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Decline

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NEWS
May 22, 1986
Having lived in Center City during my medical school and internship years (1974-79), I was sorely disappointed on a recent visit to Philadelphia. What happened to the enthusiastic Bicentennial effort of those years? I was appalled by the amount of uncollected trash, the degree of air pollution and the amount of litter on the streets. I had trouble finding a trash container in Center City, probably part of the last-mentioned problem. Chestnut Street, a beautifully remodeled shopping promenade when I lived in Philadelphia, now has video arcades, gangs with "ghetto blasters" and more litter.
BUSINESS
August 1, 2008 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The economy took a shot at CDI Corp., as the Philadelphia staffing company's second-quarter revenue and earnings dropped. Pulling the numbers down were declines in CDI's subsidiary in the United Kingdom as well as a decline in demand for CDI's contract information-technology workers in the automotive sector. CDI has about 1,400 full-time employees worldwide, about 300 of them in Philadelphia. Including the temps that it contracts out, it has about 12,000 employees worldwide.
SPORTS
September 22, 1987 | By Alex Rosen, Special to The Inquirer
The number of bowlers nationally has been declining recently - down 172,000 this year, according to the American Bowling Congress. And in the Philadelphia area, there also seems to be a slight drop. "We had 16,600 members in 631 leagues last year, but it should be below that (this year)," said Betty Davoli, secretary of the Greater Philadelphia Women's Association. Davoli said the reason for the decline in women's membership seems clear. "There's been a drop in daytime bowling due to the fact that many more women are working now," she said.
NEWS
June 14, 1986 | By Edwin M. Yoder Jr
Because presidential news conferences are meant to be informative and are potential forums of accountability, their decline in the Reagan years is a saddening spectacle. This was never more clearly illustrated than by the President's performance Wednesday, at his 37th such gathering. Are these affairs taken seriously out in television land? The impression of their importance is perhaps fed by the imperial air with which Reagan strides down that long red carpet to face the waiting reporters.
NEWS
June 8, 2005 | By David Brooks
Forgive me for making a blunt and obvious point, but events in Western Europe are slowly discrediting large swaths of American liberalism. Most of the policy ideas advocated by American liberals have already been enacted in Europe: generous welfare measures, ample labor protections, highly progressive tax rates, single-payer health-care systems, zoning restrictions to limit big retailers, and cradle-to-grave middle-class subsidies supporting everything...
NEWS
February 1, 1989 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
A decline in the number of high school graduates brought about by falling birth rates has dampened applications at many of the most prestigious colleges and universities in the Philadelphia area. The decline in applications, which had been predicted for years but not realized until now, follows two years of record-high numbers of applications received at many schools. At the University of Pennsylvania, which has been on the rise as a "hot" school in the Ivy League, officials expect about 11,500 applications for next fall's freshman class, down 11.5 percent from the 13,000 applications received last fall.
NEWS
May 23, 2011 | Associated Press
HARRISBURG - The number of malpractice lawsuits filed against doctors and hospitals in Pennsylvania dropped last year for the sixth year in a row. The total was 1,491, according to a report last week by the Administrative Office of Pennsylvania Courts - about half the peak of 2,904 in 2002. Court officials reported that 163 cases last year had reached a jury, and that 133 verdicts - 82 percent - had favored the defense. The decline has followed legal changes that the state made to weed out frivolous cases.
NEWS
February 27, 2013 | By Robert Burns, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The American-led military coalition in Afghanistan backed off Tuesday from its claim that Taliban attacks dropped off in 2012, tacitly acknowledging a hole in its widely repeated argument that violence was easing and that the insurgency was in steep decline. In response to Associated Press inquiries about its latest statistics on security in Afghanistan, the coalition command in Kabul said it had erred in reporting a 7 percent decline in attacks. In fact, there was no decline at all, officials said.
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NEWS
May 29, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsauken Township's Police Department will not be replaced with a Camden County-run force, the township's public safety director said Wednesday, ending weeks of uncertainty among officers and other residents about the future of policing there. "We have unanimously decided that Pennsauken police stays right where they are," Public Safety Director John Kneib said at a Township Committee meeting, where a crowd of more than 150 people - mostly officers and their families - erupted into applause and cheers, with some yelling, "Thank you!"
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
For more than a century, medical education in the United States has meant learning how to practice medicine and how to do research to make medicine better. But that could be changing. Given the need for more primary-care physicians, the shortage of certain specialists, and the belief that medical schools boost local economies, 36 institutions have opened across the country in the last 20 years. That growth "has been accompanied by a shift toward new medical-education models where research plays a minimal role," according to a paper published recently in Science Translational Medicine.
NEWS
April 29, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Christie, whose approval ratings in New Jersey have hit new lows as he eyes a run for president, said Monday a media battering was partly responsible for the declines. Appearing on NJ101.5 radio's Ask the Governor program, Christie said he was unconcerned about his approval ratings, which have sunk to the 30s in some polls, declines that began after the George Washington Bridge lane-closure scandal broke in January 2014. "If you're going to have relentlessly negative coverage from the media, it's going to affect your poll numbers," Christie said.
NEWS
April 2, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Pat Toomey isn't named in the latest Quinnipiac Poll, but Pennsylvania's Republican senator probably likes it anyway. The poll, out Tuesday, showed Hillary Rodham Clinton's numbers sinking in Pennsylvania - a trend that could affect Toomey's 2016 reelection bid. The poll showed a sharp drop in Pennsylvanians' approval of Clinton, the Democrats' presidential front-runner in waiting. Her favorability stood at 48-47, according to the poll, down from 55-38 on Feb. 3. And her lead in the commonwealth has narrowed in head-to-head matchups against Republican hopefuls like Jeb Bush and Chris Christie.
NEWS
March 27, 2015
RE: VALERIE RUSS' "Billboards are a blight to her": I live near Rittenhouse Square, but I consider all of Center City my neighborhood. One of the major reasons I chose to move to Philadelphia back in 1980 was because I was so impressed by some of its outstanding architectural and historical attributes, attributes that I still appreciate on a daily basis as I walk our downtown streets. Thus, I am absolutely appalled by these proposals to erect garish, invasive LED billboards at key locations in the heart of our city.
NEWS
March 6, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Gloria Burns declined Wednesday to approve, at least for a week, the third attempt to sell Revel, the bankrupt, closed albatross of a casino hotel - this one the second try with Florida developer Glenn Straub, for $82 million. The delay allows a small window for eleventh-hour interest, notably from Los Angeles developer Izek Shomof, who flew into Atlantic City this week to make his own bid of $80 million. Burns said she was putting off approval to allow consideration of other offers.
SPORTS
March 2, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
When I think of bowling, and I rarely do anymore, it's as a curious relic, like 45-r.p.m. records or paperboys. Odd as it now sounds, bowling was once a vital strand of society's connective tissue, an American activity nearly as commonplace as churchgoing. Far more accessible and affordable than golf or tennis, it was the people's sport. Its state-of-the-art bowling centers became country clubs for the middle class, its weekly leagues social melting pots. What 1950s home was without a bowling bag or two in the closet or a rec-room shelf where bowling trophies were displayed?
NEWS
February 7, 2015 | By Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Republicans, in search of a brand-name candidate for the Philadelphia mayor's race, reached out to a recently retired heavy hitter: Ronald D. Castille. The 70-year-old, who stepped down as chief justice of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court just 37 days ago, was heavily recruited for the race by top city and state GOP leaders. He turned them down. Rob Gleason, chairman of the Pennsylvania Republican Party, said he commissioned a poll that showed Castille could have gotten right back into the game.
BUSINESS
January 4, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
American Airlines and merger partner US Airways could enjoy more than $2.5 billion in "tailwinds" in 2015 because Philadelphia's dominant airline does not hedge its jet-fuel costs and does not have profit-sharing with employees, a Wall Street analyst said Friday. American is one of the few major airlines that does not buy hedges, which are futures contracts that lock in fuel prices in advance. Declining oil prices should be worth at least $1.3 billion to American, airline analyst Hunter Keay of Wolfe Research L.L.C.
NEWS
December 17, 2014 | By Craig R. McCoy and Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writers
Police gunfire ending in death is sharply down in Philadelphia, a trend that follows department efforts to reduce the use of lethal force, police reports show. So far in 2014, police officers have shot and killed four people. By the same date last year, they had killed 12. And in 2012 by this date, officers had killed 16. From 2010 through 2014, one Philadelphia police officer - Moses Walker Jr. - was shot and killed. But Walker, who was shot in 2012 after completing his shift, was not in uniform.
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