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Defamation

NEWS
March 22, 2014 | By Thomas Fitzgerald and Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writers
State Attorney General Kathleen Kane has hired one of the most feared litigators in the region, Richard A. Sprague, to represent her in possible defamation suits arising from accounts of her decision to end an undercover investigation that taped at least five Philadelphia Democrats accepting cash or gifts. Sprague said he would launch an investigation into the conduct of the prosecutors who ran that sting operation, which began in 2010 before Kane took office. She has said the case was mismanaged, possibly tainted by racial profiling, and far too weak for any prosecutions.
NEWS
September 7, 1988 | By Marc Kaufman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Newspapers nationwide shut down their presses yesterday in a one-day strike against legislation that Indian journalists say would make defamation laws so strong that much political reporting - and virtually all investigative reporting - would become impossible. "This defamation bill is nothing but censorship in disguise," said Hiranmay Karlekar, senior editor of the Indian Express newspaper and spokesman for the Coordination Committee of the National Press. "The government set out to browbeat a vibrantly free press," he said yesterday, "and we will not allow it. " Among the most objectionable provisions of the bill, journalists say, are those that would make it a crime, punishable by up to two years in prison, to publish "scurrilous" allegations of criminal wrongdoing by public officials; that would put the burden of proof in defamation cases entirely on the press, and that would forbid reporting on meetings from which reporters have been officially barred.
NEWS
June 13, 1991 | By Marego Athans, Special to The Inquirer
A former Hainesport police officer is suing another former officer and the township, charging defamation of character and civil rights violations that stem from allegations that he intimidated a witness. Daniel Chernavsky, who was a Hainesport sergeant until the department disbanded May 1, contends in his suit that in July 1990 former Hainesport Sgt. Walt Wilson falsely told a judge and an officer in the Burlington County Prosecutor's Office that Chernavsky had talked an alleged crime victim out of pursuing criminal charges.
SPORTS
February 8, 2006 | Daily News Staff and Wire Reports
The convicted ringleader in the BALCO doping scandal settled a defamation lawsuit brought by track star Marion Jones over allegations that she used banned performance-enhancing drugs, a lawyer in the case said yesterday. Jones settled her $25 million suit in U.S. District Court in San Francisco against Victor Conte, who is serving a 4-month prison term for his role in the steroid scandal. Terms of the deal were not disclosed. Jones filed the $25 million suit in December 2004 after Conte said on the "20/20" television program and in a magazine article that he supplied Jones with an array of banned drugs that she then used to help her win five medals at the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney.
NEWS
July 6, 1991 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two Bucks County police officers, ordered by a jury to pay $300,000 for defaming a district justice, want a new trial on grounds that testimony damaging to the district justice was kept out of court. Falls Township Police Chief James Kettler and Lt. David Clark are arguing that the jury did not get an accurate picture of District Justice Joseph Basile. They say Common Pleas Court Judge George T. Kelton stopped them from pursuing questions about how Basile ran his office and private life.
NEWS
March 3, 1988 | By Lou Perfidio, Special to The Inquirer
Two members of the Lower Gwynedd Zoning Hearing Board yesterday told a Montgomery County court jury that they had no recollection of township Supervisor Janet Kirch saying to them that Frank W. Comfort Jr. "has dealings in heavy drugs. " "I couldn't repeat a word she said," Frank Vitetta, chairman of the Zoning Hearing Board, testified during the fourth day of the defamation trial of Kirch on a lawsuit filed by Comfort. "I think I would have remembered hearing Comfort's name if mentioned that night," said the other Zoning Hearing Board member, Cary Levinson.
NEWS
October 4, 2012 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mike McQueary, the former Pennsylvania State University assistant football coach turned star witness in the case against Jerry Sandusky, sued the college Tuesday, claiming defamation and unfair termination. In filings in Centre County Court, the 38-year-old alleged he was maligned for his cooperation in the state's case against the Nittany Lions' former defensive coordinator, who was convicted in June on 45 counts of child sex abuse. He is seeking $4 million. McQueary is also expected to play a key role in the forthcoming trials of two former Penn State administrators charged with failing to report Sandusky's crimes and later lying about it to a grand jury.
NEWS
June 21, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
The president and CEO of the Philly Pops has filed a defamation suit against the conductor and pianist Peter Nero, the Pops' former artistic director. Frank Giordano, who took control of the Pops and negotiated Nero's exit from the orchestra he had helped to found, filed a complaint late Wednesday in federal court accusing Nero of making "knowingly false and defamatory statements" in a June 13 article in the Allentown Morning Call. In the interview, in advance of his concert at the State Theatre in Easton, Pa., Nero said of his departure that "crooks dressed in $3,000 suits came in who didn't know a thing about the music business.
NEWS
September 16, 1990 | By Charles Pukanecz, Special to The Inquirer
A former Newtown Township official has sued three men and their Warminster business for defamation, saying they sent an anonymous letter to several municipalities and the state attorney general accusing him of unlawful behavior. M. Matthew Lahaza, the former township code enforcement officer and Planning Commission member, filed the civil lawsuit Monday in Bucks County Court against Code Inspections Inc. and its shareholders, Gerald J. and Daniel K. Azeff and James R. Cochran. The letter, dated March 30, 1989, accuses Lahaza of "a clear pattern of unlawful behavior, surreptitious double-dealing and ethically questionable behavior.
SPORTS
June 21, 2003 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Former Alabama football coach Mike Price sued Time Inc. for $20 million yesterday, contending he was defamed by a Sports Illustrated article about the strip club visit that led to his firing. The suit seeks $10 million in compensation, the value of the seven-year deal Price had with Alabama, which fired him after his night of alleged drunken carousing in Pensacola, Fla., in April. The suit, filed in state court, seeks another $10 million in punitive damages from Time, which publishes Sports Illustrated.
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