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Decalogue

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1995 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
For years, people who had seen Decalogue - Krzysztof Kieslowski's soul- stirring series inspired by the Ten Commandments, produced for Polish television in 1988 and forever unavailable in the United States - lorded it over the rest of us. They had some special knowledge, they'd touched the Holy Grail, they'd been to Europe. Watching The Double Life of Veronique or Kieslowski's Three Colors - Blue, White and Red, these blessed few would snigger with recognition when a character, a motif, a scene echoed something recalled from the Decalogue.
NEWS
March 8, 2002 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian and Jonathan Gelb INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
One of the women whose federal lawsuit led to Wednesday's ruling ordering that the 1920 plaque listing the Ten Commandments be removed from the Chester County courthouse received two threats yesterday. Margaret Downey, founder and president of the Freethought Society of Greater Philadelphia, who along with atheist Sally Flynn filed the suit, said she received two threats yesterday morning, by phone and e-mail. Downey said the telephone call from a man was laced with obscenities and included the warning: "You're going to get it. " "It was a pretty horrible phone call," said Downey, adding that she retrieved the telephone number from a Caller ID device and reported it to Birmingham Township police.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1995 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
"I'm a pessimist who desperately searches for hope," Krzysztof Kieslowski confessed in an interview a couple of years ago. It's a telling self- appraisal, at once soul-baring and ironic. The Polish filmmaker's work - including 1991's The Double Life of Veronique and his epic 1994 trilogy Three Colors, Blue, White and Red - are artful embodiments of that dark-but-hopeful philosophy, representing a personal but somehow panoramic view of the human condition. With his longtime writing collaborator, Krzysztof Piesiewicz, Kieslowski shows us people in search of love, of spiritual succor, of the goodness in the soul.
NEWS
March 13, 2002 | By David A. Skeel Jr
U.S. District Judge Stewart Dalzell recently ruled that a plaque bearing the Ten Commandments must be removed from the Chester County Courthouse. Soon afterward, I happened to be speaking on a panel entitled "Kieslowski's The Decalogue and its Relevance for American Law" at a law school conference. Krzysztof Kieslowski is a renowned Polish filmmaker, best known in this country for his trilogy, Blue, White and Red. I was speaking on a film series he made based on the Ten Commandments.
NEWS
March 5, 2002 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two Chester County officials yesterday defended keeping a large 82-year-old plaque of the Ten Commandments in place on the courthouse exterior, telling a federal judge the Biblical laws have become so "ubiquitous" in the public mind they no longer have purely religious meaning. "I believe they have a secular purpose and a religious origin," said County Commissioner Colin A. Hanna. And Commissioner Andrew E. Dinniman said that, as a Jew, he was not offended by the church-donated plaque.
NEWS
March 7, 2005
Other guidance Re: "Posting Ten Commandments unlikely to have desired effect," Feb. 27: I cannot understand why columnist Jane Eisner and some other people are so concerned about such postings. Some believe that the display is important for the moral health of the United States. The world population is estimated at 6.129 billion, of which about 2 billion are Christian and Jewish. Thus, approximately 4 billion people do not have the Decalogue per se as part of their religious writings.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1995 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
It came. Philadelphians saw. And, if the fourth annual Festival of World Cinema didn't exactly conquer, its attendance did exceed 20,000 - a robust 25 percent increase over 1994's figure. "Clearly, people have faith in the programming," PFWC director Linda Blackaby said yesterday. "We came down from the mountain with the schedule and asked Philadelphians to go forth and festival. And for 12 days they did. " And on the 12th day, they took their moms. The festival ended its run Sunday with a special Mother's Day offer: "Buy one ticket, Mom gets in free.
NEWS
June 30, 2005 | By Jane Eisner
Every American ought to read a Supreme Court opinion from time to time. I'm not kidding. Read past the citations of obscure case law and the reams of footnotes, and you find a robust, free-wheeling debate on constitutional issues that is not for the faint of heart. The men and women sitting in the highest court in the land may seem imposing, aloof and impossible to decipher, but their opinions can read like verbal wrestling matches (or, when Justice Antonin Scalia is involved, a round of boxing)
LIVING
March 5, 2000 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
We're riding shotgun with Rabbi Shmuley Boteach, wandering Chinatown in his wife's white minivan, his cell phone at his ear, his tallis in a plastic bag on the backseat, his six children's toys clattering behind him with each pothole. Funny, he doesn't look like The Love Rabbi. Oh, but he is. This slight scholar, with a wise bearing and full beard that add decades to his 33 years, says he knows how to find and keep that special someone by following "the Rules. " The ultimate Rules.
NEWS
July 2, 2003 | By Jim Hanak
The 10 Commandments get to stay in the Chester County Courthouse despite the best efforts of Sally Flynn and Margaret Downey, the founder of the Freethought Society of Greater Philadelphia, the atheists' group that filed the lawsuit. Downey said, "We're feeling a little powerless right now. " I am sorry for her distress but, at least for the moment, she knows how most people feel in countries whose governments are based on Downey's antireligious beliefs. This case was not designed to get the government to be "neutral" in its attitude toward religion.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 30, 2005 | By Jane Eisner
Every American ought to read a Supreme Court opinion from time to time. I'm not kidding. Read past the citations of obscure case law and the reams of footnotes, and you find a robust, free-wheeling debate on constitutional issues that is not for the faint of heart. The men and women sitting in the highest court in the land may seem imposing, aloof and impossible to decipher, but their opinions can read like verbal wrestling matches (or, when Justice Antonin Scalia is involved, a round of boxing)
NEWS
June 20, 2005 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Except for the 14 months it spent covered by a sheet of metal - at the order of a federal judge - the bronze plaque listing the Ten Commandments stares from a wall of the Chester County Courthouse in West Chester as it has for the last 85 years. But will it remain so? While a federal appeals court ruled in 2003 that the plaque was historical rather than religious, a ruling expected as early as this week in two Ten Commandments cases before the U.S. Supreme Court might rekindle the Chester County controversy.
NEWS
March 7, 2005
Other guidance Re: "Posting Ten Commandments unlikely to have desired effect," Feb. 27: I cannot understand why columnist Jane Eisner and some other people are so concerned about such postings. Some believe that the display is important for the moral health of the United States. The world population is estimated at 6.129 billion, of which about 2 billion are Christian and Jewish. Thus, approximately 4 billion people do not have the Decalogue per se as part of their religious writings.
NEWS
July 2, 2003 | By Jim Hanak
The 10 Commandments get to stay in the Chester County Courthouse despite the best efforts of Sally Flynn and Margaret Downey, the founder of the Freethought Society of Greater Philadelphia, the atheists' group that filed the lawsuit. Downey said, "We're feeling a little powerless right now. " I am sorry for her distress but, at least for the moment, she knows how most people feel in countries whose governments are based on Downey's antireligious beliefs. This case was not designed to get the government to be "neutral" in its attitude toward religion.
NEWS
March 13, 2002 | By David A. Skeel Jr
U.S. District Judge Stewart Dalzell recently ruled that a plaque bearing the Ten Commandments must be removed from the Chester County Courthouse. Soon afterward, I happened to be speaking on a panel entitled "Kieslowski's The Decalogue and its Relevance for American Law" at a law school conference. Krzysztof Kieslowski is a renowned Polish filmmaker, best known in this country for his trilogy, Blue, White and Red. I was speaking on a film series he made based on the Ten Commandments.
NEWS
March 8, 2002 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian and Jonathan Gelb INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
One of the women whose federal lawsuit led to Wednesday's ruling ordering that the 1920 plaque listing the Ten Commandments be removed from the Chester County courthouse received two threats yesterday. Margaret Downey, founder and president of the Freethought Society of Greater Philadelphia, who along with atheist Sally Flynn filed the suit, said she received two threats yesterday morning, by phone and e-mail. Downey said the telephone call from a man was laced with obscenities and included the warning: "You're going to get it. " "It was a pretty horrible phone call," said Downey, adding that she retrieved the telephone number from a Caller ID device and reported it to Birmingham Township police.
NEWS
March 5, 2002 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two Chester County officials yesterday defended keeping a large 82-year-old plaque of the Ten Commandments in place on the courthouse exterior, telling a federal judge the Biblical laws have become so "ubiquitous" in the public mind they no longer have purely religious meaning. "I believe they have a secular purpose and a religious origin," said County Commissioner Colin A. Hanna. And Commissioner Andrew E. Dinniman said that, as a Jew, he was not offended by the church-donated plaque.
LIVING
March 5, 2000 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
We're riding shotgun with Rabbi Shmuley Boteach, wandering Chinatown in his wife's white minivan, his cell phone at his ear, his tallis in a plastic bag on the backseat, his six children's toys clattering behind him with each pothole. Funny, he doesn't look like The Love Rabbi. Oh, but he is. This slight scholar, with a wise bearing and full beard that add decades to his 33 years, says he knows how to find and keep that special someone by following "the Rules. " The ultimate Rules.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1995 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
It came. Philadelphians saw. And, if the fourth annual Festival of World Cinema didn't exactly conquer, its attendance did exceed 20,000 - a robust 25 percent increase over 1994's figure. "Clearly, people have faith in the programming," PFWC director Linda Blackaby said yesterday. "We came down from the mountain with the schedule and asked Philadelphians to go forth and festival. And for 12 days they did. " And on the 12th day, they took their moms. The festival ended its run Sunday with a special Mother's Day offer: "Buy one ticket, Mom gets in free.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1995 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
"I'm a pessimist who desperately searches for hope," Krzysztof Kieslowski confessed in an interview a couple of years ago. It's a telling self- appraisal, at once soul-baring and ironic. The Polish filmmaker's work - including 1991's The Double Life of Veronique and his epic 1994 trilogy Three Colors, Blue, White and Red - are artful embodiments of that dark-but-hopeful philosophy, representing a personal but somehow panoramic view of the human condition. With his longtime writing collaborator, Krzysztof Piesiewicz, Kieslowski shows us people in search of love, of spiritual succor, of the goodness in the soul.
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