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FOOD
March 17, 2011
A proper red-eye gravy gets its bold richness in part from a dose of strong black coffee. Shawn Sollberger, chef and co-owner of the new Northern Liberties pub Gunners Run, combines his grandfather's technique for chicken-fried steak with his North Carolina neighbor's red-eye gravy recipe. Instead of adding ham to the gravy, as is the norm, Sollberger crumbles bacon into the oil he uses to pan-fry the top round steak. He deglazes the pan with coffee. It's served with sauteed spinach and black-eyed peas.
NEWS
December 5, 1997 | by Allyson J. Kleiman
When did the men I'm attracted to begin drinking decaf? It seems that only yesterday, these rugged individualists could enjoy a cup of strong coffee - sometimes even two or three - and suffer no ill effects. Now, they're all taking antacids and stacking bricks under the headboard to prevent acid reflux. Last week at my local bagel shop, I spotted a rather dashing man, in his late 40s or early 50s, who glided up to the counter in jeans and work boots and ordered a large coffee. I thought he was a keeper until he sheepishly added in a whisper, "and make that half decaf.
NEWS
November 15, 1989 | By Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
It's happening again. The medical messages are flying fast and furious. First it was oat bran, discredited as a magic bullet against clogged arteries. Now it's decaffeinated coffee - that's right, decaf - accused this week of boosting blood cholesterol. Exercise is good for you. Getting up suddenly in the middle of the night may be bad for you. Shoveling snow may be no worse than other exercise. Take an aspirin every two days (but maybe you don't need it). And welcome to confusion over some of the major medical issues of our lives.
FOOD
March 29, 1989 | By Libby Goldstein, Special to the Daily News
The flavor and aroma of coffee can be as complex and variable as wine - but oh, so much more affordable. The art and technology involved transmuting the "cherries" picked from the tree into a cup of coffee are practically magical. And the world coffee market with its international agreements between producers (mostly in the Third World) and importers (mostly developed nations) is full of foreign intrigue. About half of us drank coffee last year compared to three-quarters in 1962, America's peak coffee drinking year, according to the International Coffee Organization's 1988 Winter Coffee Drinking Study.
NEWS
January 10, 2007 | By Mary Oves
Interoffice memo To: National Football League From: Roger Goodell, commissioner Re: Bringing more women to football Good morning. As you know, in 2006 I was named NFL commissioner. It has been a challenge, taking the reins after my friend and mentor Paul Tagliabue's departure. There have been some tough decisions to make. Which way to face the desk in my office. Whether to offer both decaf espresso and decaf cappuccino in the staff lounge. But something occurred to me the other day after I heard that the 2006 Super Bowl drew 20 million female television viewers ages 18 to 49 - nearly 44 percent of all people in that age group who watched the game.
NEWS
July 2, 2001 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Bow down to Eminem, Dido fans! Were it not for the notorious rapper, the enticing chanteuse who headlined a decaf latte triple bill at the quarter-full Tweeter Center in Camden on Friday would not be the trip-hop singer of choice to American audiences. Last year, the impolite Slim Shady's sampling of the decorous Brit's "Thankyou" on "Stan" led to the release of "Thankyou" as a single. Presto!: Dido's two-year-old No Angel became a three-million-selling hit among the Starbucks set. Thus, the wholesomely soulful vocalist born Florian Cloud De Bounevialle Armstrong - Dido is the mythological queen of Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid - found herself atop a pleasantly lightweight bill that included insubstantial Scottish quartet Travis and Bjork-damaged Icelandic singer Emiliana Torrini.
NEWS
July 26, 2002 | By EILEEN MITCHELL
WORK OUT WITH my personal trainer at 24 Hour Fitness, then stop at Starbucks and pick up a decaf soy venti latte, no foam. Aaahhh, good. Go home, strip off my Nike sweats and shower with Victoria's Secret Raspberry Gel. Throw on my Calvin Klein jeans, Tommy Hilfiger T-shirt and Reeboks, then stroll downdown for a little shopping. Go to the Gap, Casual Corner and 9 West. Looking for something unique. Something different. At Old Navy, find the latest in hip nightwear - flannel bottoms.
NEWS
September 7, 2005
Editor's note: A version of this editorial appeared in an early edition of Monday's Inquirer. Ah, the joy of it all: Sitting in a Starbucks last week, sipping an espresso macchiato and spotting a news story that proclaims that coffee has far more antioxidants than anything else we eat or drink. Antioxidants, of course, are the Patriot missiles of our internal system, seeking out and neutralizing so-called free radicals that can damage cells and hence make us vulnerable to a host of chronic diseases.
FOOD
September 30, 1998 | by Peggy Landers, Daily News Staff Writer
Blue patooties & martinis Congrats to Chef Anthony Arbeeny for his clever potato bar menu at the Park Hyatt Philadelphia at the Bellevue. High atop the hotel in the gorgeous, domed Ethel Barrymore Room on the 19th floor, you can sip martinis and nibble on the most innovative late-night nosh. When? Fridays and Saturdays, from 10 p.m. to 1:30 a.m. What, exactly? Whipped Peruvian blue potatoes, served in martini glasses with your choice of topping - salmon caviar, Tobiko caviar, truffles in oil, smoked salmon, creme fraiche, red onion, chives or tomatoes - for a reasonable $6 per glass.
NEWS
July 8, 1999 | By Chris Satullo, Deputy Editorial Page Editor
What do you call a decaf latte with skim milk? A "Why Bother?" To hear the Sabbath windbags tell it, the Republican presidential primary is the decaf skim latte of political contests. George W. Bush has $36.2 million in his pocket and a pedigree perfecttly suited to the dynastic penchant of the Republican Party. Political analysts swoon before that combination like tweens at an 'N Sync concert. Why bother, indeed, with those tedious primaries? Let George the Younger pass Go, collect another $36 million in donations from public-spirited Americans and head directly to Philadelphia to nibble canapes and pick up his crown.
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NEWS
March 27, 2015
ISSUE | MARKETING A grande win-win After Starbucks Coffee was criticized as being opportunistic for having baristas write race together on coffee cups, the company discontinued the practice ("Starbucks ends cup messages," March 23). But virtually all capitalist enterprise is inherently opportunistic. The green movement in marketing is one example. Companies employing the strategy are at least partly attempting to take advantage of customers' current environmental values to increase sales.
FOOD
March 17, 2011
A proper red-eye gravy gets its bold richness in part from a dose of strong black coffee. Shawn Sollberger, chef and co-owner of the new Northern Liberties pub Gunners Run, combines his grandfather's technique for chicken-fried steak with his North Carolina neighbor's red-eye gravy recipe. Instead of adding ham to the gravy, as is the norm, Sollberger crumbles bacon into the oil he uses to pan-fry the top round steak. He deglazes the pan with coffee. It's served with sauteed spinach and black-eyed peas.
BUSINESS
June 29, 2008 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nine minutes after receptionist Tamara Klopfenstein complained - for the second time - about getting her bosses coffee, she was fired. "I don't expect to serve and wait on you by making and serving you coffee every day," Klopfenstein e-mailed to her boss at National Sales & Supply L.L.C., of Bensalem. Manager Jason Shrager told her the issue wasn't "open for debate. " Instead, the issue caused a brouhaha in federal court. Earlier this month, U.S. District Judge Berle M. Schiller couldn't resist punning his way through a decision on the deeper issue - whether Klopfenstein's managers had created a hostile and discriminatory work environment by requiring the receptionist to fetch them coffee.
NEWS
January 10, 2007 | By Mary Oves
Interoffice memo To: National Football League From: Roger Goodell, commissioner Re: Bringing more women to football Good morning. As you know, in 2006 I was named NFL commissioner. It has been a challenge, taking the reins after my friend and mentor Paul Tagliabue's departure. There have been some tough decisions to make. Which way to face the desk in my office. Whether to offer both decaf espresso and decaf cappuccino in the staff lounge. But something occurred to me the other day after I heard that the 2006 Super Bowl drew 20 million female television viewers ages 18 to 49 - nearly 44 percent of all people in that age group who watched the game.
NEWS
June 26, 2006
The lobbying bill approved last week by House lawmakers is weak. But, in Harrisburg, weak is an improvement. For four years, Pennsylvania has been the only state without any law requiring lobbyists to tell the public how much they spend to influence legislators, or to identify the lawmakers whom they are wooing. The Supreme Court struck down an ethics law in 2002. The Senate approved a bill a year ago. Until this month, the House had resisted the concept that the public had any right to know where special interests were funneling money.
NEWS
January 31, 2006 | By Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At City Coffee, just across the street from Camden City Hall, they are offering a cup of joe, help with tax returns, and - if you really want to know - that pesky DNA paternity test. Owner Ronald Ford Jr. has produced the region's first known marriage of coffee and DNA. In just five workdays, you can find out who's really your daddy. The advertising flyers at his shop picture a cuddly toddler and the question: "Is this your child? . . . Maybe? Do you want to be sure?" Ford said he was in a prime location - a few blocks from Camden's Family Court and across the street from the Camden County Board of Social Services, which processes thousands of child-support payments annually.
NEWS
September 7, 2005
Editor's note: A version of this editorial appeared in an early edition of Monday's Inquirer. Ah, the joy of it all: Sitting in a Starbucks last week, sipping an espresso macchiato and spotting a news story that proclaims that coffee has far more antioxidants than anything else we eat or drink. Antioxidants, of course, are the Patriot missiles of our internal system, seeking out and neutralizing so-called free radicals that can damage cells and hence make us vulnerable to a host of chronic diseases.
NEWS
June 19, 2003 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At last, science may have solved one of the most vexing problems of the modern age: how to make a cup of decaf coffee that tastes good. By altering the genes of the coffee plant, Japanese scientists have found they can reduce the caffeine content by 70 percent, they reported today in the journal Nature. The scientists say it will take a few more years before they have a product ready to market. Currently, coffee beans go through a punishing ordeal to remove their caffeine.
NEWS
July 26, 2002 | By EILEEN MITCHELL
WORK OUT WITH my personal trainer at 24 Hour Fitness, then stop at Starbucks and pick up a decaf soy venti latte, no foam. Aaahhh, good. Go home, strip off my Nike sweats and shower with Victoria's Secret Raspberry Gel. Throw on my Calvin Klein jeans, Tommy Hilfiger T-shirt and Reeboks, then stroll downdown for a little shopping. Go to the Gap, Casual Corner and 9 West. Looking for something unique. Something different. At Old Navy, find the latest in hip nightwear - flannel bottoms.
NEWS
July 2, 2001 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Bow down to Eminem, Dido fans! Were it not for the notorious rapper, the enticing chanteuse who headlined a decaf latte triple bill at the quarter-full Tweeter Center in Camden on Friday would not be the trip-hop singer of choice to American audiences. Last year, the impolite Slim Shady's sampling of the decorous Brit's "Thankyou" on "Stan" led to the release of "Thankyou" as a single. Presto!: Dido's two-year-old No Angel became a three-million-selling hit among the Starbucks set. Thus, the wholesomely soulful vocalist born Florian Cloud De Bounevialle Armstrong - Dido is the mythological queen of Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid - found herself atop a pleasantly lightweight bill that included insubstantial Scottish quartet Travis and Bjork-damaged Icelandic singer Emiliana Torrini.
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