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David Milch

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2012
LUCK. 9 p.m. Sunday, HBO.   PASADENA, Calif. - "Does anyone mind if I take my shoes off?" rasped Nick Nolte. No one did. And it was off to the races with the four horses in the lead of HBO's track-based drama "Luck": executive producers David Milch ("Deadwood," "NYPD Blue") and Michael Mann ("Heat") and stars Dustin Hoffman and Nolte. And five journalists who were just hoping not to get thrown. Yeah, five on four. It's not how I usually do this job, but maybe HBO was playing by movie-star rules.
NEWS
January 21, 1998 | by Scott Williams, New York Daily News
While "NYPD Blue" was celebrating its 100th episode last Tuesday, actor Bill Brochtrup was celebrating his return to the Steven Bochco drama as the sensitive-and-sweet police aide, John. "I feel like I'm coming home. Today was my first day back, and everybody, cast and crew, was making me welcome," Brochtrup said. Brochtrup, who is openly gay, got great reviews for his portrayal of a gay man working in the rough-and-tumble arena of a New York detective squad. He also established himself as a member of Bochco's repertory company before leaving "NYPD Blue" two seasons ago. He went on to two more Bochco productions, the short-lived NYPD Vice comedy "Public Morals," and "Total Security," killed by ABC after a short run last fall.
NEWS
February 27, 1995 | BY JON CAROULIS
A 13-year old boy is charged with shooting a 10-year-old girl; police wonder how he got the gun. A gang preys on elderly citizens at automatic teller machines. Patrons in a bar are held at gunpoint, raped, beaten and shot. A police manhunt finds the criminals: three boys under 15. The above incidents are fictions, brought to us by Steven Bochco, one of TV's best producers. But those snippets aren't from his newest show, "NYPD Blue. " They're from the 1981 season of his "Hill Street Blues," now on Channel 48. Hailed as a TV breakthrough, "Hill Street" portrayed cops in a precinct dubbed "The Hill," fighting a losing war against urban blight, crime, drugs, abused women and children, racism, violence.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1999 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
You unlock this door with the key of your remote control. Behind it is a dimension of television that lies far above the pit of the mundane, at the summit of the craft. It is a fifth dimension, beyond that which is known to most TV writers and producers. It is a dimension as seductive as a warm bath and as stimulating as a brisk shower, a dimension of sound and a dimension of sight, but most of all a dimension of mind. This is the dimension of imagination. You're moving into a land of both shadow and substance, of emotion and ideas.
NEWS
April 15, 1987 | By SUSAN STEWART, Special to the Daily News
The Blues: No "Hill Street Blues" again Tuesday night. Get used to it. Monday, NBC canceled the seven-year-old show, surprising nobody, but making the world a slightly sadder place. The cancellation was announced by Arthur Price, president of MTM Enterprises, which produces the show. "We have enjoyed seven very satisfying seasons making 'Hill Street Blues,' " Price said. "It seems appropriate to close this happy venture on a high note and to permit the show's vastly talented staff of writers and actors to pursue other projects.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1987 | By SUSAN STEWART, Special to the Daily News
The Blues: No "Hill Street Blues" again Tuesday night. Get used to it. Monday, NBC canceled the 7-year-old show, surprising nobody but making the world a slightly sadder place. The cancellation was announced by Arthur Price, president of MTM Enterprises, which produces the show. "We have enjoyed seven very satisfying seasons making 'Hill Street Blues,' " Price said. "It seems appropriate to close this happy venture on a high note and to permit the show's vastly talented staff of writers and actors to pursue other projects.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2012 | BY ELLEN GRAY, Daily News Television Critic 215-854-5950
THE HORSES aren't the only things going round and round in HBO's racetrack drama "Luck," which officially hits the starting gate at 9 p.m. Sunday with the pilot the channel first previewed last month. Written by David Milch ("Deadwood," "NYPD Blue") and directed by Michael Mann ("Heat"), it's an episode that sets a lot of separate planets spinning, leaving viewers to guess how long it'll take for their orbits to cross. Don't be surprised if it's awhile and if the finish line looks farther away the farther you go. Half the fun of watching a Milch show is the journey from confusion to recognition, as your ear becomes attuned to the dialogue and to an ever-expanding universe of characters.
NEWS
June 6, 2007 | By Gail Shister INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you expect David Milch to concisely explain the premise of his inscrutable new HBO drama, we have three words for you: Not gonna happen. Maestro Milch, who could discourse metaphysically about cardboard, takes offense at the notion that John From Cincinnati can be summarized in one neat, TV-grid-friendly sentence. HBO can't do it, either, apparently. John's marketing campaign is as enigmatic as the "surf noir" series itself, which hits the beach at 10 p.m. Sunday. "This show cannot be sold in a sound-bite," sniffs Milch, 62, creator of HBO's Deadwood and cocreator of NYPD Blue.
NEWS
June 6, 2007 | By Gail Shister, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you expect David Milch to concisely explain the premise of his inscrutable new HBO drama, we have three words for you: Not gonna happen. Maestro Milch, who could discourse metaphysically about cardboard, takes offense at the notion that John From Cincinnati can be summarized in one neat, TV-grid-friendly sentence. HBO can't do it, either, apparently. John's marketing campaign is as enigmatic as the "surf noir" series itself, which hits the beach at 10 p.m. Sunday.
NEWS
January 9, 2001 | by Ellen Gray, Daily News Television Critic
Hope springs eternal in television, where spring arrives about two weeks after the last holiday special. Each January brings a slew of replacements for fall shows that were dead on arrival, shows like "The Trouble with Normal" and "Normal, Ohio" that only the most demented network exec could ever have believed would stand a chance. But why would anyone even think of warming up to a series launched in "midseason," the spot traditionally reserved for shows that weren't considered quite ready for prime time a few months earlier?
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2012
LUCK. 9 p.m. Sunday, HBO.   PASADENA, Calif. - "Does anyone mind if I take my shoes off?" rasped Nick Nolte. No one did. And it was off to the races with the four horses in the lead of HBO's track-based drama "Luck": executive producers David Milch ("Deadwood," "NYPD Blue") and Michael Mann ("Heat") and stars Dustin Hoffman and Nolte. And five journalists who were just hoping not to get thrown. Yeah, five on four. It's not how I usually do this job, but maybe HBO was playing by movie-star rules.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2012 | BY ELLEN GRAY, Daily News Television Critic 215-854-5950
THE HORSES aren't the only things going round and round in HBO's racetrack drama "Luck," which officially hits the starting gate at 9 p.m. Sunday with the pilot the channel first previewed last month. Written by David Milch ("Deadwood," "NYPD Blue") and directed by Michael Mann ("Heat"), it's an episode that sets a lot of separate planets spinning, leaving viewers to guess how long it'll take for their orbits to cross. Don't be surprised if it's awhile and if the finish line looks farther away the farther you go. Half the fun of watching a Milch show is the journey from confusion to recognition, as your ear becomes attuned to the dialogue and to an ever-expanding universe of characters.
NEWS
June 6, 2007 | By Gail Shister INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you expect David Milch to concisely explain the premise of his inscrutable new HBO drama, we have three words for you: Not gonna happen. Maestro Milch, who could discourse metaphysically about cardboard, takes offense at the notion that John From Cincinnati can be summarized in one neat, TV-grid-friendly sentence. HBO can't do it, either, apparently. John's marketing campaign is as enigmatic as the "surf noir" series itself, which hits the beach at 10 p.m. Sunday. "This show cannot be sold in a sound-bite," sniffs Milch, 62, creator of HBO's Deadwood and cocreator of NYPD Blue.
NEWS
June 6, 2007 | By Gail Shister, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you expect David Milch to concisely explain the premise of his inscrutable new HBO drama, we have three words for you: Not gonna happen. Maestro Milch, who could discourse metaphysically about cardboard, takes offense at the notion that John From Cincinnati can be summarized in one neat, TV-grid-friendly sentence. HBO can't do it, either, apparently. John's marketing campaign is as enigmatic as the "surf noir" series itself, which hits the beach at 10 p.m. Sunday.
NEWS
January 9, 2001 | by Ellen Gray, Daily News Television Critic
Hope springs eternal in television, where spring arrives about two weeks after the last holiday special. Each January brings a slew of replacements for fall shows that were dead on arrival, shows like "The Trouble with Normal" and "Normal, Ohio" that only the most demented network exec could ever have believed would stand a chance. But why would anyone even think of warming up to a series launched in "midseason," the spot traditionally reserved for shows that weren't considered quite ready for prime time a few months earlier?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1999 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
You unlock this door with the key of your remote control. Behind it is a dimension of television that lies far above the pit of the mundane, at the summit of the craft. It is a fifth dimension, beyond that which is known to most TV writers and producers. It is a dimension as seductive as a warm bath and as stimulating as a brisk shower, a dimension of sound and a dimension of sight, but most of all a dimension of mind. This is the dimension of imagination. You're moving into a land of both shadow and substance, of emotion and ideas.
NEWS
January 21, 1998 | by Scott Williams, New York Daily News
While "NYPD Blue" was celebrating its 100th episode last Tuesday, actor Bill Brochtrup was celebrating his return to the Steven Bochco drama as the sensitive-and-sweet police aide, John. "I feel like I'm coming home. Today was my first day back, and everybody, cast and crew, was making me welcome," Brochtrup said. Brochtrup, who is openly gay, got great reviews for his portrayal of a gay man working in the rough-and-tumble arena of a New York detective squad. He also established himself as a member of Bochco's repertory company before leaving "NYPD Blue" two seasons ago. He went on to two more Bochco productions, the short-lived NYPD Vice comedy "Public Morals," and "Total Security," killed by ABC after a short run last fall.
NEWS
February 27, 1995 | BY JON CAROULIS
A 13-year old boy is charged with shooting a 10-year-old girl; police wonder how he got the gun. A gang preys on elderly citizens at automatic teller machines. Patrons in a bar are held at gunpoint, raped, beaten and shot. A police manhunt finds the criminals: three boys under 15. The above incidents are fictions, brought to us by Steven Bochco, one of TV's best producers. But those snippets aren't from his newest show, "NYPD Blue. " They're from the 1981 season of his "Hill Street Blues," now on Channel 48. Hailed as a TV breakthrough, "Hill Street" portrayed cops in a precinct dubbed "The Hill," fighting a losing war against urban blight, crime, drugs, abused women and children, racism, violence.
NEWS
April 15, 1987 | By SUSAN STEWART, Special to the Daily News
The Blues: No "Hill Street Blues" again Tuesday night. Get used to it. Monday, NBC canceled the seven-year-old show, surprising nobody, but making the world a slightly sadder place. The cancellation was announced by Arthur Price, president of MTM Enterprises, which produces the show. "We have enjoyed seven very satisfying seasons making 'Hill Street Blues,' " Price said. "It seems appropriate to close this happy venture on a high note and to permit the show's vastly talented staff of writers and actors to pursue other projects.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1987 | By SUSAN STEWART, Special to the Daily News
The Blues: No "Hill Street Blues" again Tuesday night. Get used to it. Monday, NBC canceled the 7-year-old show, surprising nobody but making the world a slightly sadder place. The cancellation was announced by Arthur Price, president of MTM Enterprises, which produces the show. "We have enjoyed seven very satisfying seasons making 'Hill Street Blues,' " Price said. "It seems appropriate to close this happy venture on a high note and to permit the show's vastly talented staff of writers and actors to pursue other projects.
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