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Decades

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NEWS
October 21, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mike, the funny one, got serious for a second and explained the whole thing like this: "There's a law in Philly neighborhoods that says friends must stay together for life. " Adhering to the letter of that particular precept, eight pals who grew up in West Oak Lane in the 1950s and '60s gathered at a home in Rydal, Montgomery County, on Sunday, repeating a frequent ritual they've followed for decades. Ostensibly, the guys were there to play half-ball and step ball, eat pretzels, and bust one another's chops with no mercy.
NEWS
January 3, 2016 | By Joe Sylvester, SUNBURY (Pa.) DAILY ITEM
SUNBURY, Pa. - Michael Johns and Tom "Randy" Chalmers became the best of friends in the worst of places. Barely 20, the fellow radio operators in an Army mortar platoon in Vietnam formed a bond as they tried to stay alive during some of the fiercest fighting of the war. Johns, of Kulpmont, and Chalmers, of Poughkeepsie, N.Y., became so inseparable, they convinced some of the local villagers that they were brothers with different fathers. When his yearlong tour was up in October 1968, Johns, now of rural Sunbury, gave Chalmers one of his dog tags, and told him to give it back to him the next time they saw each other.
NEWS
December 15, 1993 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Willingboro Township Clerk Lenore Stern, 57, who with a friendly and caring manner helped keep the municipal government running smoothly for the last two decades, died of cancer Monday at her home, in Willingboro. "The last six months of her life, she lived because of her work," said her daughter Faith Waugh of Port Ewen, N.Y. "She thrived on getting phone calls from the township, asking what they should do. She liked being needed. " Even in her home life, others came first - her three children and her husband, Jesse B. Stern, now deceased.
NEWS
January 12, 2004 | By Gaiutra Bahadur INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Four decades of working in the United States has left Carlos Diaz-Nunez, 63, a shrunken man. His face is lined with wrinkles, his left leg crushed by a box of mushrooms six years ago. This farmhand from Mexico, despite his shriveled frame, carries much on his shoulders: His life reflects how the United States has met its desire and need for low-wage, low-skilled workers through its immigration policy over six decades. He came to the United States as a bracero, one of millions of Mexican laborers with temporary work permits who streamed onto U.S. farms from the days of World War II to 1964.
NEWS
September 1, 2015 | Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Everyone knows the odds in Philadelphia elections: Democrats hold a seven-to-one edge over Republicans, who last elected a member of their party as mayor in 1947. But for one glorious summer day in late August, when the call of the beach starts to fade and the fall campaign season is just ready to start popping, Republicans rule the town. That's the feeling each year at the Billy Meehan Clambake, an open-air festival of cold beer, steamed clams, and brief political speeches at Cannstatter Volksfest-Verein in Northeast Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
May 21, 2012 | Jeff Gelles
No one knows what tomorrow holds. But if biology is destiny, or even a major piece of it, Michael and Linda Dzuba had good reason to ponder a long future as they neared their 60th birthdays. And perhaps reason to worry just a bit. Each of their fathers had lived to nearly 90, and Michael's mother was still going strong in her late 80s. Linda's mother died after giving birth to her, but she was raised largely by an aunt who lived to 102. It wasn't basic finances that worried them.
NEWS
February 26, 2012 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Decades later, the mass killer still poses a mystery. Kevin Riordan, B1.
NEWS
October 28, 1997 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
John Muresan, 89, co-proprietor of the Hawaiian Cottage in Cherry Hill for three decades, died Sunday at Memorial Hospital of Burlington County, Mount Holly. A Burlington Township resident since March, he previously resided in Ocean City for more than two decades. A native of Romania, he immigrated to the United States in 1936. When Mr. Muresan married Mary Pietrafesa Egidi Muresan, she had already been operating the Hawaiian Cottage in Cherry Hill for more than a decade. They jointly operated the South Jersey landmark for another three decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2016 | By Ellen Gray, TELEVISION CRITIC
She won an Oscar at 16 for playing Helen Keller in The Miracle Worker , but for fans of a certain age - and those who caught her 1963-66 show decades later on Nick at Nite - Patty Duke will always be Patty and Cathy Lane. "One pair of matching bookends, different as night and day," they were the "identical cousins" of The Patty Duke Show , their differences reportedly inspired by cocreator Sidney Sheldon's having noticed different sides to the young star's personality. Decades later, she was diagnosed as bipolar.
NEWS
May 12, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
Built during the Depression to make a grand statement, the historic Landis Theater is again at the centerpiece of a plan to rebuild downtown Vineland, N.J. Under a partnership announced Tuesday, the Landis will be the new Cumberland County base for the Bay Atlantic Symphony. Beginning with the 2016-17 season, the orchestra will bring its subscription concert series to the landmark theater. "We think we will bring in some of the most beautiful music in the world," said Paul Herron, executive director of the Bay Atlantic Symphony.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 16, 2016
By Seymour I. "Spence" Toll During summers at our house on the coast of Maine, I occasionally drift into thinking about something thematic in my life, and this summer that turned out to be gratitude. For me, this gratitude has a double life. The first is from my 1925 birth until Dec. 15, 1944. The second is from Dec. 16, 1944, until the current moment of this, my 91st year. That initial span of gratitude is rooted in my ever-loving family of great-hearted parents, an older brother and two younger sisters, and so much of value they contributed to my growth every day of that life.
NEWS
August 16, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
As a Philadelphia firefighter, Steven Mesete often is required to spring into action at a moment's notice, abruptly sending his heart into rat-a-tat mode. "You can be sitting still, and then running at 100 miles an hour," he said. One day last week, Mesete ramped up his cardiovascular system in a much more controlled fashion, walking on a treadmill with wires stuck to his chest and a cardiologist standing nearby. The 41-year-old firefighter with Engine 49 in South Philadelphia was among the first in the 2,200-member department to undergo what is now a mandatory physical exam every two years.
NEWS
July 14, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
A jumble of emotions tugged at Luis Lopez on Tuesday after he was handed keys to a new condominium in Mount Holly Gardens, a neighborhood at the center of a decadelong housing discrimination battle that ended shortly before the U.S. Supreme Court was to hear the case. Lopez and about 40 neighbors, mostly Hispanic and African American, had sued Mount Holly Township after local officials announced plans to demolish the whole neighborhood and redevelop it with market-rate homes the residents could not afford.
NEWS
July 12, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
For 34 years, home for Daniel Peters has been a prison cell. He has been locked up since age 17, with the promise of life in prison. But on June 24, he was released to a halfway house in Philadelphia's Callowhill neighborhood. It was terrifying, but at least he knew just what to expect. He had been given a tour of the facility - using virtual reality goggles. Peters - the first to be released of 295 inmates from Philadelphia sentenced as juveniles to life without parole under a law the Supreme Court has since found unconstitutional - is a test case in an unprecedented reentry challenge for the city.
NEWS
July 6, 2016 | By Erin Serpico, Staff Writer
When Kathleen DeMasi saddled her first horse in 1984 and entered it into a race, her life as a trainer was just beginning. The Maryland native had just gotten her training license. Once the gates opened at Penn National Race Course in Grantville, Pa., the horse, Maryland National, flew by the others and took first place. "I did not think that horse was going to win," said DeMasi, now 53, laughing. "It was pretty exciting. She was a real challenge to get to the races, too. I had to work really hard and think outside of the box. " Now, 8,973 starts and 1,188 wins later, the Mullica Hill resident will be inducted into the Bensalem-based Parx Racing Hall of Fame as an accomplished trainer in September along with four horse-racing colleagues and one horse.
NEWS
June 24, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis and Maria Panaritis, STAFF WRITERS
HARRISBURG - A Senate committee is preparing to strip out the most contentious aspect of a bill that would expand the ability of child sex-abuse victims to sue for decades-old attacks, according to two legislative sources familiar with the move. The Republicans who control the Judiciary Committee could as soon as this week remove the provision that would apply the law retroactively, said the sources, who said they were not authorized to publicly discuss the plan. Hailed by victims' advocates, the language would have opened the door to a wave of lawsuits for child-sex abuse that occurred as far back as the 1970s.
NEWS
June 20, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
In this sour campaign season, where the immigration issue has turned so ugly, it's instructive to watch the European debate over migrants. That debate should make Americans realize how lucky we are. As an immigration country, we have a proven ability to absorb newcomers, including those from Muslim countries. (And we could resolve the problem of illegals from south of the border if both parties cooperated.) Europe, on the other hand, has failed to integrate generations of Muslim guest workers, many of whom still live in ghettos and are preyed on by radical Islamists.
NEWS
June 16, 2016 | By Mensah M. Dean, Staff Writer
Arthur Johnson has used neither a cellphone nor the internet. He's never voted, married, or had children. It was long after the funerals of his father, two brothers, and the grandmother who helped raise him that he even learned of their deaths. For nearly 37 years, he has dined alone. "Beyond the necessary contact with prison staff, I have not touched another human since 1979," Johnson said in a declaration that is part of his federal lawsuit against John Wetzel, the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections secretary, and five other DOC officials.
SPORTS
June 6, 2016 | By Phil Anastasia, STAFF WRITER
On a summer night in 1955, Carmine Calzonetti walked around the corner from his family's home on Washington Terrace in Audubon to the baseball field next to the basketball courts and across the street from the high school. He wanted to see this pitcher from Delaware Township Little League. "I knew his name," Calzonetti said. "He was in the paper all the time for throwing no-hitters. " The pitcher was Billy Hunter. Later that summer, he would lead Delaware Township, which soon would be renamed Cherry Hill, to the first of two consecutive appearances in the Little League World Series in Williamsport, Pa. Flash forward 61 years.
NEWS
May 12, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
Built during the Depression to make a grand statement, the historic Landis Theater is again at the centerpiece of a plan to rebuild downtown Vineland, N.J. Under a partnership announced Tuesday, the Landis will be the new Cumberland County base for the Bay Atlantic Symphony. Beginning with the 2016-17 season, the orchestra will bring its subscription concert series to the landmark theater. "We think we will bring in some of the most beautiful music in the world," said Paul Herron, executive director of the Bay Atlantic Symphony.
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