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NEWS
July 27, 1987 | By David Hiltbrand, Special to The Inquirer
Despite the heat, David Sanborn took the stage at the Mann Music Center on Saturday night in a gray silk suit and black long-sleeve shirt. The alto saxophonist then turned in a set as slick and dapper as his outfit. From the first tune, a ferociously funky "Chicago Song," to the encore, the heroic theme "Summer," Sanborn and his redoubtable backing quintet played a sharply satisfying and varied selection of music. Critics have vilified Sanborn for pandering to pop tastes. He defends himself by pointing out that he is not a jazz fusion artist at all, but an unabashed rhythm-and-blues saxophonist.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1989 | By Jonathan Takiff and Nels Nelson, Daily News Staff Writers
David Sanborn and Larry Carlton appear at 7 & 10:30 p.m. tomorrow at the Academy of Music, Broad & Locust sts. $22.50-$28.50. Info: 893-1930. DAVID SANBORN/SAXOPHONE The puissant and liquid sound of David Sanborn's alto saxophone is among the most ubiquitous public utterances of the 1980s. The late Gil Evans called it "That great cry" . . . He fills a regular guest spot on "Late Night with David Letterman" as part of the World's Most Dangerous Band and co-hosts the NBC music show "Sunday Night" in addition to his own weekly program heard nationwide on the Westwood One Radio Network . . . He has won four Grammy awards; his distinctive virtuosity has built a huge constituency for his 11 albums . . . Born some 43 years ago in Tampa, Fla., and removed to St. Louis, he spent part of his childhood in an iron lung with polio and was advised to take up a wind instrument as physical therapy . . . Probably his great musical influence was Hank Crawford of the Ray Charles band . . . He first came to prominence with the Paul Butterfield Blues Band in 1967 and later worked with Stevie Wonder, Gil Evans, James Taylor, David Bowie and the Brecker Brothers, among others, until forming his own group in 1975.
NEWS
August 22, 2014 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
UNTIL an unfortunate shooting outside Dell Music Center last week at a rap concert, things had been looking totally rosy at the Fairmount Park venue this summer. Four out of the five Essence of Entertainment concerts so far have been sellouts (5,284 seats plus 600 lawn seats). The fifth (July 24, Roberta Flack/Peabo Bryson) pulled a respectable 4,000 patrons. A recent (Aug. 1) gospel show top billed by Mary Mary sold twice as many tickets as in prior years. Overall, ticket sales at the Dell have doubled this year, and for the first time in memory patrons attempting to buy tickets the day of show have been turned away.
NEWS
June 19, 2010
Music West Oak Lane Jazz and Arts Festival Innovative jazz bassist Esperanza Spalding heads a lineup that includes George Duke, David Sanborn, Odean Pope, and Joey DeFrancesco. The West Oak Lane Jazz & Arts Festival runs through Sunday on the 7100-7400 blocks of Ogontz Avenue. Free. For schedules, directions and parking, call 1-877-965-5299 or visit www.westoaklanefestival.com .     Family The Great 12-Hour, River to River, Vine to Pine, Rain or Shine Tour of Philadelphia Use your feet to tour Philadelphia today as the Association of Philadelphia Tour Guides conduct walking tours of the city from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday.
NEWS
June 24, 1989 | By Francis Davis, Special to The Inquirer
Including last night's double bill, alto saxophonist David Sanborn and guitarist Larry Carlton, and tonight's show by Miles Davis, four out of the five 1989 Mellon Jazz Festival events held at the Academy of Music have featured amplified music of a sort usually described as fusion. Fusion - a generic term for jazz crossbred with rock and roll or funk - has dominated the festival because it's the jazz style that sells the most tickets. Meanwhile, those of us who dislike fusion risk being ridiculed as purist spoilsports.
NEWS
October 31, 1991 | By Karl Stark, Inquirer Staff Writer
With her cover-girl looks and a debut CD made partly by computer, you might expect saxophonist Candy Dulfer to be a studio creation of minor talent, a bimbo on alto. Not true. Dulfer played a mean alto that sounded more like nasty tenor, and her band of Dutch compatriots laid down some spirited funk, with traces of rhythm and blues, reggae, and even rap, on Tuesday at the Theater of Living Arts. Dulfer is no Charlie Parker, but neither is she just a lightweight parading her pulchritude.
NEWS
February 2, 1988 | By DAVE BITTAN, Daily News Staff Writer
If you've heard more Michael Jackson records than usual on Power 99 FM from 6 to 10 a.m., it's because WUSL's new "Morning Dudes," Brian Carter and David Sanborn (not the jazz saxophonist) are waging a campaign to have Jackson change his plans and stop in Philadelphia on his tour that starts this month. "How can Michael tour the United States and not play Philly?" asks Sanborn. The tour, according to its promoters, includes New York, St. Louis, Denver and other cities - "but not Philadelphia," Carter says.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2013 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
The first collaboration between keyboardist Bob James and saxophonist David Sanborn, 1986's Grammy-winning, platinum-selling Double Vision , was such a success that it's hard to believe the two smooth-jazz founding fathers took more than a quarter-century to reunite. The duo had never performed live together until their current tour, which brought them to the Keswick on Friday. "We're making up for lost time," James explained from the stage. At the same time, the duo made the surprising decision not to live in the past on their new CD, Quartette Humaine , which forgoes the keyboard-slathered smooth-jazz sound of their previous effort for a straight-ahead acoustic approach.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1999 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was during a recording session for his latest album, Monk, Miles and Me (HighNote/Muse) that Larry Coryell cried for the first time in the studio. "We were playing [John Coltrane's] 'Naima,' and it was the defining moment of that day when we recorded that cut," Coryell said. "We did it in one take, and when we finished, tears started flowing from my eyes. It was the first time I had ever cried, except for when it was really bad. . . . It was so quiet in the studio. I was just blown away by the way everyone played it. We played it the way it was supposed to be played.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1991 | By Jack Lloyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Purists often criticize jazz musicians when they crank out music that makes the grade commercially. This rap can't be put on David Sanborn, though. Even though he is routinely classified as a jazz musician, Sanborn says it just isn't so. Really. The saxophone is not exclusively a jazz instrument. It just seems that way sometimes. "It's difficult not to be influenced by jazz, considering all of the great jazz saxophonists," said Sanborn, who will perform this weekend at the Sands Hotel & Casino.
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NEWS
August 22, 2014 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
UNTIL an unfortunate shooting outside Dell Music Center last week at a rap concert, things had been looking totally rosy at the Fairmount Park venue this summer. Four out of the five Essence of Entertainment concerts so far have been sellouts (5,284 seats plus 600 lawn seats). The fifth (July 24, Roberta Flack/Peabo Bryson) pulled a respectable 4,000 patrons. A recent (Aug. 1) gospel show top billed by Mary Mary sold twice as many tickets as in prior years. Overall, ticket sales at the Dell have doubled this year, and for the first time in memory patrons attempting to buy tickets the day of show have been turned away.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2013 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
The first collaboration between keyboardist Bob James and saxophonist David Sanborn, 1986's Grammy-winning, platinum-selling Double Vision , was such a success that it's hard to believe the two smooth-jazz founding fathers took more than a quarter-century to reunite. The duo had never performed live together until their current tour, which brought them to the Keswick on Friday. "We're making up for lost time," James explained from the stage. At the same time, the duo made the surprising decision not to live in the past on their new CD, Quartette Humaine , which forgoes the keyboard-slathered smooth-jazz sound of their previous effort for a straight-ahead acoustic approach.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2013 | By Karl Stark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jazz keeps getting more international, as this review of recent album releases shows. Top players are coming from Japan and even India - via the American diaspora. At the same time, Philadelphia artists continue to evolve. City native Christian McBride, the über bassist of his generation, continues his string of successes with a new release, while a SEPTA manager, Jawanza Kobie, gets into the act, too, with a credible CD and a release party scheduled June 21 at the African American Museum in Philadelphia.
NEWS
June 19, 2010
Music West Oak Lane Jazz and Arts Festival Innovative jazz bassist Esperanza Spalding heads a lineup that includes George Duke, David Sanborn, Odean Pope, and Joey DeFrancesco. The West Oak Lane Jazz & Arts Festival runs through Sunday on the 7100-7400 blocks of Ogontz Avenue. Free. For schedules, directions and parking, call 1-877-965-5299 or visit www.westoaklanefestival.com .     Family The Great 12-Hour, River to River, Vine to Pine, Rain or Shine Tour of Philadelphia Use your feet to tour Philadelphia today as the Association of Philadelphia Tour Guides conduct walking tours of the city from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1999 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was during a recording session for his latest album, Monk, Miles and Me (HighNote/Muse) that Larry Coryell cried for the first time in the studio. "We were playing [John Coltrane's] 'Naima,' and it was the defining moment of that day when we recorded that cut," Coryell said. "We did it in one take, and when we finished, tears started flowing from my eyes. It was the first time I had ever cried, except for when it was really bad. . . . It was so quiet in the studio. I was just blown away by the way everyone played it. We played it the way it was supposed to be played.
NEWS
January 30, 1998 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
Dining with David Sanborn, of Power 99's popular Carter and Sanborn team, is a lot like watching a "Kung Fu" rerun on TV. He's full of East-meets-West wisdom. Like, for instance, the reason Chinese restaurants serve hot tea first is to aid digestion, he says. "We tend to drink a cold drink before we eat and have a cold salad," Sanborn explained, as he sipped some during a recent dinner at Cin Cin in Chestnut Hill, his favorite restaurant. "The cold is kind of a shock . . . while the warm allows the stomach to expand.
SPORTS
November 9, 1996 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
How many teenagers, first thing each school day, would spend an hour willingly listening to one of their parents talk? Grandvell Taylor, for one. Taylor, a 5-11, 170-pound senior with 4.4-second speed for 40 yards, is an impressive fullback and linebacker for Roxborough High's football team. His stepfather is David Sanborn, the co-host of Power 99's weekday morning "Carter & Sanborn Show. " "They're on from 5:30 to 10," Taylor said. "I usually listen for an hour before leaving for school.
NEWS
June 17, 1994 | by Chuck Arnold, Daily News Staff Writer
ZINGALAMADUNI Arrested Development (Chrysalis) When Arrested Development debuted in 1992 with "3 Days, 5 Months and 2 Days in the Life Of . . . " it marked the beginning of a revolution in rap. No other hip-hoppers rapped like them. No other hip-hoppers sang like them. No other hip-hoppers looked liked them. Unlike many breakthrough pop acts that get ignored for years until the rest of the world catches up with them, A.D. got major props from jump, selling lots of records and winning lots of awards.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1993 | By Bill Kent, FOR THE INQUIRER
For a musician, it doesn't get much sweeter than this. At 47, Grammy Award- winning saxophonist David Sanborn, who performs Tuesday with singer Al Jarreau at the Mann Music Center, is at the top of his career. His solo albums get airplay on commercial radio stations. He does session work with the biggest acts in the business. He lives in New York City, where people ask him for his autograph in restaurants. How did it all begin? "I wanted to get girls," Sanborn says, somewhat bashfully.
NEWS
October 31, 1991 | By Karl Stark, Inquirer Staff Writer
With her cover-girl looks and a debut CD made partly by computer, you might expect saxophonist Candy Dulfer to be a studio creation of minor talent, a bimbo on alto. Not true. Dulfer played a mean alto that sounded more like nasty tenor, and her band of Dutch compatriots laid down some spirited funk, with traces of rhythm and blues, reggae, and even rap, on Tuesday at the Theater of Living Arts. Dulfer is no Charlie Parker, but neither is she just a lightweight parading her pulchritude.
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