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Death Penalty

NEWS
May 16, 1989 | By JONATHAN POWER
Every day of the year someone, somewhere, is executed. On an average day, the score runs to about 25: hanged, shot, gassed, electrocuted, poisoned, beheaded or stoned to death by judicial order. Some of the 25 are killed minutes after sentence is passed. Others are killed years after the judge stepped out of the courtroom; on occasion, as in the U.S. and Japan, after a decade or two of waiting. One hundred countries allow the death penalty. Eighty do not. Some use it irregularly and rarely; others unhesitatingly and frequently.
NEWS
September 17, 1993 | By Stephanie Grace, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The two men who allegedly robbed and fatally stabbed a Delran gas station attendant last February could face the death penalty if convicted, Burlington County Prosecutor Stephen G. Raymond announced yesterday. The announcement came after a grand jury voted to indict Alonzo Bryant, 27, of Willingboro, and Robert W. Morton, 26, of Burlington Township, on 15 counts ranging from robbery to capital murder. Raymond said he planned to seek the death penalty because, among other reasons, the two men allegedly killed 39-year-old Michael Eck of Delanco simply to eliminate him as a witness to the robbery.
NEWS
June 6, 2008
REGARDING Robert Boyden's op-ed ("The Mumia factor in the killing of cops," June 2): His analysis is surprisingly misguided and callow, especially coming from a former police officer and, ostensibly, professional consultant in the criminal- justice system. He asserts a direct connection between Mumia Abu-Jamal's continued incarceration and the death of at least three police officers here in Philadelphia in recent years. The conclusion is not just a gross oversimplification, it is also unsupported by the facts behind violent criminal activity.
NEWS
November 11, 1993 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The convicted killer got more than just the death penalty yesterday. He also got a lecture from the judge. After a jury, which returned a first-degree murder verdict, ordered Andre J. Thompson, 31, to die for a contract killing last year, Common Pleas Judge Robert A. Latrone said he didn't feel sorry for him. "You've been exploiting us all," by ripping off the welfare system, and requiring the state to pay for legal fees, said the judge....
NEWS
April 9, 2007
THE STORY I read about young Leon Harris ("4 charged with paralyzing teen," March 28) incensed me. I fashion myself rather liberal and forgiving, but enough is enough. What happened to this young man is sick and disgusting and unfair and wrong. He sounds like a beautiful young man who was making the world a better place and contributing to society - the direct opposite of the wastes of oxygen who forever scarred and changed his life. I'm sure the usual tired cliches will be tossed out about how these four criminals came from broken homes, were let down by the system, blah-blah-blah.
NEWS
May 20, 2003 | By Jane Eisner
This is one of those instances when I will admit, openly and honestly, to being out of touch with American public opinion. Yesterday, the Gallup Organization released its latest update on the death penalty, and it showed what I suppose those of you in the majority already know: Support for capital punishment remains strong. Yes, even when states such as Illinois and Maryland have imposed moratoriums on executions, even when judges in Pennsylvania and lawmakers in New Jersey think the current system is flawed, Americans seem to have few qualms about using this final form of punishment.
NEWS
September 10, 2003 | By ELMER SMITH
NICHOLAS James Yarris is just biding his time. You can get good at that after 22 years on death row. "He was in good spirits when I saw him [last week]," his mother Jayne Yarris told me Monday. "He's a very positive person" As positive as a person can be after spending 23 hours a day in a cage waiting for someone to tell him when he's going to die. If the system wasn't so balky, we could have buried him by now. His would have been just another mostly wasted life whose ceremonial termination is somehow supposed to balance the books for the loss of a valued member of society.
NEWS
December 6, 1986 | By Elizabeth Hallowell, Special to The Inquirer (United Press International contributed to this article.)
The death penalty will be sought for a convict charged with slaying a Kenton woman hours after he and three others escaped from prison, a state prosecutor said yesterday. At a preliminary hearing in Kent County Court of Common Pleas, Judge Merrill C. Trader ordered evidence linking David Dawson, 31, of Millsboro, to the slaying of Madeline M. Kisner, 44, to be turned over to a grand jury. Dawson, one of four convicts who escaped Monday from the Delaware Correctional Center near Smyrna, was arrested early Tuesday morning and charged in Kisner's slaying.
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