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Defender Association

NEWS
October 10, 2013 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
The Nutter administration plans to pay $9.5 million annually to a law firm that would represent the poor in cases where the Defender Association of Philadelphia has a conflict. It would replace the current network of more than 300 outside lawyers at multiple firms. This is a profound mistake, because the firm would replace a broken model with a cheaper one and expect better results. Outside counsel is assigned when there are multiple defendants or the client is a witness in an existing case.
NEWS
January 25, 2010 | By Craig R. McCoy, Nancy Phillips, and Dylan Purcell INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Two days before Christmas, then-Common Pleas Court Judge Joyce W. Eubanks had to decide the fate of a home health-care worker charged with looting jewelry from an arthritic woman he had been sent to assist in her Society Hill condo. Sitting without a jury, the judge found the man guilty of stealing about $14,000 in jewelry in an impulse robbery. Less than a week later, Eubanks changed her mind. She vacated her verdict and pronounced Louis L. Robinson not guilty. In brief remarks from the bench to a flabbergasted prosecutor, Eubanks said she had failed the first time around to give enough weight to the 15 character witnesses who had stood up on behalf of the accused man, though none of them testified.
NEWS
July 9, 2014 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mandatory minimum sentences for gun- and drug-related offenses are in limbo across Pennsylvania, delaying trials and causing confusion in hundreds of cases as courts grapple with a U.S. Supreme Court ruling issued last year. Despite the frustrations, some in the legal community are hoping the turbulence will draw fresh attention to a hotly disputed practice and stimulate further debate. The issue bubbled up in Bucks County in June, when five county judges signed an opinion siding with an alleged heroin dealer whose attorney had argued that the mandatory minimum sentences she was facing were unconstitutional.
NEWS
February 1, 1991 | By Henry Goldman, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the first time, a committee of the Philadelphia Bar Association has endorsed the idea of permitting the city's Defender Association to represent poor people charged with murder. In a 42-13 vote that marked a major turning point in more than a decade of debate over the issue, the Bar Association's Criminal Justice Section, mostly composed of private lawyers, accepted the argument that involving public defenders in murder cases would improve the system. In the past, the Bar Association blocked efforts to include the Defender Association in such cases, trying to preserve a system in which private lawyers received hourly fees for court appointments.
NEWS
January 23, 1987 | By EDWARD MORAN, Daily News Staff Writer
A new Police Department directive designed to reduce long lags between arrests and bail hearings is expected to be issued next week, police officials said yesterday. The directive is the work of a committee composed of representatives from the Municipal and Common Pleas courts, the Police Department, the Defender Association and the Philadelphia Bar Association. The committee was appointed by Common Pleas President Judge Edward J. Bradley in response to an incident in which a South Philadelphia man who suffered a stroke was arrested as a drunk driver and held for more than 40 hours before being arraigned.
NEWS
March 14, 2002 | By Jacqueline Soteropoulos INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia District Attorney Lynne M. Abraham's annual budget presentation to City Council yesterday turned into a critical review of her aggressive pursuit of the death penalty. Councilman Michael Nutter led much of the lengthy, and sometimes contentious, verbal sparring. Since Abraham took office in 1991, her prosecutors have sent 77 people to death row. In 1995, the New York Times Magazine dubbed her the "Deadliest D.A.," and the moniker stuck. "I'm going to uphold the death penalty as long as it's on the books in Pennsylvania," Abraham told Council.
NEWS
November 27, 1986 | By Christopher Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
A committee to study ways to speed the city's arraignment process and ensure that detainees with mental or physical problems are properly cared for was appointed yesterday by Common Pleas Court President Judge Edward J. Bradley. Bradley's move came in response to an incident in which a Northeast Philadelphia man, who was later determined to have suffered a stroke, was detained by police. The man, Robert Caraffa, 56, was arrested Oct. 17 and charged with drunken driving after the car he was driving struck a pair of parked autos.
NEWS
July 22, 1988 | By KURT HEINE, Daily News Staff Writer
Cops call it "the tank," a grimy subterranean cage in the Police Administration Building. Nearly everyone arrested in Philadelphia waits there - sometimes up to a day - to be arraigned by a city bail commissioner. Most, their advocates say, spend 18 to 22 hours crowded into a cell with about 50 prisoners, dining on cold egg sandwiches and coffee, unable to phone lawyers or get medical help. After nearly two years of vain talk about reform, the Defender Association of Philadelphia yesterday filed a federal class-action lawsuit against the city and top police and court officials, alleging that up to 38,000 people a year are subjected to "illegal and unconstitutional" confinement and "unnecessary delay" before being arraigned.
NEWS
March 25, 2004 | By Jacqueline Soteropoulos INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jurors in the rape and murder case of 6-year-old Destiny Wright remained sequestered a second night while the Pennsylvania Supreme Court considered yesterday whether a public defender should be forced to continue to represent the man accused of the crime. Assistant Defender Andrea Konow has refused to proceed with the trial of Abdul Malik El-Shabazz after he punched her cocounsel, Assistant Defender Fred Goodman, during trial on Monday. Common Pleas Court Judge Jane Cutler Greenspan found Konow in contempt and jailed her on Tuesday.
NEWS
April 21, 1990 | By Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The rape victim's mother broke down on the witness stand in Common Pleas Court. "You're lucky the cops found you before I did, because you would be dead," she shouted to admitted rapist David Hall, 21, a security guard. I want to see you dead. I hope you never forget, because I won't. God knows you should be ashamed. " Hall, of 56th Street near Girard Avenue, was in court yesterday to be sentenced for raping a 9-year-old girl in an abandoned home on Jan. 5, 1989, when he decided to plead guilty to breaking into the woman's home on July 12, 1988, and attacking her daughter as she slept on a couch.
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