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Dead Presidents

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NEWS
October 4, 1995 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
If "Forrest Gump" left us with the impression the Vietnam War had been safely relegated to the realm of nostalgia, "Dead Presidents" reminds us that not everyone has made peace with that era. "Dead Presidents," the second (and unfortunately more erratic) picture from the filmmaking brothers Albert and Allen Hughes ("Menace II Society") is an angry, brooding story of the war and its effect on the young black men who helped fight it. Young men like Anthony Curtis (Larenz Tate)
NEWS
December 22, 2002 | By David Standish FOR THE INQUIRER
When traveling abroad, most of us usually think about the local currency only in terms of how many - or how few - pesos, yen or pounds constitute one U.S. dollar. We hardly pay any attention to what the money looks like. But the images and designs on a country's paper money say a lot about it. Through their money, countries project their self-image to foreigners and their own citizens, too. They reveal what's important to them, what they think is special and wonderful about themselves, and how they want to be seen by the world.
NEWS
July 1, 2003
Is a dictionary a mirror or a map? Is its job to reflect the evolution of a language as actually used, or direct the language to a proper destination? That age-old dispute will be renewed today as the 11th edition of the iconic Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary hits the bookstores. As sure as sunrise, some guardians of proper English will howl about the slang and neologisms that the gatekeepers at Merriam-Webster have allowed to creep inside the sacred precincts.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1995 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In Dead Presidents, a young black man enlists in the Marines in 1969, serves in and survives Vietnam and returns home to the Bronx in 1972 - in time for recession and revolution. This shattering saga by Allen and Albert Hughes, the identical twins who made the 1993 drama Menace II Society, packs enough for at least two epics. It is War and Peace and also Crime and Punishment. In scarcely two hours so much happens to the protagonist, Anthony, the filmmakers telegraph rather than fully develop his character.
NEWS
November 22, 1995 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
The award for Worst Premise of the Year goes to "Nick of Time," a movie about a group of conspirators who try to make an accountant kill the governor of California. Why? Oh, just for the heck of it. The murderers have unlimited financing, access to all the expert killers, guns and ammo they could possibly want. Yet they bypass their extensive assassination infrastructure by going to a train station and randomly selecting a complete stranger to do the job. He is a timid accountant (Johnny Depp)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1996 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
When asked why he robbed banks, Willie Sutton responded with exasperation: "Because that's where the money is. " The girlz from the hood in Set It Off have a better excuse, since they are themselves victims of injustice. In the early going of F. Gary Gray's loud and lively movie, that emphasis is enough to let some fresh air into a genre in which cliches are as plentiful as spent bullets from an Uzi. The four young women who pick up automatic weaponry are more than distaff versions of their disgruntled brethren in pictures such as Dead Presidents.
NEWS
June 6, 1997 | Daily News wire services
SANTA FE SPRINGS Factory worker kills 2, himself in gunfire A plastics factory employee infuriated by an argument at work fatally shot two co-workers and wounded four others yesterday, then fled and killed himself. Less than two hours after shooting his colleagues, Daniel S. Marsden accosted two women on a Los Angeles street corner and blurted, "This is my last day!" before sticking a gun barrel in his mouth and pulling the trigger. Marsden was declared dead at Martin Luther King Jr.-Drew Medical Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1995 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
At the movies this year - perhaps symbolic of the place where they are made - the inmates took over the asylum, whether in the submarine thriller Crimson Tide or the impressionistic political biography Nixon. It was also a year that screenwriters hit the books - mostly children's stories such as Babe, the Gallant Pig and A Little Princess; and Jane Austen novels such as Sense and Sensibility and Persuasion - for inspiration. And it was a year in which nearly everyone exploited the Internet - with the prominent exception of Hollywood, which tried but failed to reconcile the big screen with the computer screen in duds such as Hackers and Virtuosity.
NEWS
June 13, 1996 | by Tonya Pendleton, Daily News Staff Writer
You may think you know Omar Epps. He has that air of familiarity about him. He may remind you of your brother, your son, your boyfriend or your homie who's always got your back when there's trouble. And while he may not have arrived yet, he's certainly got a ticket. Epps was the young and ambitious DJ in "Juice," his first film. In "The Program," he was the sexy football player who took Halle Berry away from her boring boyfriend. In "Higher Learning," he personified the challenges of being young, black and male on a college campus.
LIVING
June 10, 1996 | This story contains material from Inquirer staff writer Michael Klein, the Associated Press and Reuters
Striped Bass co-owner Neil Stein is more philosophical than angry about Alison Barshak's Friday night resignation as his executive chef. "We all say good-bye at some point in our lives," he said yesterday. "But there's a way to say good-bye. " Barshak left notes on the desks of Stein and his partner, Joe Wolf, then disappeared on a weekend trip to Las Vegas. "She didn't even tell her staff!" said Stein, who is interviewing replacements inside and outside the Walnut Street eatery.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2014 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
The encore portion of Jay Z's Magna Carter World Tour concert at the Wells Fargo Center on Wednesday - which, appropriately enough, began with "Encore" - lasted for five songs altogether. For the record, the other four songs were "Empire State of Mind," "Izzo (H.O.V.A)," "Hard Knock Life (Ghetto Anthem)," and the feel-good closer "Young Forever," which was dedicated to Nelson Mandela. In total, however, the five songs didn't last as long as an interlude in the middle, when the rapper-mogul and Made in America main man, who was playing a non-festival solo show in Philadelphia for the first time since 2009, took the music down and had the cameras turned on the audience - for a good 15 minutes of bonding with his people.
SPORTS
July 6, 2009
THERE MAY have been weirder Fourth of Julys in the 233-year history of the Republic. But none come to mind. Not even July 4, 1826. John Adams, America's second president, and Thomas Jefferson, the nation's third, marked the 50th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence - written by Jefferson - by dying just hours apart. Can you imagine the field day CNN would have had with that? "Coming up at the top of the hour, Larry King's exclusive interview with Thomas Jefferson's mistress, Sally Hemmings . . . " But enough of dead presidents . . . And, yeah, the young nation's fifth chief executive, James Monroe, exited a hemisphere secured by his hands-off Monroe Doctrine on July 4, 1831.
NEWS
July 1, 2003
Is a dictionary a mirror or a map? Is its job to reflect the evolution of a language as actually used, or direct the language to a proper destination? That age-old dispute will be renewed today as the 11th edition of the iconic Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary hits the bookstores. As sure as sunrise, some guardians of proper English will howl about the slang and neologisms that the gatekeepers at Merriam-Webster have allowed to creep inside the sacred precincts.
NEWS
December 22, 2002 | By David Standish FOR THE INQUIRER
When traveling abroad, most of us usually think about the local currency only in terms of how many - or how few - pesos, yen or pounds constitute one U.S. dollar. We hardly pay any attention to what the money looks like. But the images and designs on a country's paper money say a lot about it. Through their money, countries project their self-image to foreigners and their own citizens, too. They reveal what's important to them, what they think is special and wonderful about themselves, and how they want to be seen by the world.
NEWS
June 6, 1997 | Daily News wire services
SANTA FE SPRINGS Factory worker kills 2, himself in gunfire A plastics factory employee infuriated by an argument at work fatally shot two co-workers and wounded four others yesterday, then fled and killed himself. Less than two hours after shooting his colleagues, Daniel S. Marsden accosted two women on a Los Angeles street corner and blurted, "This is my last day!" before sticking a gun barrel in his mouth and pulling the trigger. Marsden was declared dead at Martin Luther King Jr.-Drew Medical Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1996 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
When asked why he robbed banks, Willie Sutton responded with exasperation: "Because that's where the money is. " The girlz from the hood in Set It Off have a better excuse, since they are themselves victims of injustice. In the early going of F. Gary Gray's loud and lively movie, that emphasis is enough to let some fresh air into a genre in which cliches are as plentiful as spent bullets from an Uzi. The four young women who pick up automatic weaponry are more than distaff versions of their disgruntled brethren in pictures such as Dead Presidents.
NEWS
June 13, 1996 | by Tonya Pendleton, Daily News Staff Writer
You may think you know Omar Epps. He has that air of familiarity about him. He may remind you of your brother, your son, your boyfriend or your homie who's always got your back when there's trouble. And while he may not have arrived yet, he's certainly got a ticket. Epps was the young and ambitious DJ in "Juice," his first film. In "The Program," he was the sexy football player who took Halle Berry away from her boring boyfriend. In "Higher Learning," he personified the challenges of being young, black and male on a college campus.
LIVING
June 10, 1996 | This story contains material from Inquirer staff writer Michael Klein, the Associated Press and Reuters
Striped Bass co-owner Neil Stein is more philosophical than angry about Alison Barshak's Friday night resignation as his executive chef. "We all say good-bye at some point in our lives," he said yesterday. "But there's a way to say good-bye. " Barshak left notes on the desks of Stein and his partner, Joe Wolf, then disappeared on a weekend trip to Las Vegas. "She didn't even tell her staff!" said Stein, who is interviewing replacements inside and outside the Walnut Street eatery.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1995 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
At the movies this year - perhaps symbolic of the place where they are made - the inmates took over the asylum, whether in the submarine thriller Crimson Tide or the impressionistic political biography Nixon. It was also a year that screenwriters hit the books - mostly children's stories such as Babe, the Gallant Pig and A Little Princess; and Jane Austen novels such as Sense and Sensibility and Persuasion - for inspiration. And it was a year in which nearly everyone exploited the Internet - with the prominent exception of Hollywood, which tried but failed to reconcile the big screen with the computer screen in duds such as Hackers and Virtuosity.
NEWS
November 22, 1995 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
The award for Worst Premise of the Year goes to "Nick of Time," a movie about a group of conspirators who try to make an accountant kill the governor of California. Why? Oh, just for the heck of it. The murderers have unlimited financing, access to all the expert killers, guns and ammo they could possibly want. Yet they bypass their extensive assassination infrastructure by going to a train station and randomly selecting a complete stranger to do the job. He is a timid accountant (Johnny Depp)
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