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Default Judgment

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NEWS
April 2, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
After paying $6.50 an hour to 125 nursery workers, a Philadelphia-based farm-labor contractor has been ordered to pay $146,100 in civil penalties for back wages and other federal violations. The U.S. Department of Labor in September 2014 sued Heng Heng Agency Inc. and its president, Visith Oum, for what it said were repeated and willful violations of the Fair Labor Standards Act and the Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural Worker Protection Act. From December 2010 to December 2012, 125 workers were hired for temporary work cultivating and harvesting plants at Medford Nursery Inc. in Lumberton, Burlington County.
BUSINESS
February 15, 2011 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
It's not clear how this story will turn out, but right now Patrick Rodgers is living a pay-back fantasy probably shared by millions of struggling U.S. homeowners. Frustrated by a dispute with Wells Fargo Home Mortgage and by his inability to get answers to questions, the West Philadelphia homeowner took the mortgage company to court last fall. When Wells Fargo still didn't respond, Rodgers got a $1,000 default judgment against it for failing to answer his formal questions, as required by a federal law called the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act. And when the mortgage company didn't pay - does something sound familiar?
NEWS
May 22, 1992 | by Anthony S. Twyman and Joseph R. Daughen, Daily News Staff Writers
As if the Philadelphia Housing Authority didn't have enough problems, it now faces the prospect - remote though it may be - of seeing its downtown headquarters sold at sheriff's sale for non-payment of a debt. Sheriff John Green has scheduled Sept. 14 for the sale to the highest bidder of the five-story PHA building at 20th and Chestnut streets and an accompanying parking lot. The sale can be averted if the agency reaches a settlement with the creditor, San Lucas Enterprises Inc., or arranges to dispose of a default judgment lodged against it Wednesday.
NEWS
October 4, 2012
Ill. police find huge pot harvest CHICAGO - Chicago police are busy chopping down 6- to 8-foot-tall marijuana plants that they found growing on a chunk of land the size of two football fields on the far South Side. Officers on routine patrol in a helicopter saw the crop Tuesday under a canopy of trees. Police said Wednesday that the 1,000 or so plants had been days or weeks from harvest. Once packaged, the crop could have been worth as much as $10 million. Authorities say it will take a few days to remove all the plants.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2011 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Wells Fargo, the banking Goliath, apparently met its David in Philadelphia music promoter Patrick Rodgers. On Monday, Rodgers declared victory and put away his sling. When we first met Rodgers a week ago, he was a man with a complaint about Wells Fargo Home Mortgage. He'd even volunteered his own headline: "Philadelphia homeowner 'forecloses' on Wells Fargo. " It was a slight exaggeration, but Rodgers had indeed taken Wells Fargo to Municipal Court and won a $1,000 default judgment when the mighty bank didn't bother to have anyone show up. When Wells Fargo didn't pay, Rodgers obtained a sheriff's levy to enforce the judgment.
NEWS
May 6, 2010 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
State health officials are seeking to permanently shut down a West Philadelphia abortion clinic because the doctor who ran it has not responded to their charges. The rambling, three-story structure, at 3801 Lancaster Ave., has been closed since Feb. 22 after a raid by federal drug agents and state authorities. At the same time, Kermit Gosnell's medical license was suspended by the state Board of Medicine, which called his clinic's "deplorable and unsanitary" conditions "a clear danger to the public.
NEWS
May 6, 2010 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
State health officials are seeking to permanently shut down a West Philadelphia abortion clinic because the doctor who ran it has not responded to their charges. The rambling, three-story structure, at 3801 Lancaster Ave., has been closed since Feb. 22 after a raid by federal drug agents and state authorities. At the same time, Kermit Gosnell's medical license was suspended by the state Board of Medicine, which called his clinic's "deplorable and unsanitary" conditions "a clear danger to the public.
NEWS
November 9, 1992 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The Bensalem couple followed the letter of the law and avoided paying about $4,000 to the carpet installer. They allegedly refused to be called on the carpet by not accepting the installer's mail notifying them of his civil suit against them. First, Joe Leight sent Larry H. Lefkowitz and his wife, Eve, a certified letter. But it was returned "unclaimed. " Then, he sent a regular letter, and it came back, "refused. " So, on Oct. 24, 1990, when the couple failed to show for a Municipal Court trial, Leight won a judgment of $4,075.
NEWS
August 11, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The man convicted of strangling a young woman in the "preppy murder" case says he will not fight a $25 million lawsuit filed against him by the parents of the slain woman. "My only wish is for the nightmare to end," Robert Chambers said in a handwritten note dated Tuesday. The motion, filed in state Supreme Court, will result in a default judgment being entered against the imprisoned 21-year-old, meaning he will lose all his assets for life to satisfy the $25 million claim.
NEWS
April 10, 1998 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Center City restaurant that sued a party of no-shows was awarded $2,000 yesterday when the party did not show up - this time in court. Circa restaurant said it went after Universal Skytours Inc., a New York travel agency that in January made reservations for 50 seats for dinner on Feb. 4 but seated only 10. The travel agency was handling reservations for Unisys Corp.'s worldwide employees' meeting in Philadelphia. "Basically, they took over our dining room, and then didn't show," said Circa owner David Mantelmacher after he appeared with his attorney, Joann Needleman, in Municipal Court.
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NEWS
April 2, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
After paying $6.50 an hour to 125 nursery workers, a Philadelphia-based farm-labor contractor has been ordered to pay $146,100 in civil penalties for back wages and other federal violations. The U.S. Department of Labor in September 2014 sued Heng Heng Agency Inc. and its president, Visith Oum, for what it said were repeated and willful violations of the Fair Labor Standards Act and the Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural Worker Protection Act. From December 2010 to December 2012, 125 workers were hired for temporary work cultivating and harvesting plants at Medford Nursery Inc. in Lumberton, Burlington County.
NEWS
October 4, 2012
Ill. police find huge pot harvest CHICAGO - Chicago police are busy chopping down 6- to 8-foot-tall marijuana plants that they found growing on a chunk of land the size of two football fields on the far South Side. Officers on routine patrol in a helicopter saw the crop Tuesday under a canopy of trees. Police said Wednesday that the 1,000 or so plants had been days or weeks from harvest. Once packaged, the crop could have been worth as much as $10 million. Authorities say it will take a few days to remove all the plants.
SPORTS
August 5, 2011 | DAILY NEWS WIRE REPORTS
CHINA'S MOST decorated Winter Olympic athlete, Wang Meng , has been expelled from the country's short-track speedskating squad after a drunken brawl with her team manager. "Wang Meng is expelled from the national team and is banned from international competitions as her conduct has violated the team's disciplines and jeopardized the sport's image," said a statement released late yesterday by China's General Administration of Sport. She had been suspended after the July 24 incident at a summer training camp in the eastern Chinese city of Qingdao.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2011 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Wells Fargo, the banking Goliath, apparently met its David in Philadelphia music promoter Patrick Rodgers. On Monday, Rodgers declared victory and put away his sling. When we first met Rodgers a week ago, he was a man with a complaint about Wells Fargo Home Mortgage. He'd even volunteered his own headline: "Philadelphia homeowner 'forecloses' on Wells Fargo. " It was a slight exaggeration, but Rodgers had indeed taken Wells Fargo to Municipal Court and won a $1,000 default judgment when the mighty bank didn't bother to have anyone show up. When Wells Fargo didn't pay, Rodgers obtained a sheriff's levy to enforce the judgment.
BUSINESS
February 15, 2011 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
It's not clear how this story will turn out, but right now Patrick Rodgers is living a pay-back fantasy probably shared by millions of struggling U.S. homeowners. Frustrated by a dispute with Wells Fargo Home Mortgage and by his inability to get answers to questions, the West Philadelphia homeowner took the mortgage company to court last fall. When Wells Fargo still didn't respond, Rodgers got a $1,000 default judgment against it for failing to answer his formal questions, as required by a federal law called the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act. And when the mortgage company didn't pay - does something sound familiar?
NEWS
May 6, 2010 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
State health officials are seeking to permanently shut down a West Philadelphia abortion clinic because the doctor who ran it has not responded to their charges. The rambling, three-story structure, at 3801 Lancaster Ave., has been closed since Feb. 22 after a raid by federal drug agents and state authorities. At the same time, Kermit Gosnell's medical license was suspended by the state Board of Medicine, which called his clinic's "deplorable and unsanitary" conditions "a clear danger to the public.
NEWS
May 6, 2010 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
State health officials are seeking to permanently shut down a West Philadelphia abortion clinic because the doctor who ran it has not responded to their charges. The rambling, three-story structure, at 3801 Lancaster Ave., has been closed since Feb. 22 after a raid by federal drug agents and state authorities. At the same time, Kermit Gosnell's medical license was suspended by the state Board of Medicine, which called his clinic's "deplorable and unsanitary" conditions "a clear danger to the public.
NEWS
April 10, 1998 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Center City restaurant that sued a party of no-shows was awarded $2,000 yesterday when the party did not show up - this time in court. Circa restaurant said it went after Universal Skytours Inc., a New York travel agency that in January made reservations for 50 seats for dinner on Feb. 4 but seated only 10. The travel agency was handling reservations for Unisys Corp.'s worldwide employees' meeting in Philadelphia. "Basically, they took over our dining room, and then didn't show," said Circa owner David Mantelmacher after he appeared with his attorney, Joann Needleman, in Municipal Court.
NEWS
August 1, 1996 | By Jennifer Van Doren, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For the second time in three months, Middletown Township has sued one of its residents or landowners for trashing property. The lawsuit filed against Erich A. Hering last week asks the Bucks County Court's permission for township officials to enter Hering's property at 287 Brown St., clean up the mess, and send him the bill. After years of complaints, Middletown filed a similar suit with similar requests against Buckthorn Avenue resident Hannah W. Fletcher in May. "It's not a popular thing to do to sue your own residents," said Township Solicitor Bill Dion.
NEWS
November 9, 1992 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The Bensalem couple followed the letter of the law and avoided paying about $4,000 to the carpet installer. They allegedly refused to be called on the carpet by not accepting the installer's mail notifying them of his civil suit against them. First, Joe Leight sent Larry H. Lefkowitz and his wife, Eve, a certified letter. But it was returned "unclaimed. " Then, he sent a regular letter, and it came back, "refused. " So, on Oct. 24, 1990, when the couple failed to show for a Municipal Court trial, Leight won a judgment of $4,075.
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