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Deep Freeze

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NEWS
January 19, 1994 | by Scott Flander and Paul Maryniak Daily News Staff Writers Staff writer Bob Warner contributed to this report
This isn't cold. This is whatever is beyond cold. Early this morning, while you were sleeping, it was about 4 degrees below zero in the city. The wind chill was minus-34. OK, maybe that's nothing to people who live in places like Minnesota or Canada. But in Philadelphia, where an Eskimo Pie is just an ice cream bar, this kind of cold is about as welcome as a Giants fan at the Vet. Yesterday, as the temperature dropped like crazy, car locks and roads and just about everthing else froze up. Morning rush hour was bad. Afternoon rush hour was bad. Here's what it looked like in the city, according to Accu-Weather: 2 a.m. - 33 degrees.
SPORTS
May 10, 1991 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
Michael Jordan is hurtling through the air, his tongue hanging out, the basketball gripped in his right hand, cocked at a frightening 45-degree angle. Something athletic, acrobatic, indescribably amazing is about to happen. Something else is about to happen, a phenomenon 76ers coach Jim Lynam refers to as mental paralysis. That's when the guy guarding Jordan, or the guy designated to give help, finds himself caught, helpless, in a freeze frame. Should he take a foul?
NEWS
December 20, 1988 | By Chris Morkides, Special to The Inquirer
Vince Clarke wanted his Marple Newtown players to be Tigers against Lower Merion's zone defense in the first half of their Central League clash Friday night. Instead, they were pussycats en route to a 66-59 loss to the previously winless Aces. The host Tigers didn't drive against Lower Merion's zones. They didn't move well, they didn't shoot well, they didn't do anything well enough to prevent Clarke from reading the riot act to his squad at the half. "In the locker room, I told them to attack the zone, to penetrate, to make somebody play them," Clarke said after the Tigers fell behind 40-32 at the half.
NEWS
December 15, 1986 | By RANDY DIAMOND and PAUL La ROSA, New York Daily News
The New Jersey priest who told a group of first-graders that Santa Claus is dead has been shipped to the North Pole. The Rev. Romano Ferraro, a.k.a. Scrooge, has taken an indefinite leave, the Rev. Francis Sergel, pastor of St. John Vianney Church in Colonia, told parishioners at yesterday's masses. Sergel, who would not say where Ferraro had gone, apologized to parishioners for the priest's statements and said he was sorry that "a prayerful time . . . has turned into a time of anguish, confusion, disappointment and even anger for many of you. " Ferraro made headlines last week when he told a religious instruction class of children that Santa Claus was a made-up figure and that the historical St. Nicholas is long dead.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2008 | By Kristin Granero FOR THE INQUIRER
At the Camden Adventure Aquarium, families can learn during the third annual Deep Freeze celebration about animals that live in cold climates year round. The Deep Freeze will entertain guests this weekend with seal and penguin feedings, sculpting of a 300-pound ice block, and free Turkey Hill ice cream samples from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. There will be a Coke Polar Bear Moon Bounce and the Polar Express 4D Experience in the 4D Theater. Children can warm up by participating in special activities Saturday and Sunday.
NEWS
January 23, 1994 | By MARTA McCAVE
The ice and snow and frigid temperatures always bring out many acts of heroism, and the past few weeks' weather is no exception. Road crews, emergency workers and utility crews have all labored valiantly at their jobs. Even my milkman hasn't missed a delivery. But among the most unsung heroes have been the parents stuck at home with small children. And I should know - I'm one of them. My son's kindergarten has now had at least seven snow days since January. He may need to repeat the year if the bad weather persists.
NEWS
January 4, 1988 | By RAMONA SMITH, Daily News Staff Writer
If there's slush out there, shovel it. That's the word from the weatherman, who says tonight's deep freeze could cause more problems than the 3-inch snowfall that the city easily brushed off during this morning's rush-hour commute. "People should be doing their shoveling this afternoon and this evening," said AccuWeather meteorologist Elliot Abrams, "because anything that melts and refreezes will be turning to boiler plate on sidewalks and driveways tonight. " The city reported that 551 people were either picked up off the streets or turned up at homeless shelters as the snow drifted down onto the city last night.
NEWS
December 13, 1988 | By Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
The Llamas were cavorting coatless in their outdoor pens at the Philadelphia Zoo yesterday morning, despite the record cold. George, the big male Siberian tiger, was pacing about in the open too, "having a grand time," said Zoo president Bill Donaldson. The temperature dropped to 8 degrees here early yesterday, snapping the record of 9 set in 1977. But even if it had approached the city's all-time low of 11 below zero, that wouldn't have fazed George, Donaldson said. Although George was born at a zoo in Minnesota, the big cat's breed hails from the Amur River region of Siberia.
NEWS
December 16, 1997 | Daily News wire services
SHARJAH 85 die in plane crash in United Arab Emirates A charter flight from Tajikistan crashed into desert sand yesterday near an airport in the United Arab Emirates, killing 85 people. One person survived. An explosion rocked the plane as it started to land, said Rustam Rustamov, vice president of the air charter company. But Emirates officials said they had no report of a blast. The Tu-154 was en route from Tajikistan to Sharjah in the United Arab Emirates, the state-run Emirates News Agency reported.
NEWS
March 14, 1993 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
CUPID SHOOTS BACK AT VALENTINE GIFT-GIVERS Good morning. Know what day this is? Well, in Japan it's "White Day. " That's the day on which women can expect to receive lavishly wrapped gifts of white chocolate, handkerchiefs or panties. In Japan, where women alone lavish chocolates and other presents on their sweethearts and colleagues on Valentine's Day, White Day is kind of a reciprocal holiday. On this day, men repay the objects of their affections. One woman who has worked in an office for 14 years estimates that her White Day handkerchief collection now exceeds 80. For 1993, one color-blind manufacturer offers hot pink panties with the slogan "Intellectual Sexy Elegance.
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NEWS
January 5, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Jacqueline L. Urgo, and Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writers
In Center City, blowing snow and 18-degree temperatures didn't stop 70 devoted Eagles fans from picking their way across frozen sidewalks to cheer at a midday pep rally. In Camden County, officials pleaded with drivers to stay off dangerously icy roads, as schools closed across New Jersey. In the Pennsylvania suburbs, commerce would not be stopped by harsh weather - the Plymouth Meeting, Willow Grove Park, Exton Square and Springfield malls all managed to open by about noon Friday.
NEWS
January 25, 2013 | By Peter Mucha, Breaking News Desk
Tonight could edge last night for the season's coldest temperatures yet, and snow is likely to begin accumulating Friday afternoon, amounting to a couple of inches throughout the area by Saturday morning. In Philadelphia, there's a chance of snow by 1 p.m. that becomes likely by 4 p.m., possibly making for hazardous home commutes. Up to three inches could fall Friday night, with temperatures remaining well below freezing, making shoveling - and sledding - a possibility Saturday morning throughout Eastern Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware, according to the National Weather Service.
NEWS
January 8, 2013 | By Peter Mucha, Breaking News Desk
No snow is in the 10-day forecast, but there could be some rain, as the region is beginning a stretch of warmer days. Enjoy it while it lasts. AccuWeather warns that in a week or two "brutal cold waves" could be forced down from arctic regions. That could even mean "a series of storms" as the cold moves toward the south and east, according to meteorologist Jack Boston. Although high pressure off the Atlantic coast may ward off the worst for a while, "most of the time in situations like this, cold air finishes the job and reaches the Atlantic Seaboard," says meteorologist Joe Lundberg.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2010
DEAR ABBY: My boyfriend and I have been dating for a year. When we got together he had just gotten out of a five-year relationship. He says he loves me, but he recently told me that she was better in bed than I am! I have lost confidence in our relationship and don't enjoy making love with him now, knowing I don't measure up. His ex was better-looking than I am, but I don't understand why he would say that. I have told him he hurt my feelings, but he doesn't care. What do I do now?
NEWS
February 16, 2010 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The wintry pattern has been about as stubborn as a patch of compacted ice, and government and private forecasters are looking for it to persist into March. While that outlook may not be warmly welcomed, weather experts say it is having at least one benign side effect: It is a putting damper on the flooding threat by holding the melting to a glacial pace. "I can't see a meltdown coming," said Fred House, a Drexel University professor who is an expert in solar radiation. That prodigious snowpack is retaining about a month's worth of precipitation.
SPORTS
March 23, 2009 | By Sam Carchidi INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A month ago, Flyers goalie Marty Biron came 30 feet out of the net in the game's waning minutes, mishandled the puck and gift-wrapped the winning goal for the Pittsburgh Penguins' Sidney Crosby. Yesterday, he made amends. Biron made 27 saves and the Flyers' power play produced two goals in a methodical, 3-1 win over the Penguins at Mellon Arena. "Marty Biron stood tall," Flyers coach John Stevens said after one of his team's most impressive wins of the season. "I think his play has been outstanding.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2008 | By Kristin Granero FOR THE INQUIRER
At the Camden Adventure Aquarium, families can learn during the third annual Deep Freeze celebration about animals that live in cold climates year round. The Deep Freeze will entertain guests this weekend with seal and penguin feedings, sculpting of a 300-pound ice block, and free Turkey Hill ice cream samples from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. There will be a Coke Polar Bear Moon Bounce and the Polar Express 4D Experience in the 4D Theater. Children can warm up by participating in special activities Saturday and Sunday.
NEWS
February 7, 2007 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An Arctic air mass bringing single-digit temperatures and even colder winds claimed the life of a Camden man and may have caused the death of another man in Philadelphia as the hard freeze settled into the region. Many area residents visited stores looking for heaters and other winter supplies, only to find that some merchants - prompted by warmer temperatures earlier in the season - had begun switching displays to patio furniture and barbecue grills. Heaters and snowblowers were in short supply.
NEWS
June 6, 2006 | By Charles W. Shreiner III
Shouts of joy. Cheers of thanks. A long-awaited deep breath. Yes, it's the end of the school year. Students deserve - and need - a break from the hard work they've put in over the school year. But the summer should not mean turning off their brains for three months. The summer months can be a time of "summer learning loss," that can affect all our children. Research has shown that all students experience significant learning losses in procedural and factual knowledge during the summer months, and on average students lose about 2.6 months of grade-level equivalency in mathematical computation skills over the summer months.
SPORTS
October 13, 2004 | By Rob Parent INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
You can't blame Mike Fore for simply wanting a paid night out with the boys. For most of his working life, Fore has gotten that as an off-ice official at home games for the Flyers, who won't be starting their season as previously scheduled tonight in Tampa, Fla., against the defending Stanley Cup champion Lightning. "I'll really miss it," he said. Now that the lockout resulting from the dispute between NHL owners and the players' union has delayed the start of the season, hundreds of part-time workers such as Fore and several full-time members of the administrative staff for the Flyers and parent company Comcast-Spectacor are suffering the consequences.
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