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NEWS
April 17, 1987 | BY JAY S. POLIS
Remember the great crackdown? On Feb. 19, U.S. Attorney General Ed Meese charged into Philadelphia, walked along 8th and Butler Streets with Mayor Goode, and declared before blazing TV lights that a great victory had been won in the war against drugs He was here to announce one of the biggest drug "sweeps" in the city's history, a 12-month police effort that netted from 800 to 1,000 arrests, and seemed to hold out to the besieged residents of...
NEWS
September 2, 2010 | By Walter Phillips
Philadelphia suffers from the highest per-capita fugitive rate in the country, with 47,000 defendants on the streets having skipped bail, as The Inquirer reported last year. There is a cheap, practical way to deal with this problem that has not been widely discussed: The city's judges should try in absentia all defendants who are freed on bail and deliberately fail to appear in court. Most of the defendants who have thumbed their noses at the system figured that, rather than appear, testify, and face cross-examination, they had better odds of beating the rap if they simply didn't show up. Despite Philadelphia's abysmal conviction rate, they were right.
NEWS
March 16, 1989 | By Susan Caba, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eugene Milano, who was to go on trial for murder yesterday with Nicodemo Scarfo and seven others, has said he wants to cooperate with authorities, law enforcement officials said yesterday. As a result, the Scarfo trial was postponed at least until today, and defense attorneys said the defection might lead them to ask for selection of a new jury - meaning an additional delay. Milano apparently telephoned authorities from prison on Tuesday. Scarfo, the other co-defendants and the defense attorneys - including Milano's own attorney - learned of his decision yesterday just minutes before opening statements were to begin in Common Pleas Court.
NEWS
April 8, 1986 | By RON AVERY, Daily News Staff Writer
Testimony in the murder trial of two Mount Airy men has lived up to the prosecutor's early billing that the evidence would be unusual and often hard to believe. A Mount Holly, N.J., jury considering murder charges against Dwayne Wright, 21, and James Clausell, 22, both of Temple Road near Upsal Street, has heard that: Edward Atwood, 37, of Willingboro, N.J., was ordered killed in 1984 because he filed a minor complaint against a neighbor for not cleaning up his dog's mess.
NEWS
March 2, 2012
The welcome decision by the Philadelphia courts to dramatically boost the fees paid to lawyers appointed to represent indigent defendants facing the death penalty strikes a long-overdue blow for justice. As long as Pennsylvania maintains what Supreme Court Justice Harold Andrew Blackmun famously called "the machinery of death," the state cannot afford to scrimp on fairness. Yet, for decades, the legal representation provided the poor in capital cases has been called into question by the courts themselves.
NEWS
September 19, 1995 | by Kitty Caparella, Daily News Staff Writer
Consider for a moment how the mighty have fallen. Reputed crime boss John Stanfa, who is supposed to wield such power over gangland slayings, a multimillion-dollar illegal gambling empire, and other illicit activities, can't get a razor in jail. His acting underboss, Frank Martines, sporting six days of growth on his face, can't get clean underwear. Nor can the other six mob guys on trial get basic toiletries or towels to take a shower. Martines' lawyer, Brian McMonagle, called it "cruel and unusual punishment" yesterday before U.S. District Judge Ronald Buckwalter, who is hearing the federal murder-racketeering trial.
NEWS
December 14, 2010 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Witness intimidation has pervaded the Philadelphia Common Pleas Court trial of two men charged with a racially tinged double murder in the Tacony section in 2007. Now, a brother of one of the defendants has been arrested in connection with the intimidation. Michael Drummond, 24, allegedly threatened a witness last week in the hallway of the city's Criminal Justice Center. Charged Saturday, he remains in custody, with bail set at $250,000, pending a Dec. 29 hearing. Gerald Drummond, 26, and Robert McDowell, 28, both white, face possible death sentences if convicted of first-degree murder in the July 13, 2007, slayings of Damien Holloway, 27, a black landscaper, and his friend and worker Timothy Clark, 15, who was white.
NEWS
July 30, 1990 | By Susan Caba, Inquirer Staff Writer
The defense and prosecution flip-flopped last week, when one of the defendants accused of killing Port Richmond teenager Sean Daily took the witness stand and became what one law enforcement observer called "a prosecutor's dream. " The damage wasn't in what James "Bebe" Martinez said about himself and the six other defendants so much as what his presence on the stand allowed Assistant District Attorney Michael McGovern to say about the slaying of Daily. McGovern was able to recapitulate three weeks of evidence he had presented earlier.
NEWS
January 12, 1989 | By Denise-Marie Santiago, Inquirer Staff Writer Inquirer correspondent Robert McSherry contributed to this article
The scene was the Montgomery County Courthouse, but it could have been a Perry Mason rerun. An Upper Merion Township man was waiting Tuesday in the hallway of the courthouse in Norristown to testify on his cousin's behalf in a rape trial when the teary-eyed complaining witness, 34, saw him and identified him as the second man who raped her. "She just walked over to me, pointed to him and said, 'That's the other guy,' " said state Trooper Robert...
NEWS
October 5, 1989 | By Emilie Lounsberry, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a speech laced with emotion and indignation, the man who headed the elite police drug unit called Five Squad portrayed himself yesterday as an aggressive foe of drug dealers and denied ever stealing money seized during police raids. "I was a captain in the Philadelphia Police Department. I would never do anything to disgrace my name," declared John Wilson at the start of his 20- minute address to a U.S. District Court jury. "I always did the right thing. " His statement - sandwiched between opening addresses by co-defendants James Cattalo and Richard Jumper - came on the first day of their racketeering retrial.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: My 9-year-old daughter is a bright, funny, creative, kind girl who has, in the past, been on the receiving end of some mean-girl behavior. We have worked with the school and with a private counselor, and she is doing better. My husband and I have a group of close friends who socialize and sometimes travel together. The daughters of two friends often leave her out. When I bring up the exclusion with the other moms, they come to the defense of their daughters.
NEWS
April 16, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
Two former aides to Gov. Christie charged in the George Washington Bridge lane-closure case say their alleged misconduct does not trigger an anticorruption law because they gained no financial benefit from the scheme. Further, there is no constitutional right to be free from "improperly created" traffic, the former aides argue in documents filed in federal court late Wednesday. They reiterated their request that U.S. District Judge Susan D. Wigenton dismiss the indictment. Prosecutors say Bridget Anne Kelly, Christie's former deputy chief of staff, and Bill Baroni, a former top Christie appointee at the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, conspired in September 2013 to cause traffic jams at the bridge in an effort to punish a local mayor because he did not endorse Christie for reelection that year.
NEWS
April 9, 2016 | By Thomas Fitzgerald and Jane M. Von Bergen, STAFF WRITERS
Over the last 48 hours, the Democratic race for president has descended into a place it had hardly ever gone: the land of invective. Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders continued a war of words Thursday. Sanders repeated his assertion that she is unqualified to be president because as a senator she voted for the Iraq war, "one of the biggest blunders in U.S. history"; backed most free-trade agreements that cost U.S. jobs; and raised millions in campaign money from Wall Street.
SPORTS
April 8, 2016 | By Marcus Hayes, DAILY NEWS COLUMNIST
AUGUSTA, Ga. - Young love runs hot. When Jordan Spieth strode Thursday to the 12th tee, the guts of Amen Corner, he was reviewing what had just happened on treacherous 11th: a risky, 218-yard approach shot and a 10-foot par save, typical of Spieth's opening-round brilliance. Suddenly, he found himself awash in adoration. Thousands of fans gave him a standing ovation. He tipped his cap once, twice, three times, and then he blushed a little bit. "It was one of the coolest moments I've ever had here," Spieth acknowledged.
NEWS
March 30, 2016
ISSUE | PHILADELPHIA SIGHTS Flower Show with a parks touch For nine days this month, visitors could hike from Independence National Historical Park to Acadia, Cape Cod, Shenandoah, Yellowstone, Yosemite, Olympia, and dozens of other national parks and historic sites - all within a few hours of the Pennsylvania Convention Center. The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society's 2016 Philadelphia Flower Show hosted 255,000 guests for "Explore America," a celebration of the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
De Niro defends anti-vax doc Robert De Niro on Friday defended the inclusion of the anti-vaccination doc Vaxxed: From Cover-Up to Conspiracy in the Tribeca Film Festival, which he cofounded, according to Variety. Directed by anti-vaccination advocate Andrew Wakefield , the film suggests there's a link between children's vaccines and autism. Wakefield lost his medical license in Britain for falsifying a 1998 study that made such a claim in the case of a vaccine that prevents measles, mumps, and rubella.
NEWS
March 25, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, STAFF WRITER
U.S. District Court Judge Nitza I. Quinones Alejandro on Wednesday ordered the Northeast Regional Council to be added as a defendant in the civil racketeering lawsuit filed in federal court by the Pennsylvania Convention Center Authority on May 7, 2015. When Edward J. Coryell was ousted as the leader of the area's union carpenters in February, the organization he headed, the Metropolitan Regional Council of Carpenters, was dissolved and incorporated into Northeast Regional Council of Carpenters, based in northern New Jersey.
NEWS
March 9, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - Senate President Stephen Sweeney on Monday defended a controversial health plan rolled out by New Jersey's largest insurer, arguing that it would help consumers, and criticized lawmakers who he said relent to groups "that bang their pots and pans the loudest. " At issue is Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey's Omnia Health Plans, under which a selected group of health systems and hospitals accept lower reimbursement rates from the insurer and charge patients less for co-payments, deductibles, and coinsurance.
NEWS
March 1, 2016
A new trial for Anthony Wright, who has spent 23 years in prison, begins this week. Maybe this time justice will be served. Wright recanted his confession soon after his arrest in the 1991 slaying murder and rape of a 77-year-old Nicetown widow. Wright said he signed the confession written by a detective without even reading it after police chained him to a chair and threatened him. Improvements in DNA testing could have freed Wright, but District Attorney Lynne Abraham continually fought defense requests to have that done.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, Staff Writer
The ACLU of Pennsylvania and the Pennsylvania Department of Human Services on Wednesday announced the settlement of a federal lawsuit over treatment delays for defendants who courts had ordered be given mental-health care. In an October lawsuit, the ACLU and its co-counsel, Arnold & Porter, alleged that severely mentally ill defendants languished in Pennsylvania's county jails, sometimes for more than a year, while awaiting treatment to restore competence, so they could stand trial. Under the settlement, Pennsylvania agreed to add nearly 200 treatment slots, including at least 50 in supportive housing in Philadelphia.
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