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Deep Blue

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NEWS
February 16, 1996 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Crazy Bird. That's what grade school kids called Feng-Hsiung Hsu, whose tousled hair made him look like a woodpecker. It's also what many computer and chess experts wanted to call him when he predicted in the late 1980s that a computer would beat the world's best chess player within a few years. Now, Hsu (pronounced Shoo); his longtime partner, Murray Campbell; and a team of about 200 IBM scientists running the supercomputer Deep Blue are standing on the threshold of history, the point in time when a computer has seriously challenged, and may beat, the world's reigning chess champion, Garry Kasparov.
NEWS
February 13, 1996 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Deep Blue ate some humble pie on Sunday. And its handlers tried to lower expectations yesterday. As the team of IBM computer scientists were "adjusting parameters" and "tightening algorithms" in the code that runs Big Blue - making ready for today's third chess game against Garry Kasparov - the team's leader sounded a cautionary note. Even if Deep Blue gets skunked from now on, said Chung-Jen Tan, "I'm very happy we won one game. " Already, he said, "we've made history. " Kasparov - the world's top-ranked chess player - has rattled the IBM team and gained, at least at the moment, an upperhand in the six-game, Rocky-style chess match unfolding in Center City this week.
NEWS
October 22, 1997 | By Anthony Beckman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For Deep Blue developer C.J. Tan, today's man-versus-machine competition is reminiscent of the early 1900s, when crowds watched races that pitted humans against that era's newest technology, the automobile and its internal combustion engine. "But soon they realized the automobile is faster," said Tan, a developer of IBM's computer chess program that beat world champion Garry Kasparov earlier this year. "Soon, they're so far behind that it's not an interesting race anymore. " Speaking to about 200 people at the University of Delaware yesterday, Tan explained how International Business Machines Corp.
NEWS
May 14, 1997 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In playing chess against the computer named Deep Blue, world champion Garry Kasparov said he could feel the stirrings of intelligence inside the ominous black monoliths that hold the silicon guts of his machine opponent. But was it really intelligence that Kasparov sensed in the computer that flustered and frustrated him last weekend? Does Deep Blue possess that elusive human quality of insight? Or was it just the numbing calculating power of a collection of speedy circuits that mindlessly carry out a mechanical set of instructions?
LIVING
February 4, 1996 | By William R. Macklin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On that old doo-dah day when a cold, emotionless computer finally wrests the world chess championship from the warm, feeling hands of a human being, Chung-Jen Tan won't rejoice. But he's sure gonna smile. Tan leads the team that developed Deep Blue, the IBM supercomputer that will take on world chess champion Garry Kasparov in a six-game, six-day match at the Convention Center starting Saturday. There's $500,000 in prize money at stake, and Tan, who believes that a computer capable of beating all human opponents is an inevitability, says his machine is set to test the Russian champion.
NEWS
February 18, 1996 | By William R. Macklin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It is the first law for smart machines: Do no harm to humans. Someone apparently forgot to tell that to Deep Blue, the IBM supercomputer that drew first blood last week in its six-game match against world chess champion Garry Kasparov. The fear and loathing that followed the grand master's shocking first-round defeat was so thick you could slice it with a razor of silicon. This, it seems, is the dark cloud behind the silver lining of modern technological advancement: Our machines have become smart enough to beat us at our own game.
NEWS
February 18, 1996 | By William R. Macklin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
World chess champion Garry Kasparov triumphed over the IBM supercomputer Deep Blue yesterday, easily defeating the swift-thinking machine to win the final round of their historic man-vs.-machine face-off and walk away with $400,000 in prize money. Kasparov, who had described the computer as "a monster" and said it was his duty to preserve humanity's dominance over the machine, forced his cybernetic opponent to resign after the 43d move. Kasparov, the world's highest-rated chess player, called the match "the most important event of my career.
NEWS
February 11, 1996 | By William R. Macklin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Reuters also contributed to this story
The computer won. And it made chess history while doing it. On the 37th move of their first game together, Garry Kasparov, the world's top-ranked chess player, yesterday conceded defeat to the IBM chess computer, Deep Blue. The man many consider the strongest player in the history of the game had been under pressure as early as the 13th move, when he took 27 minutes to reply to Deep Blue's knight attacking his queen. Kasparov was visibly agitated in the final minutes of the game, the first of a six-game match at the Convention Center.
LIVING
February 6, 1996 | By William R. Macklin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Garry Kasparov vs. The Computer. This time it's personal. Kasparov, world chess champion, highest-rated player of all time, the intense, calm-as-spring Russian grandmaster, says he has no intention of letting Deep Blue, the latest chess-playing supercomputer, leave Philadelphia with $400,000 in prize money. If he has to take the thing apart, bolt by bolt - to virtually get inside the computer's "personality" - Kasparov intends to figure out how to beat the new IBM machine, and emerge the winner when his unprecedented six-game match against Deep Blue concludes Feb. 17 at the Convention Center.
NEWS
February 14, 1996 | By William R. Macklin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Deep Blue, the IBM supercomputer that faced world chess champion Garry Kasparov yesterday in the third round of their six-game match, is beginning to look like the data-age version of the Little Engine That Could. At the Convention Center yesterday, the silicon-chip challenger frustrated Kasparov's early advantage, battling the highest-rated player in the history of the game to a draw on the 39th move. The match now stands at 1 1/2 games each. As he strolled from the dimly lit chamber where he had played the three-hour game, Kasparov, who played black, said that had his opponent been human, "I would have won. " He suggested that the computer, which has no concept of a draw and relies on its operators to say when a game cannot be won, had been unusually strong on the defense despite a weak opening strategy.
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NEWS
February 17, 2011 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Columnist
Its human contestants shook their heads in awe as an IBM computer demonstrated Wednesday night for the first time that humans can program a machine to analyze and understand the trickiest vagaries of natural language. And also play a pretty mean game of Jeopardy! With a two-game total of $77,147, a computer called Watson dominated the two former giants of the quiz show, 74-game winner Ken Jennings and all-time money champ ($3.2 million) Brad Rutter, more than tripling Jennings' second-place total of $24,000.
SPORTS
December 13, 2010 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Staff Writer
ARLINGTON, Texas - DeSean Jackson spent the last week playfully debating Jeremy Maclin and LeSean McCoy over who is the fastest Eagle. That question remains unresolved, but Jackson at least showed he is faster than anyone on the Dallas Cowboys' defense. All the evidence needed came on Jackson's scintillating 91-yard fourth quarter touchdown Sunday night, punctuated by a stylish - but penalized - celebration that put his team ahead and swung a game that was in danger of slipping away from the Eagles.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2010 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, staff
Bands to believe in, another blue-eyed soulster "gone Memphis," plus sumptuous music from south of the border, Ireland and Jamaica have captured our ears in this week's new album offerings. Offering further proof of their might - this Montreal-based alt-rock troupe filled the shed at the Mann Center for the Performing Arts last night and will play "the big room" in New York City, Madison Square Garden, tomorrow and Thursday. Arcade Fire is the stuff that legends could be made of, a new band to believe in, in the vein of U2. Led by front man Win Butler with songwriting/vocal assists by wife Regine Chassagne, these are sensitive souls with sonic ambition.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2009 | By Nicole Pensiero FOR THE INQUIRER
Blues-rocker Davy Knowles, born on the Isle of Man, admits the last two years have been "something of a blur. " The 22-year-old guitar wunderkind split from his original Back Door Slam band mates, took up with a new group of musicians, recorded an album with childhood hero Peter Frampton at the helm, and shared the stage with two of his biggest musical inspirations (Jeff Beck and Gov't Mule's Warren Haynes). But perhaps the most exhilarating moment came when someone forwarded Knowles a video of some Isle of Man schoolchildren singing his song "Roll Away" to Bee Gees Barry and Robin Gibb, who visited their birthplace last summer.
FOOD
November 15, 2007 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
Hard to believe that Dave Magrogan has been in the restaurant business only 41/2 years. Magrogan, a chiropractor by training, built six Kildare's pubs. He branched out last year with a different concept, Doc Magrogan's Oyster House in downtown West Chester. His latest project - for which he ventured out into the hinterlands (near Chester County's border with Lancaster, at Routes 322 and 10) - is Grady David's (4690 Horseshoe Pike, Honey Brook, 610-273-9000). Grady David's, named after his baby son, is a spacious operation (main dining room, bar, raw bar, downstairs game room, lounge)
NEWS
December 18, 2005 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of miles from any land, the waters of the North Atlantic suddenly developed an oddly deep-blue hue and turned incongruously warm. Patches of peculiar brown seaweed rode the surface, and the ocean brewed mild, damp winds that the muscular 20-year-old could feel on his skin. To the sailor, Benjamin Franklin, it was a puzzle, one that would baffle and bedevil him for decades. It would take him 40 years to figure out what he had encountered back in 1726. He had crossed a moving, meandering mass of warm water, 300 times stronger than the flow of all the rivers emptying into the Atlantic Ocean.
NEWS
November 24, 2003 | By Charles Krauthammer
Scoff if you will, but I stayed home Tuesday to watch a chess game. I don't get ESPN in my office, and I was not about to miss the tiebreaking final game of the man vs. machine epic: the best humanity has to offer, Garry Kasparov, versus the best in silicon, X3D Fritz. To most folks, all of this man vs. computer stuff is anti-climax. After all, the barrier was broken in 1997 when man was beaten, Kasparov succumbing to Deep Blue in a match that was truly frightening. Frightening not so much because the computer won, but because of how it won, making at some point moves of subtlety.
NEWS
February 18, 2001
A CHANCE FOR QUIET AND INTROSPECTION Winter is not my favorite season, although shorter, darker days do not lead me to depression and driving in snow rarely infuses me with fear. Yes, I cringe when cold weather invades my body like a virus and I shudder at the thought of even one snowflake sticking to the driveway or sidewalk. And just when I've successfully circumvented the morning commute without incident, envisioning clear sailing for the evening rush, the heavens suddenly release a wintry wonderland of white.
NEWS
November 15, 1999 | By William Lamb, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Anton Kovalsky sat hunched yesterday over a chessboard, resting his chin on his left palm as the fingers of his right hand danced around the crown of his queen. The final seconds of his match with Sam Weissman ticked away on a clock to his left. "Checkmate," Anton, 13, said as he positioned his white monarch a square from Sam's king. Sam, 12, responded by tipping over his king in resigned defeat. The pair were among 86 chess enthusiasts, ages 5 to 18, competing in the first Philadelphia Scholastic Chess Championship at the Kaiserman Jewish Community Center here.
NEWS
October 31, 1999 | By Suzanne Gordon, FOR THE INQUIRER
If you're about to send any children off to college, let me make a suggestion. Start lobbying for careers in hotel-restaurant management. Then, once they reach graduation, start talking enthusiastically about seeing the world while they're still young, and, if you play your cards right, you might end up as lucky as me. As a young graduate, my daughter moved here to a remote, nearly deserted island in the Turks and Caicos Islands, one of...
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