching a modern day miracle. " The R&B singer remains hospitalized at Cornell-Weill Medical Center. He had been in critical condition since his April 16 stroke, at one point contracting pneumonia and needing a tracheotomy to help him breathe. He no longer needs a respirator to breathe.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thousands of fans converged Thursday morning at the Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine on Manhattan's Upper West Side for James Gandolfini 's funeral, joining scores of the actor's family and friends. The cathedral, which had set aside 1,500 seats for mourners, was overwhelmed as fans vied for open spots after the invited guests were escorted to a reserved area. The Rev. James A Kowalski , dean of the cathedral, led the service, stepping aside to allow four of Gandolfini's loved ones to offer remembrances, including his wife, Deborah Lin Gandolfini , and family friends Thomas Richardson and Susan Aston . The Sopranos creator, David Chase , also spoke.
NEWS
June 21, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
TV VIEWERS may well continue to argue for decades about whether Tony Soprano is dead, but it won't feel the same, now that the man who brought him to life is gone. James Gandolfini, the burly - and surprisingly shy - actor who shot to stardom in HBO's "The Sopranos" as an up-and-coming mobster suffering a midlife crisis, died in Italy yesterday of a possible heart attack, and never wanted to see his character go that way. Killing the panic-attack-prone Tony off with a heart attack would be "kind of lame," he told reporters in 2006, back when speculation about how the show would end was all the rage.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Musical choices are personal for everybody, and for filmmakers more than most. And as 2012 came to a close, multiplexes filled with movies in which directors used music as much as plot and character to tell their stories and put across their artistic visions. David Chase's Not Fade Away and Judd Apatow's This Is 40 are generational tales whose auteurs spin semiautobiographical sagas in which music is an essential element in the narrative. In Not Fade Away, the tumult of the 1960s is evoked through the coming-of-age of a curly-haired teenager (John Magaro)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2012
Film New this week: Not Fade Away (*** out of four stars) Suburban New Jersey in the 1960s is carefully recreated by "Sopranos" auteur David Chase. John Magaro is great as Douglas, a gawky teen who finds confidence in his rock band. James Gandolfini, also of "The Sopranos," is the often-exasperated dad. A sprawling, often well-done tale. It's a hit. Rated R. . - Steven Rea Music Gov't Mule Formed as an Allman Brothers offshoot in 1994, Gov't Mule, which plays Dec. 28 and 29 at the Tower Theater, has kept its vigor and roadworthiness, becoming a much-followed jam band, due in large part to front man Warren Haynes.
NEWS
December 28, 2012 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
"THE SOPRANOS" creator David Chase has made his first theatrical movie, "Not Fade Away" - it's about New Jersey and about rock and roll, and it's clear he loves one of those things. Chase grew up in North Jersey in the 1960s before taking off for California and another life, and he's turned "Not Fade Away" into a coming-of-age story that's obviously drawn from his own experiences as an artistically-minded kid growing up in straight-laced suburban town with a family that didn't really get him. This dynamic expresses itself in music - the movie's protagonist is a teen (John Magaro)
NEWS
December 28, 2012
BUCKET LIST ITEM achieved: Shake the hand of the man who wrote the best TV episode ever. The man turns out to be David Chase, so you think this is another genuflection from some "Sopranos" groupie. Not so. Chase, in his younger days, also wrote for "The Rockford Files," another great show, though less exalted. Turns out Chase, as I sort of suspected, authored my favorite episode. PI Jim Rockford gets stuck with a hippie client on the run from a fraudulent New Age cult. She frustrates the detective by answering questions with far-out non-sequiturs: "What is the sound of one hand clapping?"
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Long before The Sopranos , David Chase wanted to make a movie about a rock-and-roll band in the New Jersey suburbs. And even before that, the writer, director, and creator of one of the most celebrated series in television history - whose feature film debut, Not Fade Away , opens Dec. 28 - was in a rock-and-roll band from the Jersey suburbs. Like Douglas, the curly-haired Rod Serling fan played by John Magaro who steps out from behind his kit in Not Fade Away to become the lead singer of his group, the Twylight Zones, Chase was once a teenage rock drummer.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2009 | Michael Smerconish
MONK FINALE. 9 tonight, USA. I FIGURED Andy Breckman, a Haddonfield Memorial High School graduate, would have big plans tonight given that the television series he created, and for which he wrote the final episode, will get its curtain call. But it sounds like there will be more excitement at my household of "Monk" fanatics than his. "This will disappoint you," the series' creator and executive producer warned when we spoke yesterday morning. "My wife Beth wanted to invite friends over.
NEWS
June 20, 2007
LAST WEEK, we asked for your interpretation of the blackout ending of "The Sopranos. " I think most people were disappointed by David Chase's sudden ending, and so was I. But then I thought, what if the man in the diner was a hit man who got cold feet, changed his mind and went into the men's room? And what about the other two men who came in after the first man? Were they customers or a hit team? That's the genius of Chase's storytelling. He makes you think of the possibilities instead of giving you the expected.
NEWS
June 10, 2007 | By Terry Bitman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There is only one question that matters tonight: Does Tony Soprano get whacked? After more than eight years and 86 episodes, HBO's The Sopranos ends this evening with an enticing, multi-entendre-titled installment, "Made in America. " The object of weeks of speculation, it follows the penultimate episode, which closed with Tony lying in bed, cuddling an automatic rifle like a security blanket. Is creator David Chase - who likes to offer homage to mob stories past - about to bow to Scarface and have Tony go out in a blaze of glory with his "little friend"?
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