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Decline

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NEWS
May 22, 1986
Having lived in Center City during my medical school and internship years (1974-79), I was sorely disappointed on a recent visit to Philadelphia. What happened to the enthusiastic Bicentennial effort of those years? I was appalled by the amount of uncollected trash, the degree of air pollution and the amount of litter on the streets. I had trouble finding a trash container in Center City, probably part of the last-mentioned problem. Chestnut Street, a beautifully remodeled shopping promenade when I lived in Philadelphia, now has video arcades, gangs with "ghetto blasters" and more litter.
SPORTS
September 22, 1987 | By Alex Rosen, Special to The Inquirer
The number of bowlers nationally has been declining recently - down 172,000 this year, according to the American Bowling Congress. And in the Philadelphia area, there also seems to be a slight drop. "We had 16,600 members in 631 leagues last year, but it should be below that (this year)," said Betty Davoli, secretary of the Greater Philadelphia Women's Association. Davoli said the reason for the decline in women's membership seems clear. "There's been a drop in daytime bowling due to the fact that many more women are working now," she said.
BUSINESS
August 1, 2008 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The economy took a shot at CDI Corp., as the Philadelphia staffing company's second-quarter revenue and earnings dropped. Pulling the numbers down were declines in CDI's subsidiary in the United Kingdom as well as a decline in demand for CDI's contract information-technology workers in the automotive sector. CDI has about 1,400 full-time employees worldwide, about 300 of them in Philadelphia. Including the temps that it contracts out, it has about 12,000 employees worldwide.
NEWS
June 14, 1986 | By Edwin M. Yoder Jr
Because presidential news conferences are meant to be informative and are potential forums of accountability, their decline in the Reagan years is a saddening spectacle. This was never more clearly illustrated than by the President's performance Wednesday, at his 37th such gathering. Are these affairs taken seriously out in television land? The impression of their importance is perhaps fed by the imperial air with which Reagan strides down that long red carpet to face the waiting reporters.
NEWS
June 8, 2005 | By David Brooks
Forgive me for making a blunt and obvious point, but events in Western Europe are slowly discrediting large swaths of American liberalism. Most of the policy ideas advocated by American liberals have already been enacted in Europe: generous welfare measures, ample labor protections, highly progressive tax rates, single-payer health-care systems, zoning restrictions to limit big retailers, and cradle-to-grave middle-class subsidies supporting everything...
NEWS
February 1, 1989 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
A decline in the number of high school graduates brought about by falling birth rates has dampened applications at many of the most prestigious colleges and universities in the Philadelphia area. The decline in applications, which had been predicted for years but not realized until now, follows two years of record-high numbers of applications received at many schools. At the University of Pennsylvania, which has been on the rise as a "hot" school in the Ivy League, officials expect about 11,500 applications for next fall's freshman class, down 11.5 percent from the 13,000 applications received last fall.
NEWS
May 23, 2011 | Associated Press
HARRISBURG - The number of malpractice lawsuits filed against doctors and hospitals in Pennsylvania dropped last year for the sixth year in a row. The total was 1,491, according to a report last week by the Administrative Office of Pennsylvania Courts - about half the peak of 2,904 in 2002. Court officials reported that 163 cases last year had reached a jury, and that 133 verdicts - 82 percent - had favored the defense. The decline has followed legal changes that the state made to weed out frivolous cases.
NEWS
February 29, 1988 | By BEN YAGODA, Daily News Movie Critic
"A Night in the Life of Jimmy Reardon" is a singularly unlikable movie most notable for the further decline it marks in the career of its director, William Richert. Richert made an impressive debut in 1979 with "Winter Kills," an energetically paranoid and mordantly funny take on the Kennedy assassination that never managed to find its audience. His next movie was originally released as "The American Success Company," rereleased as "American Success" and released yet again as "Success.
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NEWS
August 14, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal and Craig R. McCoy, STAFF WRITERS
Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane chose not to testify at her perjury trial Friday, and her lawyers rested their case without presenting any evidence or witnesses. A Montgomery County Court jury is to begin deliberating Kane's fate Monday after hearing closing arguments from both sides. "I don't believe it's necessary for me to testify on my own behalf," Kane told Judge Wendy Demchick-Alloy. The abrupt end to the witness stage of the trial came after prosecutors presented the last of their 14 witnesses over four days.
NEWS
July 10, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Culture Writer
The Philadelphia Historical Commission declined Friday to place the ground beneath a pair of Frankford Avenue garages on the Philadelphia Register of Historic Places. The unusual application for historic designation asserted that the Mutual Burial Ground of Kensington, an old graveyard actively used from the 1820s to the late 1860s, lay partially beneath 1834-48 Frankford Avenue - the location where developer Ori Feibush plans to knock down garages that stand there and build about 41 residential units.
NEWS
May 16, 2016 | By Stu Bykofsky
YOU WILL FIND this hard to believe. Despite the rhapsody of glowing media about bicycling, including reports of never-ending increases in the nation's most bike-happy city (that's us), bicycle commuting actually has declined. I was shocked when I learned this, because I thought we were Amsterdam without canals. Commuters biking to work was a puny 1.9 percent in 2015, the same as 2014, down from the high-water mark of 2.3 percent in 2013. I remember in 2010, the city set a goal - maybe "made a wish" is more accurate - of 5 percent bike commuters by 2020.
NEWS
April 1, 2016 | By Jeff Gammage, STAFF WRITER
All that remains for Daniel Dougherty are the lawyers' closing arguments and the decision of the jury. After that, he'll either be set free after 16 years, or returned to prison, condemned again for the 1985 arson murder of his two young sons. Dougherty, 56, told the judge on Wednesday that he would not testify in his own defense. He said he did not know if he had ever been diagnosed with a mental illness, but had sought treatment after the deaths of 3-year-old John and 4-year-old Daniel Jr. Questioned by Common Pleas Court Judge J. Scott O'Keefe, Dougherty said he understood all that occurred during his trial.
SPORTS
February 25, 2016 | By David Murphy, Daily News Columnist
CLEARWATER, Fla. - In order for Ryan Howard and the Phillies to make it through 2016 with anything close to a functional relationship, the first baseman will need to be more honest with himself than he was with the media on Tuesday afternoon. That's not an impossibility, even after a news conference in which the onetime superstar sounded incredulous that somebody might harbor doubts about his role with the club moving forward. Even back when he was hitting 50 home runs per season as one of the most productive cleanup men in the game, Howard's sensitivity to criticism sometimes led him to react to questions in a way that suggested he was living in a different reality from the rest of the world.
NEWS
February 18, 2016
THE PHILADELPHIA Police Department has all but quit enforcing traffic laws on Philadelphia streets. That's an exaggeration, but the number of tickets written to motorists, bicyclists, and pedestrians all took a nosedive in 2015. It was the third straight year of decline for motorists, the second for bicyclists, and the first for pedestrians. Enforcement is as low as a snail's belly. This year, I'm adding tickets written for skateboarding. Two were written in 2013, 14 in 2014, and a lonely one in 2015.
BUSINESS
February 1, 2016
The stock market slide has been dizzying. Since the start of the year, stock prices have plunged by more than 10 percent, their worst start to any year on record. There is increasingly ominous talk among investors that the troubled stock market is signaling, or may even precipitate, a recession. Ignore the talk. While the stock market decline is disconcerting to watch, as the late economics Nobel laureate Paul Samuelson once quipped, "Wall Street indexes predicted nine out of the last five recessions.
SPORTS
January 11, 2016 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, STAFF WRITER
The world was much wider in 1960. And because 90-second casts and parochial newspapers offered few glimpses beyond our hometown and home state, we were bound more tightly to both locales. Back then I was certain Philadelphia was the world's sports capital. I proudly pointed out the fact that three fellow Pennsylvanians - Wilt Chamberlain, Johnny Unitas, and Arnold Palmer - ruled their respective games. And, in baseball, Stan Musial wasn't far behind. Pennsylvania's sports stars were as tough, gritty, and abundant as the state's other great resources - steel and coal - the production of which was likely to have employed these athletes' fathers.
NEWS
December 23, 2015 | BY WILL BUNCH, Staff Writer
THEY CALLED themselves "the Goon Squad" - a kind of A-Team of strong, burly African-American men who drove the streets of Wilmington's predominantly black neighborhoods in the late 1960s looking for early signs of gang violence and telling young people to keep it cool. Herman Holloway Jr., a veteran community activist in the Delaware city who helped organize the Goon Squad when he was in his early 20s, recalls that the team included a former Navy heavyweight boxing champ and a man who moved broken-down cars with his bare hands.
NEWS
November 22, 2015 | By Matthew Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bucks County Democrats announced Friday that they would not call for a recount of November election returns that left their candidate 733 votes shy of capturing a seat that would have given them a majority on the Board of Commissioners for the first time in over three decades. "This decision was not made lightly, and was arrived at after serious deliberation with our candidates and party officials. But from the beginning, we wanted to make sure every vote was properly accounted for," party Chairman John Cordisco said in a statement.
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