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Death Penalty

ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2012 | By A.D. Amorosi and FOR THE INQUIRER
The Philadelphia poet, painter, musician, and activist Aja Beech spent the Memorial Day weekend — whose official observance commemorates those who died serving their country — finalizing the annual "Execute Art Not People" event, which seeks to redirect state funds from prison death rows to arts and education programs.   "With everyone volunteering time and space, we had to work around some very busy schedules — quite a round-the-clock labor of love," says Beech, noting this year's participation by Rittenhouse Square's Ethical Society, host of Friday's exhibition, and the Mural Arts Program, which will hold a related interactive painting session.
NEWS
March 1, 2005
I NEED someone to explain something to me. If your grandmother or other relative was brutally murdered like Marie Lindgren, how could you not want the death penalty for the low-lifes who did it? I don't want the perpetrators to be able to watch cable, get educated, spend my hard-earned tax dollars and eventually come out into the world again. They took a human life and - in my eyes - they would do it again! I say give the death penalty without any appeals! Silvia Puglia-Velykis Philadelphia
NEWS
May 11, 2013 | By Thomas J. Sheeran, Associated Press
CLEVELAND - Prosecutors said Thursday they may seek the death penalty against Ariel Castro, the man accused of imprisoning three women at his home for a decade, as police charged that he impregnated one of his captives at least five times and made her miscarry by starving her and punching her in the belly. The allegations were contained in a police report that also said another woman, Amanda Berry, was forced to give birth in a plastic kiddie pool. Cuyahoga County prosecutor Timothy McGinty said his office will decide whether to bring aggravated-murder charges punishable by death in connection with the pregnancies that were terminated by force.
NEWS
March 7, 2002
Joshua Marquis says "the death penalty is properly reserved for the worst of the worst" (Commentary, March 1) and that our death penalty study is "just inflammatory assertions. " Clearly, Marquis never read our study. It says, "If we are going to have the death penalty, it should be reserved for the worst of the worst. The more often officials use the death penalty, the wider the range of crimes to which it is applied, and the more it is imposed for offenses that are not highly aggravated, the greater the risk that capital convictions and sentences will be seriously flawed.
NEWS
July 8, 2000
Over the decades since the U.S. Supreme Court declared the death penalty unconstitutional in 1972, most states have drawn up laws to enumerate "aggravating circumstances" and legitimize executions. Some in a big way. They also have designed regulations to ensure fair administration of the law. But as the nation takes a closer look at the system - hundreds of executions later - some Americans wonder with good reason whether it's possible to administer the death penalty fairly.
NEWS
June 15, 2006 | By Lorry Post
My wife, June, and I are among family members of murder victims who believe life in prison without parole is more just than the death penalty. Those of us who have endured a loved one's murder need support and justice. We don't want excuses when the system doesn't deliver, and we certainly don't want to be used to promote someone else's agenda. Unfortunately, we often are. But some answers may soon be on the horizon. A legislatively mandated commission to study the death penalty in New Jersey embarked on its work last week.
NEWS
April 6, 2012 | By Shannon Young and Andrew Welsh-Huggins, Associated Press
HARTFORD, Conn. - After executing just one prisoner in more than 50 years, Connecticut moved Thursday to become the fifth state in five years to do away with the death penalty for good. But the repeal wouldn't be a lifeline for the state's 11 death-row inmates, including two men who killed a woman and two children in a horrifying home invasion that death-penalty supporters touted as a key reason to keep the law on the books. The state Senate debated for hours Thursday about whether the law would reverse those sentences before voting 20-16 to repeal the law. After the state Senate's 20-16 Thursday vote to repeal the law, the state's heavily Democratic House is expected to follow with approval within weeks.
NEWS
July 9, 1994 | Los Angeles Daily News
A committee process in the district attorney's office that is often criticized by defense attorneys will be used to determine whether prosecutors will seek the death penalty for O.J. Simpson. District Attorney Gil Garcetti said yesterday a decision whether to seek the gas chamber, or life in prison without parole, for Simpson will be made soon. During that process, prosecutors also will confirm whether the evidence supports a special circumstance allegation of multiple murder against Simpson.
NEWS
March 1, 1990 | By Kathy Brennan, Daily News Staff Writer
As Gov. Casey began reviewing three dozen death warrants awaiting his signature, opponents of capital punishment vowed to renew their efforts to banish the death penalty in Pennsylvania. Both actions came in the wake of yesterday's 5-4 decision by the U.S. Supreme Court that upheld the state's death penalty laws and, by extension, similar laws in 13 other states. Casey has signed three death warrants since taking office three years ago, but all have been stayed by appeals.
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