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Degree Programs

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NEWS
June 16, 2010 | By Kathy Matheson, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The state university system will suspend, discontinue or merge dozens of degree programs that are under-enrolled across its 14 campuses, officials said Wednesday. The bachelor's and master's programs being culled by the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education cut across disciplines, from foreign languages to physics. Fifteen are being discontinued and at least 55 others placed in moratorium, meaning no new students will be accepted. Students currently enrolled in those majors - including incoming freshmen - will be able to finish their degrees, system officials said.
NEWS
August 31, 1999 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Neumann College, answering the demand for easy access to education, will offer two degree programs through the Internet beginning in the fall. Adult students can go online to earn an associate degree in liberal studies or a master's degree in education. These are the first online degree programs offered by the college, which started using the Internet for distance learning in January. Students can access the Net to get assignments, complete research, submit projects, and communicate with classmates and teachers.
NEWS
December 28, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Susan Snyder, and Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writers
Drexel University will end programs that allowed students to earn four-year degrees at discounted tuition rates without leaving their community college campuses. Offered at community colleges in Delaware, Montgomery, and Burlington Counties, the program sent Drexel faculty and staff members to teach courses there. Drexel did not offer a reason for the end of its program. A spokeswoman said the university would focus on encouraging community college students to transfer to its campus in Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
Keith Zakarin has a tough argument to make, but that is, after all, what lawyers are paid to do. Zakarin is a partner at Center City's Duane Morris, where he chairs a practice group that represents more than a hundred career schools and colleges and industry groups. The firm is one of a handful nationwide that have made the sector a thriving, profitable practice. Its clients are largely vocational and occupational training programs; they teach a variety of trades and skills from cosmetology to nursing to criminal justice, among many others, with degree programs of up to four years.
NEWS
March 25, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Harvey D. Wedeen, 87, of Center City, chairman of the keyboard department at Temple University's Boyer College of Music and Dance for nearly five decades and a force behind starting many of the school's degree programs, died Friday, March 13, at home. Mr. Wedeen became a faculty member at Temple in 1964, and was director of the well-regarded Temple University Music Institute at Ambler from 1971 to 1975 and the music festival's artistic director in 1974 and 1975. He helped establish the school's doctoral program in performance; the master's program in accompanying and chamber music; master's programs in piano performance and pedagogy; the Center City Temple Prep; and a program to bring free music lessons to local children.
NEWS
September 10, 1989 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Beverly McPeak never dreamed that the English course she took on a lark 12 years ago would lead to a bachelor's degree in business administration. McPeak, 44, of Warminster, who was raising two daughters and working part time as a secretary, took the course because her girlfriend didn't want to go to Montgomery County Community College alone. Today, McPeak is 12 credits away from earning her bachelor's degree at Gwynedd Mercy College in Lower Gwynedd. Her girlfriend, Barbara Rossbauer, graduated from the school last month.
NEWS
January 13, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
The community colleges in Burlington and Gloucester Counties, having formed partnerships with nearby Rowan University, took a step Monday to further intertwine their schools. The presidents of Rowan College at Burlington County and Rowan College at Gloucester County said their schools would work with Rowan University to create bachelor's degree programs in which the first three years are offered by the community colleges. The program could begin as early as this fall. The cost of attending community college for three years is about equal to one year at Rowan University, the presidents said.
NEWS
November 16, 2012
A $5.1 million grant for Rowan University to expand its downtown Camden campus was approved Thursday by the New Jersey Economic Development Authority board. The grant will go toward the university's $13.5 million redevelopment of the former First Camden National Bank & Trust building, a university spokesman said. Rowan's Camden enrollment has doubled to more than 800 students in recent years, with classes held in a building shared with Camden County at Broadway and Cooper Street, across from the old bank.
NEWS
June 18, 2016 | By Martha Woodall, Staff Writer
Drexel University on Thursday named a new dean for its College of Computing and Informatics. Yi Deng, 56, who has led the College of Computing and Informatics at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte for six years, will join Drexel in September. He replaces David Fenske, who retired. At UNC Charlotte, Deng is credited with contributing to dramatic growth in both enrollment and research funding. Drexel provost M. Brian Blake said in a statement that welcoming Deng to campus ensured that "a college, already on a rising trajectory, continues on its path of success with a shared vision to address the nation's fastest-growing job sector.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
August 17, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
Keith Zakarin has a tough argument to make, but that is, after all, what lawyers are paid to do. Zakarin is a partner at Center City's Duane Morris, where he chairs a practice group that represents more than a hundred career schools and colleges and industry groups. The firm is one of a handful nationwide that have made the sector a thriving, profitable practice. Its clients are largely vocational and occupational training programs; they teach a variety of trades and skills from cosmetology to nursing to criminal justice, among many others, with degree programs of up to four years.
NEWS
June 24, 2016 | By Janaki Chadha, Staff Writer
In what is likely to be a rigorous cross-disciplinary experience, the University of Pennsylvania will launch a program next year that would offer candidates a chance to earn degrees in law and medicine. It will take students six years to complete, while a medical degree takes four years and a law degree three. The program will be directed primarily at students pursuing medical careers, with the aim of helping future doctors gain skills that could prove valuable in parts of the field where the importance of legal knowledge is growing.
NEWS
June 18, 2016 | By Martha Woodall, Staff Writer
Drexel University on Thursday named a new dean for its College of Computing and Informatics. Yi Deng, 56, who has led the College of Computing and Informatics at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte for six years, will join Drexel in September. He replaces David Fenske, who retired. At UNC Charlotte, Deng is credited with contributing to dramatic growth in both enrollment and research funding. Drexel provost M. Brian Blake said in a statement that welcoming Deng to campus ensured that "a college, already on a rising trajectory, continues on its path of success with a shared vision to address the nation's fastest-growing job sector.
NEWS
May 28, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
New Jersey higher-education grants totaling about $11 million to Beth Medrash Govoha yeshiva and Princeton Theology Seminary are unconstitutional, a panel of state appellate judges ruled Thursday. The American Civil Liberties Union led a lawsuit filed in June 2013 against Rochelle Hendricks, the state secretary of higher education, and Andrew P. Sidamon-Eristoff, then the state treasurer. The ACLU says the grants of $10.6 million to the yeshiva and $645,000 to the seminary were unconstitutional because of the schools' religious nature.
NEWS
January 13, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
The community colleges in Burlington and Gloucester Counties, having formed partnerships with nearby Rowan University, took a step Monday to further intertwine their schools. The presidents of Rowan College at Burlington County and Rowan College at Gloucester County said their schools would work with Rowan University to create bachelor's degree programs in which the first three years are offered by the community colleges. The program could begin as early as this fall. The cost of attending community college for three years is about equal to one year at Rowan University, the presidents said.
NEWS
January 11, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
A proposal by two North Jersey community colleges to confer bachelor's degrees in nursing has divided the state's college presidents, with each side accusing the other of not addressing students' needs. Passaic County Community College and Union County College are both looking to confer bachelor's degrees in nursing, adding two years to their associate's degree programs. Other New Jersey community colleges back those proposals, citing affordability for students and rising standards in the nursing profession.
NEWS
November 10, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
The list of New Jersey colleges is steadily shrinking, with one college after another disappearing across the state this year alone. Felician and Richard Stockton Colleges no longer exist. Thomas Edison State College is in the process of fading away. But don't panic. The schools have, in a sense, been upgraded: Felician University, Stockton University and (soon, maybe) Thomas Edison State University. "The name Felician College may be no more," Sister M. Aquinas Szott, president of the Bergen County school's trustees, said when the new designation was announced Oct. 30, "but its values and Franciscan mission will carry on in Felician University.
NEWS
September 4, 2015
WHEN I THINK of paying for college, I'm reminded of the opening lines from the original "Star Trek" TV series. "Space: the final frontier. These are the voyages of the starship Enterprise. Its five-year mission: to explore strange new worlds, to seek out new life and new civilizations, to boldly go where no man has gone before. " I shiver every time I hear that opening. Yes, I'm a Trekkie. Now let me put my own spin on it: "Paying for college: a scary frontier. This is a voyage that drives families mad. The mission: to explore college possibilities, to seek out free money, to boldly send their children where many have gone before so they won't come back home.
NEWS
March 25, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Harvey D. Wedeen, 87, of Center City, chairman of the keyboard department at Temple University's Boyer College of Music and Dance for nearly five decades and a force behind starting many of the school's degree programs, died Friday, March 13, at home. Mr. Wedeen became a faculty member at Temple in 1964, and was director of the well-regarded Temple University Music Institute at Ambler from 1971 to 1975 and the music festival's artistic director in 1974 and 1975. He helped establish the school's doctoral program in performance; the master's program in accompanying and chamber music; master's programs in piano performance and pedagogy; the Center City Temple Prep; and a program to bring free music lessons to local children.
NEWS
December 28, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Susan Snyder, and Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writers
Drexel University will end programs that allowed students to earn four-year degrees at discounted tuition rates without leaving their community college campuses. Offered at community colleges in Delaware, Montgomery, and Burlington Counties, the program sent Drexel faculty and staff members to teach courses there. Drexel did not offer a reason for the end of its program. A spokeswoman said the university would focus on encouraging community college students to transfer to its campus in Philadelphia.
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