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Deaf Man

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NEWS
May 27, 1987 | By Kitty Dumas, Inquirer Staff Writer
A trial to decide whether the Mobil Oil Corp. discriminated against a Greenwich Township man who is deaf began yesterday in Gloucester County Superior Court. John Minnite, 30, of Gibbstown, contends that officials at the company's East Greenwich plant dismissed him from a training program in 1977 because he is deaf, and he is seeking compensatory and punitive damages. Minnite lost his hearing over a five-year period because of Cogan's syndrome, a rare infection, according to court documents.
NEWS
October 26, 1992 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Is a police officer required to provide a sign language interpreter to a deaf-mute suspected of being a drunk driver before a breathalyzer test is conducted? No, said the state Superior Court last week. "Since a breathalyzer test is not considered an interrogation or a criminal proceeding . . . we cannot hold that deaf persons have a constitutionally protected liberty interest to an interpreter before exercising a refusal to submit to a breathalyzer test," the appeals court said.
NEWS
September 26, 2012 | Breaking News Desk
A 27-year-old deaf man was shot and critically wounded this morning when he apparently did not respond fast enough to a robber's demand for money in Kensington, police said. The victim was sitting on the stoop of his residence on the 1800 block of East Thayer Street about 4:30 a.m. when the gunman approached and announced the robbery, robbery. The man did not respond immediately and the gunman fired once, hitting the victim in the stomach. He was taken to Temple University Hospital, where he was reported in critical but stable condition.
NEWS
December 12, 1994 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Common Pleas Judge Arthur S. Kafrissen has ruled that a legally deaf North Philadelphia man should have had a sign-language interpreter when he was tried and convicted of shooting at two people in 1988. Last week, Kafrissen granted Tyrone Wallace a new trial. Wallace then pleaded guilty to aggravated assault charges, and was immediately sentenced to five to 20 years in prison, giving him hope of winning an early release. Defense lawyer Wayne Sachs said that because Wallace has been behind bars for more than six years fighting his case, he was eligible to apply for parole.
NEWS
November 15, 1986 | Special to The Inquirer
A deaf Lancaster County man who was named a 1986 Outstanding Young Pennsylvanian by the Jaycees earlier this year has pleaded guilty to raping a college student. Donald F. Johnston Jr., 29, of Denver, Pa., was sentenced Thursday to a mandatory five to 10 years in jail after he told Lancaster County Judge D. Richard Eckman through a sign-language interpreter that his violent act stemmed from frustrations at not being able to hear in a "hearing world. " "I know God is angry with me for this and it is my punishment," he signed to the judge.
NEWS
August 2, 2010
She lives in a world of silence. So does he. But even if he couldn't hear her screams, police said, the 18-year-old deaf youth knew that what he did to a 13-year-old deaf girl was wrong. The youth, Rafael Moley, sexually assaulted the girl Saturday night in a city park, police said. Moley knew his victim because both attended a school for the deaf, cops said. The assault allegedly occurred at a gathering in Harrowgate Park, near the intersection of Tioga Street and Kensington Avenue in Northeast Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 31, 1994 | By Suzanne Gordon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A habit of walking the train tracks to save time may have cost a Collingdale man his life. Frank S. Jackson, 34, was struck and killed about 10 p.m. Sunday by a southbound freight train about 20 feet from the entrance to a tunnel on the tracks between Darby and Sharon Hill. Sharon Hill Police Officer Bob Tinsley said that the train engineer saw Jackson lying across the tracks and sounded his whistle, but that it was too late. Jackson, who was deaf, was carried about 20 feet into the tunnel, which runs beneath Chester Pike, Tinsley said.
NEWS
August 25, 1987 | BY CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER
Jim Dickson, a blind man, tried to sail the Atlantic alone. He didn't make it. He did, however, make it to Bermuda. Curiously, this has led to a debate. Columnist William F. Buckley disapproves on grounds that there is no point to a blind man trying to sail. It is against nature. "If you cannot see the water and the skies, why are you going on a sailboat to begin with?" Dickson is trying "to do that which (his) handicap inherently proscribes. " Sailing is an experience simply not accessible to the blind, says Buckley.
NEWS
October 10, 1987 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
A deaf man tells another deaf man about the violinist who went into the jungle to play for the animals. Lions and tigers and other creatures gathered quietly around him and listened in rapt attention. Then a panther leaped out of a tree and killed the musician. "Why did you kill him?" a lion asked the panther. The panther put a paw behind one ear and said: "Eh?" This bitter little joke is just one small example, said anthropologist Simon Carmel, of the complex and vital culture of the deaf, a culture hidden from the hearing world.
NEWS
March 26, 1989 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the world of the deaf, Robin Wood speaks with a loud voice. As a state rehabilitation counselor, she's worked to better the lives of deaf people across Montgomery and Bucks counties. She's taught at the Pennsylvania School for the Deaf in Philadelphia, and teaches American Sign Language at Montgomery County Community College. At times she's interpreted for Gov. Casey and Mayor Goode. Now the Abington woman has turned her attention to AIDS and its implications for the deaf community.
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NEWS
September 26, 2012 | Breaking News Desk
A 27-year-old deaf man was shot and critically wounded this morning when he apparently did not respond fast enough to a robber's demand for money in Kensington, police said. The victim was sitting on the stoop of his residence on the 1800 block of East Thayer Street about 4:30 a.m. when the gunman approached and announced the robbery, robbery. The man did not respond immediately and the gunman fired once, hitting the victim in the stomach. He was taken to Temple University Hospital, where he was reported in critical but stable condition.
NEWS
November 5, 2011 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
A deaf, mute, and illiterate man charged in a Montgomery County drug trafficking case will never be able to stand trial because of his inability to communicate, his attorney said in court filings. Lawyers petitioned Common Pleas Court last week to drop charges against Juan Jose Gonzalez Luna, 43, due to his supposed powerlessness to participate in his own defense or understand the legal proceedings against him. His case - part of an investigation into an international drug smuggling ring based in King of Prussia - has drawn attention to the challenges defendants with limited language capabilities pose to the legal system - obstacles, prosecutors say, that made Gonzalez a perfect criminal.
NEWS
August 2, 2010
She lives in a world of silence. So does he. But even if he couldn't hear her screams, police said, the 18-year-old deaf youth knew that what he did to a 13-year-old deaf girl was wrong. The youth, Rafael Moley, sexually assaulted the girl Saturday night in a city park, police said. Moley knew his victim because both attended a school for the deaf, cops said. The assault allegedly occurred at a gathering in Harrowgate Park, near the intersection of Tioga Street and Kensington Avenue in Northeast Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 2, 2006 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The deaf fellowship group that meets every month at the Burlington Center Mall started out two years ago with no deaf members. Teresa Killingsworth of Franklinville and a few sign-language students met at the Chick-fil-A to talk and practice their signing. One day, a deaf man saw them, and through him the word began to spread. Today, the club gathers every third Monday in the food court for two hours, when a mix of deaf and hearing members chats about faith, families and their lives.
NEWS
December 29, 1997 | By Angela Couloumbis, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Wayne Roorda stands in the middle of his cramped living room, a half-smile on his face, as a Mozart concerto thunders from the speakers, and Star Trek images flicker across the television, which is turned down to a low but steady hum. "Can you hear the violins?" he asks, not waiting for a response. "The clarity is superb. Crisp. Magnificent. " In the kitchen, the tea kettle begins to shriek, and the sound floats out to the living room, clumsily mingling with the music and the noise from the television.
NEWS
June 13, 1995 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Vera Coward, the former SEPTA bus driver who was found guilty of slashing a deaf passenger last year, was sentenced to five to 10 years in prison yesterday. Coward's ailing mother, Sarah Coward, 73, who had pleaded with Common Pleas Judge Anne E. Lazarus to free her daughter because, "I need her so bad," collapsed in the front of the courtroom after the sentencing. Relatives rushed to her side. She was later helped out before a rescue squad arrived. Vera Coward, who has a history of disputes with passengers, told Lazarus she was sorry for the injury she caused Kevin DeFrancisco, 39, on her bus at Richmond and Ann streets on Aug. 24, 1994.
NEWS
April 4, 1995 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Kevin DeFrancisco, 35, said the SEPTA bus driver didn't believe he was deaf and refused to honor his discount card. Then, when he tried to explain with "gestures and motions," Vera Coward, 35, slashed him across the left side of his face, leaving him with a 9-inch scar. He required 58 stitches. Yesterday, during the first day of Coward's trial, defense lawyer David Fischer said his client acted in self-defense after DeFrancisco, of Fishtown, punched her after getting on the bus at Richmond and Ann streets, on Aug. 24, 1994.
NEWS
December 12, 1994 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Common Pleas Judge Arthur S. Kafrissen has ruled that a legally deaf North Philadelphia man should have had a sign-language interpreter when he was tried and convicted of shooting at two people in 1988. Last week, Kafrissen granted Tyrone Wallace a new trial. Wallace then pleaded guilty to aggravated assault charges, and was immediately sentenced to five to 20 years in prison, giving him hope of winning an early release. Defense lawyer Wayne Sachs said that because Wallace has been behind bars for more than six years fighting his case, he was eligible to apply for parole.
NEWS
May 31, 1994 | By Suzanne Gordon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A habit of walking the train tracks to save time may have cost a Collingdale man his life. Frank S. Jackson, 34, was struck and killed about 10 p.m. Sunday by a southbound freight train about 20 feet from the entrance to a tunnel on the tracks between Darby and Sharon Hill. Sharon Hill Police Officer Bob Tinsley said that the train engineer saw Jackson lying across the tracks and sounded his whistle, but that it was too late. Jackson, who was deaf, was carried about 20 feet into the tunnel, which runs beneath Chester Pike, Tinsley said.
NEWS
April 5, 1994 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A deaf Bridgeport man has sued the Upper Merion Area School District, contending that the district violated federal civil rights laws by refusing to provide him with a sign language interpreter in the adult school course he is attending. William F. Oehler filed the suit yesterday in U.S. District Court here, contending that the district violated his rights under the three-year-old Americans with Disabilities Act and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as well as his due process rights under the Constitution.
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