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Defamation

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NEWS
January 3, 1987
In regard to the flap over Fievel Mousekewitz and his seduction into a Christmas stocking by McDonald's, The Inquirer has taken a firm editorial stand in the Dec. 18 issue: "Putting the Jewish mouse on the Christian ornament took cultural understanding a step too far. Caught up in its own mission to promote good feeling beneath its unifying golden arches, McDonald's failed to recognize that certain distinctions are immune to blurring. " May I suggest certain Christian distinctions also are immune to blurring?
NEWS
February 8, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A defamation lawsuit filed by a tenured professor against the dean of the Widener University School of Law has been settled, according to an statement released by the professor's attorney. "All claims amongst all parties have been resolved amicably and Professor Connell's employment with the University and Law School has been concluded," attorney Thomas S. Neuberger stated in an email. Lawrence Connell had sued the dean, Linda L. Ammons, accusing her of intentionally making false statements in proceedings to oust him from his post at the university.
SPORTS
December 20, 2008 | Daily News Wire Services
Mississippi coach Andy Kennedy filed suit against a cabdriver who charged him with assault and a parking valet who said he witnessed the incident, charging both with defamation. Attorney Richard Katz said he filed the suit yesterday afternoon in Hamilton County (Ohio) Court of Common Pleas. Named as defendents in the suit were driver Mohammed Oulf Jiddou and valet Michael Strother. The suit asks for damages of more than $25,000 from each. Jiddou, 25, a native of Mauritania, in northwest Africa, charged that Kennedy, 40, struck him in the face and used racial insults, including calling him Osama bin Laden, after trying to get into his cab, after he and several members of his coaching staff had left a bar in downtown Cincinnati.
NEWS
August 20, 2012 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - The state's former chief dog-law enforcer is plunging into rarely traveled legal territory by suing her critics in the animal-welfare world for alleged defamation. The suit, filed Wednesday in Dauphin County Court by Jessie Smith, former special deputy secretary of the Bureau of Dog Law Enforcement, could test the boundaries of libel law in cyberspace and raises fresh issues about what constitutes malice in the public realm, a legal expert says. In her lawsuit, Smith, appointed in 2006 by then-Gov.
NEWS
July 23, 2011 | By PHILLIP LUCAS, lucasp@phillynews.com 215-854-5914
More than a year after calling celebrity fight promoter Damon Feldman a "sleaze" during an interview with Fox 29, local Fraternal Order of Police president John McNesby is being sued for defamation. It all started with a celebrity boxing match Feldman was promoting in April 2010. Feldman said the match was to honor Officer John Pawlowski, who was killed in the line of duty in February 2009. But Pawlowski's family wasn't notified and they didn't want his name associated with the event.
NEWS
March 29, 1990 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two former supervisors from Towamencin Township are suing one of the women who defeated them in the November election and her husband, charging them with defamation of character. Edward Furman and Charles Policastro filed the suit Friday in the Montgomery County Court of Common Pleas against Lillian and Robert Smith. Furman and Policastro are seeking more than $20,000 in damages, contending that during the election campaign the Smiths falsely accused them of breaching the civil rights of township residents.
NEWS
March 2, 1993 | By Christopher Durso, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
What do the Washington Redskins, the paddy wagon and Eskimos have in common? They have raised the hackles - and voices - of American Indians, the Irish and the Inuit, who find the terms offensive. Now the Welsh are elbowing up to the table of ethnic activism. Yesterday, a group of Welsh Americans from across the country filed a suit in Los Angeles County Superior Court demanding that several prominent media outlets stop using the verb welsh - lowercase w - as a way of saying: to break a promise.
NEWS
February 21, 2012 | By Mark Fazlollahand Jennifer Lin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
A federal judge has made it clear that testimony by women who said they were harassed by Carl R. Greene will play a key part in his long-running defamation lawsuit against the Philadelphia Housing Authority and its former board members. "Sexual harassment allegations are relevant," U.S. District Judge Ronald L. Buckwalter wrote in an order Thursday, allowing one of the women, Carolyn Griffith, to testify against Greene, who was fired in September 2010 as the agency's executive director after 13 years.
NEWS
May 30, 2014 | By Jason Grant, Inquirer Staff Writer
In winter 2009, Angelique Smith, a hospital worker making $11 an hour, was standing in her mother's living room in Upper Chichester when she learned she'd been targeted in a defamation lawsuit for questioning - online - whether the founder of her daughter's charter school was illegally diverting money. "I dropped to the floor and cried," she said, her voice quavering still as she described a suit that demanded hundreds of thousands of dollars in damages. "For the next two weeks, I lived at my mother-in-law's house.
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NEWS
March 20, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Jason Laughlin, and Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writers
A former FBI director and Pennsylvania State University used then-president Graham B. Spanier as the scapegoat when the school needed someone to take the fall for Jerry Sandusky's years of child molestation, Spanier contends in a suit filed Wednesday. Spanier's complaint alleged that Louis Freeh defamed him in a 2012 report that asserted that he ignored information that Sandusky, a former assistant football coach, sexually abused children, in some cases on school grounds. Spanier was "never aware of any child abuse accusations," the long-awaited suit, filed in Centre County, states, adding that he hardly knew Sandusky.
NEWS
December 12, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
A LOT of industries may be downsizing but if you're looking for areas of employment growth, you need look no further than Bill Cosby 's legal team. If they're not hiring now, they will be. Tamara Green , who accused Cosby of sexually assaulting her in the 1970s, has filed a defamation lawsuit against the comedian, alleging he "publicly branded" her a liar through statements made by his lawyer and publicist when she spoke out about his alleged conduct in 2005. Green said in the suit filed in federal court in Springfield, Mass., that Cosby drugged and assaulted her when she was an aspiring model and singer.
NEWS
May 30, 2014 | By Jason Grant, Inquirer Staff Writer
In winter 2009, Angelique Smith, a hospital worker making $11 an hour, was standing in her mother's living room in Upper Chichester when she learned she'd been targeted in a defamation lawsuit for questioning - online - whether the founder of her daughter's charter school was illegally diverting money. "I dropped to the floor and cried," she said, her voice quavering still as she described a suit that demanded hundreds of thousands of dollars in damages. "For the next two weeks, I lived at my mother-in-law's house.
NEWS
May 1, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
A defamation lawsuit by union leader John J. Dougherty against The Inquirer's editorial page staff and a former columnist has been dismissed by a Philadelphia judge. In a ruling Monday, Common Pleas Court Judge Lisa M. Rau wrote that the 2008 editorials and an opinion column by Monica Yant Kinney questioning Dougherty's suitability as a Democratic candidate for the state Senate were not defamatory. "Public comment and debate during an election is at the heart of our electoral system; without it, democracy cannot survive," Rau wrote.
NEWS
March 22, 2014 | By Thomas Fitzgerald and Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writers
State Attorney General Kathleen Kane has hired one of the most feared litigators in the region, Richard A. Sprague, to represent her in possible defamation suits arising from accounts of her decision to end an undercover investigation that taped at least five Philadelphia Democrats accepting cash or gifts. Sprague said he would launch an investigation into the conduct of the prosecutors who ran that sting operation, which began in 2010 before Kane took office. She has said the case was mismanaged, possibly tainted by racial profiling, and far too weak for any prosecutions.
NEWS
March 20, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three weeks ago, Philadelphia lawyer Richard Sprague took what legal experts called an unusual and possibly risky move: asking the state Supreme Court to take away an appeal pending before a three-judge Superior Court panel for taking too long to rule. Although cause-and-effect are impossible to prove, on March 11 the Superior Court panel issued its opinion in Sprague's pretrial appeal in a 2005 defamation lawsuit by two former Lackawanna County commissioners against the Scranton Times-Tribune newspaper.
SPORTS
July 3, 2013 | Daily News Wire Reports
FORMER Syracuse assistant basketball coach Bernie Fine is dropping his defamation lawsuit against ESPN, his lawyers said yesterday. Fine sued over broadcasts aired by ESPN with claims by two former ball boys that Fine molested them more than 2 decades ago. Fine was fired in November 2011, days after the broadcasts. The 67-year-old Fine was investigated by federal prosecutors and never charged and has maintained his innocence. William Albert, spokesman for the Harris Beach law firm, said Fine voluntarily filed notice of dismissal yesterday, although both he and his attorneys believe his legal claim has merit.
NEWS
January 17, 2013 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Springside Chestnut Hill Academy has denied that it defamed and violated the civil rights of a veteran African American math teacher who was fired in the fall for allegedly sending inappropriate text messages to a female student. In documents filed Monday in U.S. District Court, the private school disputed Arthur "Chuck" Matthews' allegations that he was unjustly terminated in September and that the action was part of a pattern of discriminatory practices the "predominately Caucasian" school had engaged in for years.
NEWS
January 16, 2013 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania State University denied defamation and wrongful-termination claims Tuesday that were lodged by a former assistant football coach who testified against Jerry Sandusky. In filings in Centre County Court, the university asked a judge to throw out a state whistle-blower lawsuit brought by Mike McQueary, arguing that any damage he endured as a result of his role as a prosecution witness was not caused by Penn State. So far, McQueary has failed to provide any evidence suggesting that Penn State officials publicly questioned his character, university counsel Nancy Conrad wrote.
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