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Deer

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NEWS
September 24, 1999 | by Bob Strauss, Los Angeles Daily News
Q. I moved to a new home that borders wetlands and has a large population of deer. I don't want to hurt anything, but I would like to grow a vegetable garden next spring. Suggestions, please. "Marathon" -- via e-mail Some time ago on your radio show you talked about five ways to repel deer. Could you repeat that info, please? Shirley Adelman Hockessin, Del. A. . .that's just a small sample of the deer concerns, questions and outright pleas we receive every week.
NEWS
November 1, 1986
This letter is in reference to the Oct. 4 editorial "Send Roxborough Deer North," in which the writer proposes that overpopulated deer at Schuylkill Valley Nature Center be moved to northern Pennsylvania, where they will disappear into the woodwork, or into the woods in this case. The editorial is written quite authoritatively, but the writer is neither an authority on relocation nor did he do much research. Fortunately, others have considered relocation and done research.
NEWS
January 26, 1991 | By Richard Kleiman, Special to The Inquirer
Gun-toting gardeners are thinning the deer herd at Longwood Gardens, but it's a messy business and it has the neighbors riled. To protect the many exotic plantings at one of the most prestigious horticultural centers in the country, Longwood's hunters have killed 24 deer since late November. John Puican, Longwood's security manager, said the deer prefer nibbling on the many varieties of succulent - and sometimes rare - plants on Longwood's southern Chester County property.
NEWS
January 10, 1992 | By Steve Edgcumbe, Special to The Inquirer
A chain-reaction accident involving a deer, a motorcycle and a car on the Schuylkill Expressway in Lower Merion early yesterday left two men injured and the deer dead, state police and ambulance attendants reported. The motorcyclist, Michael Cubbin, 23, of the 2900 block of Hannah Avenue, Norristown, was traveling west on the expressway about 3:10 a.m. when he hit the deer, state police Trooper John Long said. Cubbin was knocked from his motorcycle, which came to rest in the roadway, Long said.
NEWS
December 2, 1990 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dried corn husks crackled underfoot as Larry Waltman walked along the edge of a cornfield on his dairy farm in Penn Township, Chester County. He stopped, pointing to a narrow path disappearing into the patch of woods on his left. It was a path blazed by deer, he said. A path leading straight to the heart of his problem. Waltman snapped an ear off a 10-foot high stalk and peeled it open. The bottom half was full of plump orange-yellow kernels. The top half was a sorry looking mass of black cavities.
NEWS
January 16, 1992 | By Gwen Florio, Inquirer Staff Writer
A deer can pick its way through the woods so delicately, Carl Rausch said, that "it can walk all around you and you'll never know it's there. " But there was an ungodly racket in the underbrush yesterday just before a deer skidded to within an arm's length of Rausch, where it paused - all liquid eyes and heaving flanks - before wheeling and leaping across the road. Another 10 feet away, its companion did the same. Total elapsed time from their appearance to when Rausch reached for his shotgun as their tails bobbed mockingly away: Two heartbeats; three, max. Not enough, even with the swift kick of adrenalin, to do anything more than stare into the woods where they disappeared.
NEWS
April 5, 2001
For eight weeks, sharpshooters have culled 429 deer from Fairmount Park. The huge and hungry deer population has been a threat to other plant and animal life, since their numbers far exceed the park's ability to sustain them, a fact lost on local animal-rights activists. As a public service, we provide the following recipe for venison stew: 2 lb venison 3 lg onions, coarsely chopped 2 garlic cloves, crushed 1 tb Worcestershire sauce 1 bay leaf 1 teaspoon dried oregano 7 potatoes, peeled and quartered 1 lb carrots, cut into 1-inch pieces 1/4 c all-purpose flour Heat 2 T of oil in Dutch oven.
NEWS
January 10, 1991 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, Special to The Inquirer
The snow may have been a bit of serendipity for the deer in Ridley Creek State Park in Media, but it thwarted hunters during a two-day hunt Monday and Tuesday, holding the number of deer killed to fewer than 30. During a two-day hunt Dec. 17-18, 106 deer were killed. "The snow has caused a lower number than we expected," said park superintendent John Graham. Graham said the snow made some of the heavy brush areas where the deer gather nearly impassible, leaving hunters unable to find deer.
NEWS
November 4, 2013 | By Ashley Kuhn, Inquirer Staff Writer
Entering the fourth year of a controversial deer-culling operation, the National Park Service says the program not only has been good for Valley Forge National Historical Park, it's been good for the surviving herd. The deer generally have become healthier, heavier, and more fertile, said Deirdre Gibson, the park's chief of resources. When the program started, fewer than 1,300 deer occupied the park's 5.3 square miles, the park service estimated, or 241 per square mile. The current poulation is about 49 per square mile, Gibson said, and the goal is to get it down to between 31 and 35. Before the culling, she said, deer were eating so much vegetation the numbers of plant species were declining, as well as the animal species that depended upon them.
NEWS
July 23, 1989 | By Larisa Kuntz, Special to The Inquirer
The Tyler Committee Against Park Hunts last week received $8,000 to buy special reflectors in the hope they will reduce car-deer accidents in the heavy woods near Bucks County Community College. In 1988, 25 to 30 deer were killed by vehicles in the area surrounding the park, either on Swamp Road or Newtown-Richboro Road, according to Ed Bond, district wildlife conservation officer. The money for the reflectors, which are to be used on an experimental basis, came from the state Department of Environmental Resources.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2015
MARK BRAULT turns one shovel of heavy, water-soaked barley on the slick, painted floor of a 150-year-old timber-framed barn, and then another, and another, as country music plays on the speakers. He'll turn 3,500 pounds of grain three times this day and for 3 1/2 days total, the essential labor in a process known as floor-malting that aerates and untangles the sprouting grain. Then he'll shovel it all into a wheelbarrow and roll it into a wood-lined metal shipping container that has been converted into kiln.
NEWS
January 12, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
THERE IS a mystery deep in the Haddington Woods. Behind the Cobbs Creek bocce courts on Vine Street near Daggett, there are two forests, standing side by side, as different as night and day. One is the picture of good health - mature native trees towering toward the sun while a young generation of saplings flourishes beneath them. The neighboring forest is dying, strangled by a thick jungle of invasive vines, shrubs and trees. Why? "That's the $10,000 question," said Tom Witmer, director of natural resources for the city's Parks & Recreation Department.
REAL_ESTATE
January 11, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
I've never been interested in animal husbandry, so it was with great interest that I recently learned that deer - which don't actually qualify as domestic animals, even though they live in our neighborhoods - mate in cold weather. That information is courtesy of Bobbex, maker of what it describes as natural deer repellents. Mating makes deer more active and aggressive, and a greater threat to humans, pets, and suburban landscapes, the company says. Moving to the city won't help - in Chestnut Hill, Mount Airy, and Andorra, there seem to be more deer than people on some mornings.
NEWS
December 5, 2014 | By Kelly Flynn, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the deer herd still above target levels, and other methods of control - including contraception - deemed unsuitable, federal sharpshooters are returning to Valley Forge National Historical Park for a fifth season. To the chagrin of some animal-rights activists, the herd has been reduced by about 80 percent since the culling operation began, the park says - from 1,227 in 2009, or 241 deer per square mile, to about 250, 49 per square mile. The park says the comeback of some of the vegetation that had been decimated by the deer population speaks to the merits of the program but adds that more culling is necessary for the sake of the plant life.
NEWS
June 10, 2014 | By Erin McCarthy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jeff Houdret once enjoyed watching white-tailed deer roam Valley Forge National Historical Park. But Houdret, whose Wayne home borders Valley Forge, has not seen a deer in at least a year. "They're all gone," he said as he walked his two Yorkshire terriers through the park on Thursday afternoon. With birth control not yet a viable option for combatting deer overpopulation, officials from Valley Forge said they would continue to employ sharpshooters next winter as part of their deer management plan.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
A bankruptcy judge in Philadelphia showed a trace of impatience with creditors of Deer Meadows Retirement Community at a hearing Wednesday. "I really expect there to be a settlement here, from the facts that I've heard," said Chief Judge Eric L. Frank after a session that included an hour-long recess punctuated by testy exchanges among lawyers. "I find it astounding that there is no agreement on this," he continued, before scheduling another hearing in the case Monday. Specifically, Frank was referring to the conditions under which Deer Meadows, where nearly 500 elderly live, including many in a nursing home, is allowed to spend cash that also functions as collateral for lenders.
NEWS
May 30, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
People wandering through Ron Galati's South Philadelphia auto-body shop could be forgiven for thinking they'd stumbled upon an urban hunting lodge. There were deer heads mounted on the walls and carcasses, fur, and blood stored in the back. In reality, says Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams, the shop was an elaborate staging area for a $5 million scheme that defrauded auto insurance companies and involved a police officer and city worker. Galati - an alleged mob associate awaiting trial for paying to kill three people - was in the business, according to a grand jury, of "fictitious deer accidents.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Deer Meadows Retirement Community in Northeast Philadelphia, which filed for bankruptcy protection last month, is on track for a sale or reorganization that will allow it to keep operating, the nonprofit's chief executive, Lisa Sofia, said Monday. "The ultimate goal is for Deer Meadows to stay open, which it will," said Sofia, who assumed leadership of Deer Meadows in November 2011. That is when the continuing-care retirement community last made a bond payment. Deer Meadows, which has 491 residents and employs 369 workers, took on $28.38 million in bond debt in 1998 to build a new nursing home with space for 135 beds and then renovate the former nursing-home space into 78 personal-care units, bond offering documents said.
NEWS
May 2, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
After startling pedestrians in Center City and delaying PATCO trains on the Ben Franklin Bridge on Wednesday, a deer apparently headed to New Jersey was struck and killed by a motorist on the bridge. Deer-vehicle collisions are more common in Pennsylvania than in any other state (about 115,000 last year, according to State Farm Insurance), but they're not everyday occurrences on the bridge. The deer was first reported around Ninth and Chestnut Streets shortly after 9 a.m., according to social media reports.
NEWS
May 2, 2014 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
SOMEWHERE in Philadelphia, there's one deer breaking bad news to another. Hundreds of whitetails live all around us like ghosts, congregating in the city's parks and patches of woods, moving around silently via the trails and railways and slivers of undeveloped land. One young buck made a detour into Center City yesterday morning, though, starting somewhere around Point Breeze, according to one eyewitness. "I thought it was a large dog but it was moving way too fast and had a gait unlike any dog I've seen.
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