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Death Penalty

NEWS
March 5, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A man on death row will not be executed Wednesday, after the state's highest court denied the Philadelphia district attorney's request to an expedited decision on a petition seeking to overturn Gov. Wolf's temporary reprieve. Terry Williams, 48, was sentenced to die in 1984 for the killing of Amos Norwood, a 56-year-old Germantown church volunteer. In February, Wolf issued a temporary reprieve on all executions, saying he wanted to see the results of a long-delayed report on the state's death penalty first.
NEWS
February 20, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
DISTRICT ATTORNEY Seth Williams is fighting what he calls "an unconstitutional takeover of powers" lobbied by newly elected Gov. Wolf. In a statement yesterday, Williams announced that he's filed a petition to the state Supreme Court to reject Wolf's recent moratorium on the death penalty in Pennsylvania. "Just weeks ago, Governor Wolf took an oath to faithfully execute his duties in accordance with the Constitution of the commonwealth of Pennsylvania," Williams said in the statement.
NEWS
February 18, 2015
LAST WEEK, Gov. Wolf announced a moratorium on the death penalty in Pennsylvania. He cited as reasons a system riddled with flaws, and said that the penalty is expensive and often applied unfairly. Wolf's move is to be lauded. The only thing we disagree with is his call for a task-force report on the state's death penalty. Another report? There are numerous reports and studies on the subject of the death penalty in general and in Pennsylvania in particular. For example, as recently as 2007, the American Bar Association released the results of a four-year Death Penalty Assessment project it conducted for eight states, including Pennsylvania.
NEWS
February 18, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
The Old Testament's recommendation of an "eye for an eye" to compensate an injured party has been cited over the ages by proponents of capital punishment. Meanwhile, death penalty opponents note the New Testament's directive to set aside the desire for retribution and "turn the other cheek" when slapped. No biblical debate is required, however, to determine the value of capital punishment. There is more than enough empirical evidence to show that the practice is neither fair nor cost-effective and that it fails to deter violent crime.
NEWS
February 18, 2015
WHOA, Gov. Wolf, you are not going to gain favoritism with your new constituents by putting a hold on Pennsylvania's death penalty. There are horrible criminals on Pennsylvania's death row who should get what they deserve for killing innocent people: their own death. This is not the way to go. Eric Frein will definitely get the death penalty for killing the state trooper. So, you are not going to sign his death warrant? The family of the trooper wants Frein dead, and for you to keep him alive will not go well, especially if you want to be re-elected.
NEWS
February 16, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian and Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Staff Writers
Pennsylvania's death penalty - used just three times since 1978 but as controversial as ever - was shelved by Gov. Wolf on Friday until after he gets the report of a task force studying the future of capital punishment. Acting on concerns he first expressed during last year's campaign, the new governor cited a wave of exonerations nationwide and questions about the effectiveness of executions. "This decision is based on a flawed system that has been proven to be an endless cycle of court proceedings as well as ineffective, unjust, and expensive," Wolf said.
NEWS
January 31, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
MILFORD, Pa. - He eluded police for nearly two months, and has been jailed for three more. But the death-penalty trial for Eric Frein could still be more than a year away. On Thursday, Frein pleaded not guilty to charges he plotted the ambush that killed one state trooper and wounded a second last September in nearby Blooming Grove. It was his first court appearance since prosecutors officially declared they would seek the death penalty against him. In a brief court appearance via video feed from the Pike County prison, the self-styled survivalist remained expressionless and responded politely to County Court Judge Gregory H. Chelak.
NEWS
January 29, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Prosecutors are seeking the death penalty against Eric Frein, the man accused of shooting two Pennsylvania state troopers in Pike County in September. Though Pike County District Attorney Raymond J. Tonkin had said he intended to seek the death penalty in the case, he made it official by filing a formal notice in court Tuesday. "We anticipated that he would file the notice seeking the death penalty, and so it's not a surprise," said Michael Weinstein, one of Frein's court-appointed attorneys.
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