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David Clohessy

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NEWS
November 16, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
KANSAS CITY, MO. - A Kansas City Roman Catholic bishop dodged more misdemeanor charges yesterday for his handling of a priest accused of taking hundreds of pornographic pictures of children. Bishop Robert Finn entered into an agreement with the Clay County prosecutor's office that will give the prosecutor authority, for five years, to review how the Kansas City-St. Joseph Catholic Diocese handles future allegations of child abuse in that county. The agreement requires the bishop to report directly to the prosecutor monthly to apprise him of any reported abuse activities involving minors throughout the diocese's Clay County facilities.
NEWS
November 15, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
The Roman Catholic Church should put the needs of sexual-abuse victims first and establish advisory groups to help bishops decide whether offending priests can return to ministry after treatment, a bishops' committee recommended yesterday. The panel also urged Catholic leaders to widen diocesan sexual-abuse policies beyond clergy pedophilia to cover a broad range of sexual misconduct by all church employees. "Victims first," said Bishop John F. Kinney of Bismarck, N.D., chairman of the Ad Hoc Committee on Sexual Abuse of the National Conference of Catholic Bishops.
NEWS
July 19, 2011 | By JAN RANSOM, ransomj@phillynews.com 215-854-5218
Update: The Vatican officially announced this morning that Denver Archbishop Charles J. Chaput has been named the new archbishop of Philadelphia. -- Denver Archbishop Charles Chaput, who will take over the beleaguered Philadelphia Archdiocese, will face a roster of daunting challenges. Dozens of suspended priests are being investigated for sex crimes, a high-ranking church official has been charged with child-endangerment and four others, including a schoolteacher, have been charged with sexually assaulting minors after a damning grand-jury report blasted the Archdiocese for a widespread coverup of predatory priests.
NEWS
February 25, 2011 | By DANA DiFILIPPO, difilid@phillynews.com 215-854-5934
In its continuing crusade to make amends with Catholics miffed about church officials' alleged coverup of pedophile priests, the Archdiocese yesterday printed an apology to parishioners in its newspaper. "We are sorry," reads the editorial apology in the Catholic Standard & Times . "We, the Church, are sorry for the sexual abuse suffered by our brothers and sisters when they were young people at the hands of the Church's clergymen and teachers. The Church is sorry for the sins and crimes of some members against other members.
NEWS
October 25, 2013 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sean Patrick McIlmail kept his secret for 12 years as it chewed away at him and as his close-knit family watched him descend into mental illness and drug abuse. On Wednesday - four days after they buried the 26-year-old - his parents, brother, and sister decided the time for secrets was over. In an interview at their lawyer's Bucks County home, McIlmail's parents, older brother, and younger sister confirmed it was Sean who accused former Philadelphia Catholic priest Robert L. Brennan of sexually molesting him over four years beginning when he was an 11-year-old altar boy. Sean's death was still painfully fresh for the McIlmails.
NEWS
November 15, 1994 | By David Briggs, ASSOCIATED PRESS Inquirer staff writer Maureen Graham contributed to this article
The Roman Catholic Church should put the needs of sexual-abuse victims first and establish advisory groups to help bishops decide whether offending priests may return to their ministry after treatment, a bishops' committee recommended yesterday. The panel also urged Catholic leaders to widen diocesan sexual-abuse policies beyond clergy pedophilia to cover a broad range of sexual misconduct by all church employees. "Victims first," said Bishop John F. Kinney of Bismarck, N.D., chairman of the Ad Hoc Committee on Sexual Abuse of the National Conference of Catholic Bishops.
NEWS
October 21, 2005 | By Jim Remsen INQUIRER FAITH LIFE EDITOR
Standing outside church headquarters yesterday, a group of victims of abuse by Catholic priests called on Cardinal Justin Rigali to lobby for legal changes and punish church officials who had any role in covering up clergy misconduct. "All your hollow-sounding pledges to 'do better,' 'put children first,' 'learn from mistakes' will continue to ring hollow until you show by your deed that you mean business," stated a four-page letter written by Survivors Network of Those Abused by Priests and Other Clergy, the national advocacy group known as SNAP.
NEWS
November 2, 2002 | By David O'Reilly and Jim Remsen INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Anger, confusion and reassurances greeted news reports yesterday that the Vatican had diluted the American bishops' tough new policy on sexual abuse of children by priests. According to those reports, Cardinal Francis George of Chicago told an impromptu news conference Thursday that the Vatican had ordered the bishops to modify their "zero-tolerance" policy. That policy, adopted in June, called for the prompt dismissal of any priest or deacon credibly accused of abuse, no matter when the abuse took place.
NEWS
November 27, 2011 | By Frances D'Emilio, Associated Press
VATICAN CITY - Pope Benedict XVI insisted Saturday that all institutions and not just the Catholic Church must be held to exacting standards in their response to sex abuse of children, and he defended the church's efforts to confront the problem. Benedict acknowledged in remarks to visiting U.S. bishops at the Vatican that pedophilia was a scourge for society, and that decades of scandals over clergy abusing children had left American Catholics bewildered. "It is my hope that the church's conscientious efforts to confront this reality will help the broader community to recognize the causes, true extent, and devastating consequences of sexual abuse, and to respond effectively to this scourge, which affects every level of society," he said.
NEWS
March 10, 2011 | By REGINA MEDINA, medinar@phillynews.com 215-854-5985
Yes, it was the day after the Archdiocese of Philadelphia placed 21 unidentified priests on administrative leave to investigate claims of sexual abuse and inappropriate behavior. Affirmative, too, that bloggers and Church critics lashed out at the Archdiocese for withholding the priests' names, adding to its latest tempest. Also ratcheting up the tension outside the Cathedral Basilica of Ss. Peter and Paul were a few clergy-abuse survivors, again alerting passers-by to the rapes of children whose pictures they held up. P.S.: The media, both local and national, were there, too. But the scene was nothing that Philly's Catholics couldn't handle.
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NEWS
October 25, 2013 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sean Patrick McIlmail kept his secret for 12 years as it chewed away at him and as his close-knit family watched him descend into mental illness and drug abuse. On Wednesday - four days after they buried the 26-year-old - his parents, brother, and sister decided the time for secrets was over. In an interview at their lawyer's Bucks County home, McIlmail's parents, older brother, and younger sister confirmed it was Sean who accused former Philadelphia Catholic priest Robert L. Brennan of sexually molesting him over four years beginning when he was an 11-year-old altar boy. Sean's death was still painfully fresh for the McIlmails.
NEWS
May 22, 2012 | By Miriam Hill, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Archdiocese of Philadelphia on Sunday announced that it had found two more priests unsuitable for ministry over claims that each had sexually abused a minor. The archdiocese said it had substantiated a claim against Msgr. George J. Mazzotta, who most recently served at Stella Maris Parish in Philadelphia and St. Madeline Parish in Ridley Park. Msgr. Hugh P. Campbell, who is retired but most recently served at St. Maximilian Kolbe Parish in West Chester, told the archdiocese himself in December that he had sexually abused a minor, according to a brief news release from the archdiocese.
NEWS
December 21, 2011 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Since the child sex-abuse scandal broke at Penn State in November, victims of sexual abuse - many of whom had remained silent about their suffering for years - have been speaking up across the country, seeking counseling, calling hotlines, and contacting attorneys. An unprecedented increase in reports of abuse seems to have been inspired by the fall from grace of the university's revered football coach, Joe Paterno, and the school's president, Graham B. Spanier. "If the powerful come down, the powerless really do feel they have a shot," said Marci A. Hamilton, a lawyer from Bucks County and author of Justice Denied: What America Must Do to Protect Its Children . The Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network reported that in November, after the Penn State allegations came to light, its online hotline providing confidential support for victims ( www.online.rainn.org )
NEWS
November 27, 2011 | By Frances D'Emilio, Associated Press
VATICAN CITY - Pope Benedict XVI insisted Saturday that all institutions and not just the Catholic Church must be held to exacting standards in their response to sex abuse of children, and he defended the church's efforts to confront the problem. Benedict acknowledged in remarks to visiting U.S. bishops at the Vatican that pedophilia was a scourge for society, and that decades of scandals over clergy abusing children had left American Catholics bewildered. "It is my hope that the church's conscientious efforts to confront this reality will help the broader community to recognize the causes, true extent, and devastating consequences of sexual abuse, and to respond effectively to this scourge, which affects every level of society," he said.
NEWS
November 16, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
KANSAS CITY, MO. - A Kansas City Roman Catholic bishop dodged more misdemeanor charges yesterday for his handling of a priest accused of taking hundreds of pornographic pictures of children. Bishop Robert Finn entered into an agreement with the Clay County prosecutor's office that will give the prosecutor authority, for five years, to review how the Kansas City-St. Joseph Catholic Diocese handles future allegations of child abuse in that county. The agreement requires the bishop to report directly to the prosecutor monthly to apprise him of any reported abuse activities involving minors throughout the diocese's Clay County facilities.
NEWS
July 31, 2011
George Weigel is distinguished senior fellow of Washington's Ethics and Public Policy Center When Pope Benedict XVI appointed Charles J. Chaput as the new archbishop of Philadelphia on July 19, the usual suspects were trotted out to say the usual things that the usual suspects say. Thus, David Clohessy of SNAP, the Survivors Network of Those Abused by Priests, continued his nine-year rant against the Catholic Church by pronouncing Chaput's...
NEWS
July 19, 2011 | By JAN RANSOM, ransomj@phillynews.com 215-854-5218
Update: The Vatican officially announced this morning that Denver Archbishop Charles J. Chaput has been named the new archbishop of Philadelphia. -- Denver Archbishop Charles Chaput, who will take over the beleaguered Philadelphia Archdiocese, will face a roster of daunting challenges. Dozens of suspended priests are being investigated for sex crimes, a high-ranking church official has been charged with child-endangerment and four others, including a schoolteacher, have been charged with sexually assaulting minors after a damning grand-jury report blasted the Archdiocese for a widespread coverup of predatory priests.
NEWS
March 10, 2011 | By REGINA MEDINA, medinar@phillynews.com 215-854-5985
Yes, it was the day after the Archdiocese of Philadelphia placed 21 unidentified priests on administrative leave to investigate claims of sexual abuse and inappropriate behavior. Affirmative, too, that bloggers and Church critics lashed out at the Archdiocese for withholding the priests' names, adding to its latest tempest. Also ratcheting up the tension outside the Cathedral Basilica of Ss. Peter and Paul were a few clergy-abuse survivors, again alerting passers-by to the rapes of children whose pictures they held up. P.S.: The media, both local and national, were there, too. But the scene was nothing that Philly's Catholics couldn't handle.
NEWS
March 10, 2011 | By David O'Reilly, Nancy Phillips, and Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writers
The solemn liturgical season of Lent began in sobering fashion Wednesday for area Catholics as they began to learn the names of 21 priests suspended this week amid allegations of sexual abuse or other improper behavior with minors. The priests, placed on administrative leave pending an investigation, included four monsignors, and men with as many as 62 years in ministry or as few as seven. In a move of nationally unprecedented scope and swiftness, the archdiocese announced Tuesday that it had suspended the priests in response to last month's Philadelphia grand jury report, which questioned why they were still in ministry despite the accusations.
NEWS
March 9, 2011 | By David O'Reilly and Nancy Phillips, Inquirer Staff Writers
In an action of unprecedented scope in the Roman Catholic Church nationwide, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced Tuesday that it was putting 21 priests on administrative leave because of allegations that they sexually abused or behaved improperly with minors. The archdiocese said it was responding to the Feb. 10 report by a Philadelphia grand jury that found that 37 local priests were serving in ministry despite accusations of questionable behavior. "I know that for many people, their trust in the church has been shaken," Cardinal Justin Rigali said in a statement Tuesday.
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