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Death Penalty

NEWS
July 10, 2013 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a deal to avoid the death penalty, a Bucks County man pleaded guilty Monday to kidnapping and killing his former girlfriend in 2010. The agreement was spawned by Kenneth Patterson's willingness - after more than two years - to tell authorities where he hid the body of Diane Corado, whom he had beaten with a metal pipe. Patterson, 50, will serve life in prison without the possibility of parole. "This is definitely a heinous crime," Bucks County First Assistant District Attorney Michelle Henry told reporters after the sentencing.
NEWS
July 9, 2013 | BY KIRK BLOODSWORTH
ALMOST EXACTLY 20 years ago, I became the first death-row prisoner in the United States to clear my name through DNA evidence. The crime for which I was convicted was the brutal rape and murder of a 9-year-old girl named Dawn Hamilton. My community in Maryland was devastated and needed someone to blame, so the district attorney's office built a capital case against me based on a few flimsy pieces of so-called evidence. My arrest followed my neighbor's call to the police, in which she claimed that I resembled the sketch shown on TV - a sketch that had been crafted through the eyewitness accounts of two young boys.
NEWS
June 27, 2013 | By Juan A. Lozano, Associated Press
HUNTSVILLE, Texas - Texas marked a solemn moment in criminal justice Wednesday evening, executing its 500th inmate since it resumed carrying out capital punishment in 1982. Kimberly McCarthy, who was put to death for the murder of her 71-year-old neighbor, was also the first woman executed in the United States in nearly three years. McCarthy, 52, was executed for the 1997 robbery, beating, and fatal stabbing of retired college psychology professor Dorothy Booth. Booth had agreed to give McCarthy a cup of sugar before she was attacked with a butcher knife and candelabra at her home in Lancaster, about 15 miles south of Dallas.
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three motions filed this week in Montgomery County Court suggest some of the arguments defense attorneys will make in the case of a man charged with killing a baby and her grandmother last year at the King of Prussia apartment complex where they all lived. The charges against Raghunandan Yandamuri, 27, include two counts of first-degree murder, two counts of second-degree murder, and kidnapping for ransom. The Montgomery County District Attorney's Office is seeking the death penalty in the case.
NEWS
June 18, 2013
Jim Holshouser, 78, who was North Carolina's first Republican governor of the 20th century, died Monday. In a statement released by Gov. Pat McCrory's office, Mr. Holshouser's family said he had been in declining health. Mr. Holshouser was a state legislator who became North Carolina's youngest governor at 38 when he was swept into office by President Richard Nixon's 1972 electoral landslide. He served a single term. He is remembered for establishing rural health clinics, laying the plan for a criminal justice information system, and reorganizing state government.
NEWS
June 13, 2013 | Associated Press
CLEVELAND - The man accused of holding three women captive in his home for about a decade pleaded not guilty yesterday to hundreds of rape and kidnapping charges, and the defense hinted at avoiding a trial with a plea deal if the death penalty were ruled out. The death penalty is in play because among the accusations facing Ariel Castro is that he forced a miscarriage by one of the women, which is considered a killing under Ohio law. That charge doesn't...
NEWS
June 13, 2013 | By Thomas J. Sheeran, Associated Press
CLEVELAND - A man accused of holding three women captive in his home for about a decade pleaded not guilty Wednesday to hundreds of rape and kidnapping charges, and the defense hinted at avoiding a trial with a plea deal if the death penalty were ruled out. The death penalty is in play because among the accusations facing Ariel Castro, 52, is that he forced one of the women to miscarry, which is considered a killing under Ohio law. That charge doesn't...
NEWS
June 2, 2013 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia jury on Friday ordered the death penalty for Kaboni Savage, who became one of the city's most notorious criminals by orchestrating the murders of government witnesses, their relatives, and rivals who threatened him or his sprawling drug operation. The federal court panel deliberated about 10 hours over two days before unanimously recommending that Savage be executed for 12 murders, including a 2004 firebombing in North Philadelphia that killed four children and two women related to a witness cooperating with the FBI. U.S. District Judge R. Barclay Surrick said he would impose the sentence Monday.
NEWS
May 31, 2013 | By Gene Johnson, Associated Press
SEATTLE - The Army staff sergeant charged with slaughtering 16 villagers in one of the worst atrocities of the Afghanistan war will plead guilty to avoid the death penalty in a deal that requires him to recount the horrific attack for the first time, his attorney said Wednesday. Staff Sgt. Robert Bales was "crazed" and "broken" when he slipped away from his remote southern Afghanistan outpost and attacked mud-walled compounds in two slumbering villages nearby, lawyer John Henry Browne said.
NEWS
May 23, 2013 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kaboni Savage should die, a prosecutor said Tuesday, because he wantonly slaughtered children and witnesses, and because he laughed about it and vowed that even prison could not stop him from plotting more deaths. "The fight don't stop 'til the casket drop" was his mantra, Assistant U.S. Attorney David Troyer told a federal jury. The drug kingpin should live, Savage's lawyer countered, because his past was shaped by tragedy in a North Philadelphia neighborhood overrun by crime and drugs, and because even a life of solitary confinement in a tiny windowless cell might make a difference.
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