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David Rudovsky

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NEWS
May 7, 2008 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The family of Timothy Goode, the grand-nephew of former Mayor W. Wilson Goode who was killed by police in January, has retained prominent civil-rights lawyer David Rudovsky and filed a formal complaint with the city's Police Advisory Commission. Rudovsky, a longtime criminal-defense lawyer and senior fellow at the University of Pennsylvania, confirmed that he was representing the family but said neither he nor the family would comment further. Timothy Goode, 24, of the Northwood section of Northeast Philadelphia, died Jan. 11 after police pursued and shot him in Germantown.
NEWS
October 21, 1994 | By Julia Cass, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The lawyer representing inmates in the long-running class-action suit against Philadelphia's prisons yesterday asked a Common Pleas Court panel to fine the city for not keeping the prisons in good repair, not placing enough inmates in vocational training, and not establishing an adequate inmate grievance system. The motion, filed by attorney David Rudovsky, also alleges that the practice of keeping half of Holmesburg inmates locked down in their cellblocks on alternate days means they are not getting the law library visits, two hours of exercise, and phone calls to attorneys that they are supposed to have under a detailed 1991 agreement reached between the city and the inmates.
NEWS
January 14, 1988 | By DAVE RACHER, Daily News Staff Writer
The city last month agreed to pay $495,000 over the next 15 years to settle a civil lawsuit filed by Sidney Davis, who was imprisoned for 19 months after a police officer allegedly prompted false identifications of him by witnesses. Yesterday, a judge ordered evidence-tampering charges against that officer, Stephen Brader, 33, dropped. The ruling was the second by a city judge that the prosecution has no case against Brader, a former police sergeant accused of framing Davis in connection with a 1985 South Philadelphia racial shooting.
NEWS
November 20, 1995 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
For 24 years city attorneys and a lawyer for inmates have conducted a costly battle over prison living conditions before a panel of Common Pleas judges. How costly? Excluding the cost of attorneys, the city has been fined $2.8 million since 1990. That's a lot of money for not meeting the terms of an agreement the city signed with inmates. The case, known as Jackson v. Hendrick, is separate from the federal case over prison overcrowding. With the federal court prepared to pull back from its oversight in that case, what are the prospects that Jackson v. Hendrick might end?
NEWS
September 10, 2003 | By L. Stuart Ditzen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A former employee has sued State Sen. Vincent J. Fumo (D., Phila.), saying Fumo fired him last year for wearing a pro-Rendell lapel sticker at a time when Fumo was supporting another candidate for governor. In a suit filed Monday in U.S. District Court, Robert Mulgrew, 46, of South Philadelphia, contends Fumo demanded that he remove a Rendell for Governor sticker at a political event on May 13, 2002. According to the suit, Mulgrew, who was a constituent-service worker in Fumo's South Philadelphia office, refused to remove the sticker and Fumo immediately fired him in the presence of "a large number of people.
NEWS
December 1, 2009
THE TERM "police shooting" is one of the most disheartening in the lexicon of the city . . . whether you're talking about a police officer being shot or an officer doing the shooting. It's clear there is too much of both kind, and that, too, is disheartening, suggesting a war that has no business being fought in this city. The latest use of the term refers to the shooting death of unarmed 21-year-old Billy Panas in Port Richmond by off-duty police officer Frank Tepper 10 days ago. As is the case in such stories, there are many questions and too many answers we'll either never hear or we'll wait too long to find out. And until the city, the Police Department and the District Attorney's Office find a better process for promptly investigating these cases and reporting to the public, we'll continue to see a correlation between the lack of answers and Philadelphia's ranking as having one of the highest number of police shootings in the country.
NEWS
February 3, 1989 | By L. Stuart Ditzen, Inquirer Staff Writer
An attorney for Wilfredo Santiago, convicted of killing city police Officer Thomas J. Trench, argued to state Superior Court yesterday that Santiago's 1986 trial was an "unfair proceeding" and failed to solve the case. "This is a verdict that the court can have no confidence in," declared attorney David Rudovsky in arguing for a new trial. "It was an unfair proceeding. We still don't know who killed Officer Trench. " Assistant District Attorney Laurie Magid countered: "There was abundant evidence in this case.
NEWS
September 17, 1999 | by Christine Bahls, Daily News Staff Writer
The cop unzipped the suspect's pants and aimed his flashlight down the man's underwear. Then he spun the handcuffed man around, stretched out the waistband of the suspect's shorts and searched his rear. Still no dope. For 20 minutes, the cop and his partner searched the suspect's red BMW, his jacket pockets, his baseball cap, his socks. They looked three times in the trunk, seven times in the man's pockets, twice in his socks and then pried into his underwear. Finally, they took the handcuffs off him and left.
NEWS
September 26, 2003 | By Jacqueline Soteropoulos INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The city has agreed to pay $1.9 million to four young men wrongly accused in the Lex Street massacre - among the costliest civil-rights lawsuit settlements in recent city history. Jermel Lewis, Quiante Perrin, Hezekiah Thomas and Sacon Youk - innocent men jailed 18 months awaiting a death-penalty trial - will each receive about $475,000, said Lewis' attorney, David Rudovsky. The amount includes lawyers' fees, which were not disclosed. Rudovsky said the agreement did not include any explicit apology to the men. "The money speaks as strongly as words would: 'You are innocent, and you were wrongly accused,' " Rudovsky said.
NEWS
December 15, 1995 | By Andrew Metz and Kyle York Spencer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENTS
Alleging that she was physically abused and ensnared in an illegal traffic- ticket quota system, a Norristown woman has filed a federal civil rights suit against the Borough of Bridgeport and a former police officer. Janet E. Walker claims that in October 1994, while driving through Bridgeport, she was wrongfully stopped for speeding, pulled from her car and handcuffed and harassed by then-patrolman Paul Maxey. Walker was given a speeding ticket and charged with disorderly conduct.
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NEWS
December 1, 2009
THE TERM "police shooting" is one of the most disheartening in the lexicon of the city . . . whether you're talking about a police officer being shot or an officer doing the shooting. It's clear there is too much of both kind, and that, too, is disheartening, suggesting a war that has no business being fought in this city. The latest use of the term refers to the shooting death of unarmed 21-year-old Billy Panas in Port Richmond by off-duty police officer Frank Tepper 10 days ago. As is the case in such stories, there are many questions and too many answers we'll either never hear or we'll wait too long to find out. And until the city, the Police Department and the District Attorney's Office find a better process for promptly investigating these cases and reporting to the public, we'll continue to see a correlation between the lack of answers and Philadelphia's ranking as having one of the highest number of police shootings in the country.
NEWS
June 9, 2008
"If the United States leads the world in incarceration," says civil-rights lawyer David Rudovsky, "Philadelphia leads the United States. " We have a higher percentage of our citizens in prison than anybody else, 3.5 times more than New York City. We're No. 1! We've won the inmate championship. And our prize is the chance to spend $230 million on prisons every year. This is one business we should be doing everything to unload. Prisoners are a growth industry.
NEWS
May 16, 2008 | By DANA DiFILIPPO, difilid@phillynews.com 215-854-5934
Two weeks after civil-rights attorneys filed a class-action lawsuit over Philadelphia's jammed, junky jails, city officials have one potential solution in the works: Transfer inmates to a jammed, junky jail 100 miles away. City officials are negotiating with the Passaic County Jail in Paterson, N.J., to house more than 200 inmates as soon as June 1. Michael Resnick, the city's legal counsel for public safety, said that the Paterson facility is one of "two or three" institutions that Philadelphia officials are negotiating with to alleviate crowding here.
NEWS
May 7, 2008 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The family of Timothy Goode, the grand-nephew of former Mayor W. Wilson Goode who was killed by police in January, has retained prominent civil-rights lawyer David Rudovsky and filed a formal complaint with the city's Police Advisory Commission. Rudovsky, a longtime criminal-defense lawyer and senior fellow at the University of Pennsylvania, confirmed that he was representing the family but said neither he nor the family would comment further. Timothy Goode, 24, of the Northwood section of Northeast Philadelphia, died Jan. 11 after police pursued and shot him in Germantown.
NEWS
May 1, 2008 | By Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Common Pleas Court judge warned attorneys yesterday to "ignore the wrongs of yesterday" in the retrial of a man accused of killing a Philadelphia police officer more than two decades ago. Judge Renee Caldwell Hughes made her remarks before opening arguments in the trial of Wilfredo Santiago, who was convicted of first-degree murder in the May 28, 1985, killing of Officer Thomas Trench. The officer, 43, was fatally shot in the face and neck as he sat in his patrol car at 17th and Spring Garden Streets.
NEWS
February 22, 2006 | By Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A man who spent more than 15 years in prison before charges were dropped in a Chinatown murder filed suit yesterday against the City of Philadelphia and the District Attorney's Office, contending that "systematic misconduct" had led to his wrongful conviction. The lawsuit was filed by Alen Lee, who was sentenced to life in prison in 1988 on his conviction for taking part in a robbery at the Ho Sai Gai restaurant in Chinatown during which the manager was shot to death. Lee, who was 20 at the time of his arrest, always denied his involvement, and said his arrest was a case of mistaken identity.
NEWS
November 28, 2005 | By Robert Moran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Police Officer Kenneth Fleming has cost the City of Philadelphia and an insurance company nearly $1 million in legal settlements. In one case alone, $750,000 was paid to settle a suit brought by a minister who was nearly paralyzed when Fleming threw him to the ground at Philadelphia International Airport. Fleming has been suspended for punching a court officer in front of a sitting judge, and for performing a strip search in public. He's been called a liar by the Police Department's own internal investigators.
NEWS
November 17, 2005 | By Robert Moran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Reeling from a police-as-thieves scandal in the 1990s, Philadelphia created an independent auditor's office to monitor police efforts to fight corruption and misconduct. Now the future of that office is in question. The last integrity and accountability officer, Ellen Green-Ceisler, stepped down in March to run for a judgeship; she lost. The position has remained vacant since then - and some would like the office to close permanently. Green-Ceisler's work has been praised nationally, but she clashed with the police, especially after a scathing report on failings in police discipline she released early last year that Police Commissioner Sylvester M. Johnson ripped as "false" and "disgraceful.
NEWS
April 6, 2005 | By Emilie Lounsberry and John Shiffman INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
No testimony from the former city treasurer about life in the Street administration. No Mayor Street on the stand. Not even a single character witness. Like a cascade of dominoes, defense lawyers in the Philadelphia pay-to-play trial stood up, one by one, in the federal courtroom and rested their cases Monday without calling any witnesses. After a six-week prosecution, the decision was risky: Juries generally expect a defense case and often like to hear from defendants, especially in white-collar cases.
NEWS
January 7, 2004 | By Mark Fazlollah and Michael Currie Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
A day after the Philadelphia Police Department's anticorruption czar filed a scathing report about the department's disciplinary system, Commissioner Sylvester M. Johnson lashed out yesterday at the report and its author. "This report is wrong. This report is false. And this report is disgraceful," Johnson said at a news conference at Police Headquarters. The commissioner attacked the honesty of Integrity and Accountability Officer Ellen Green-Ceisler, saying it was "disheartening" that she "would purposefully and inaccurately report facts to the public.
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