CollectionsDel Ennis
IN THE NEWS

Del Ennis

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
February 10, 1996 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
Del Ennis, the home-grown slugging outfielder with the Phillies' 1950 National League champions, died of complications from diabetes late Thursday night at his Huntingdon Valley home. He was 70. Signed out of Olney High in 1942 by scout Jocko Collins, Ennis played 14 seasons in the major leagues. From 1946 to '56, he was with the Phillies. He had a career batting average of .284, hit 288 home runs and drove in 1,284 runs. On the Phillies' all-time list, Ennis's 259 homers are runner-up to Mike Schmidt.
SPORTS
June 29, 2003 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Pat Burrell struck out late in a recent Phillies' loss, the boos gusted out of Veterans Stadium's grandstands like a bitter wind. Trying to provide perspective, the TV broadcasters mentioned the historically stormy relationship between Phillies sluggers and fans. At her Huntingdon Valley home, watching on a TV set that sat beneath a portrait of her late husband in the uniform of his beloved hometown team, Liz Ennis cringed. "I knew what was coming," she said. "Sure enough, they said, 'You know, there used to be a great player in this town who was always booed.
SPORTS
July 17, 2003 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There is something sadly appropriate about the season-long slump that has ensnared Pat Burrell like the grip of a bat-numbing boa - the snake, not the manager. The Phillies, after all, in their 120-year history have been a kind of Slump Central, a franchise virtually unsurpassed in both team and individual failings. Newly arrived from Worcester, the 1883 Phils were victorious in 17 of 99 games. Seventy-eight years later, in 1961, having won just two pennants and no World Series in the interim, they managed a record 23 consecutive losses.
NEWS
April 10, 2001
William C. Kashatus (OpEd column, April 5) said that when retiring No. 14 in honor of Jim Bunning, the Phillies should have also retired it in Pete Rose's honor. But the only true Philadelphian to wear No. 14, a man who left an indelible mark of his own, was Del Ennis, slugging hero of the 1950 Whiz Kids, whose 11 years in a Phillies uniform equals the combined number of years spent here by Bunning and Rose. I won't quibble with Kashatus' flattering litany of the careers of Bunning and Rose (they were remarkable players and the Phillies benefited from their talents)
SPORTS
January 31, 2012
Former Phillies leftfielder Pat Burrell, the first overall pick in the 1998 draft, is going to retire, according to a report on MLBTradeRumors.com. Burrell, 35, has a severe foot injury and was a free agent this offseason after spending last year with his hometown San Francisco Giants. "I talked to him last fall and his foot was killing him," Phillies manager Charlie Manuel said Monday night at the Philadelphia Sports Writers Association dinner. "He had a bad arch and trouble with his heel.
SPORTS
May 9, 2011 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Liz Ennis had the message ready, just as soon as Ryan Howard supplanted her husband as the Phillies' No. 2 all-time home run hitter. "Continued success as you add to your home run total for many years to come," the note to Howard read. "Congratulations on your new place in Phillies history. " Ennis is the widow of Del Ennis, the man Howard supplanted Saturday night with his 260th home run to move into second place behind Mike Schmidt. Ennis ended his Phillies career with 259 homers.
SPORTS
January 10, 2001 | By Bob Brookover, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jim Bunning's No. 14 will be retired by the Phillies before their April 6 home opener at Veterans Stadium, the team announced yesterday. The Hall of Fame pitcher will become the fifth Phillies player whose number is retired. He is joining Robin Roberts, Richie Ashburn, Steve Carlton and Mike Schmidt. "Jim won the first game at Veterans Stadium 30 years ago this April, and it is fitting that we honor him at this year's home opener," said Larry Shenk, the team's vice president of public relations.
SPORTS
August 9, 2015 | By Jake Kaplan, Inquirer Staff Writer
SAN DIEGO - The Phillies mustered only eight hits over 12 innings of Friday night's series opener against the San Diego Padres at Petco Park. They won, 4-3, only because four of those hits left the yard. Cameron Rupp's solo home run in the top of the 12th, the Phillies' fourth of the game, served as the game-winner. The Phils' catcher unloaded on a full-count fastball from righthander Kevin Quackenbush and sent it an estimated 416 feet over the center-field wall. Domonic Brown, Ryan Howard and Cody Asche accounted for the other Phillies' homers, each coming off Padres ace James Shields.
SPORTS
October 30, 2000 | by Bob Vetrone Jr., Daily News Sports Writer
They finished playing baseball in New York last week, but the Broad Street Subway Series just had to go seven games. Below is the final installment of the series, pitting Philadelphia A's and Phillies players of all eras against each other in an imaginary, never-in-a-lifetime event. Larry Bowa started the Phillies' comeback in their Game 1 victory with his baserunning, so it was only fitting that his hitting won Game 7 after their defense gave him the chance. Bowa's 10th-inning single scored two Hall of Fame teammates as the Phillies - who came back from a four-run deficit in the ninth - topped the A's, 9-8, and won the Broad Street Subway Series, four games to three.
SPORTS
April 7, 1986 | By RICH ASHBURN, Daily News Sports Columnist
The "Whiz Kids" was an expression coined by Babe Alexander, who served as traveling secretary for the Phillies in the late '40s and early '50s. "Whiz" describes someone who is skilled or adroit at something. "Kids" is self-descriptive. And, because the Phillies were young and displayed some unusual skills at times, especially in 1950, Alexander created the Whiz Kids. The Whiz Kids never should be confused with the Yankees of the late '20s, the Brooklyn Dodgers of the early '50s, the Milwaukee Braves of the late '50s or the Cincinnati Reds of the late '70s.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
August 9, 2015 | By Jake Kaplan, Inquirer Staff Writer
SAN DIEGO - The Phillies mustered only eight hits over 12 innings of Friday night's series opener against the San Diego Padres at Petco Park. They won, 4-3, only because four of those hits left the yard. Cameron Rupp's solo home run in the top of the 12th, the Phillies' fourth of the game, served as the game-winner. The Phils' catcher unloaded on a full-count fastball from righthander Kevin Quackenbush and sent it an estimated 416 feet over the center-field wall. Domonic Brown, Ryan Howard and Cody Asche accounted for the other Phillies' homers, each coming off Padres ace James Shields.
SPORTS
January 31, 2012
Former Phillies leftfielder Pat Burrell, the first overall pick in the 1998 draft, is going to retire, according to a report on MLBTradeRumors.com. Burrell, 35, has a severe foot injury and was a free agent this offseason after spending last year with his hometown San Francisco Giants. "I talked to him last fall and his foot was killing him," Phillies manager Charlie Manuel said Monday night at the Philadelphia Sports Writers Association dinner. "He had a bad arch and trouble with his heel.
SPORTS
May 9, 2011 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Liz Ennis had the message ready, just as soon as Ryan Howard supplanted her husband as the Phillies' No. 2 all-time home run hitter. "Continued success as you add to your home run total for many years to come," the note to Howard read. "Congratulations on your new place in Phillies history. " Ennis is the widow of Del Ennis, the man Howard supplanted Saturday night with his 260th home run to move into second place behind Mike Schmidt. Ennis ended his Phillies career with 259 homers.
SPORTS
April 15, 2011 | By Paul Hagen
Here's how it's too often stated: Ryan Howard needs four more home runs to move into second place on the Phillies' all-time list, trailing only Hall of Famer Mike Schmidt. Which is both true and all wrong at the same time. Because the name of the current runner-up shouldn't be glossed over. Del Ennis don't get no respect. Didn't when he was playing. Didn't after he retired. Doesn't now. Hard to say why. A graduate of Olney High School who starred for his hometown team, he made the National League All-Star team as a rookie in 1946 even though he didn't make his major league debut until April 28 after being discharged from the Navy.
SPORTS
July 17, 2003 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There is something sadly appropriate about the season-long slump that has ensnared Pat Burrell like the grip of a bat-numbing boa - the snake, not the manager. The Phillies, after all, in their 120-year history have been a kind of Slump Central, a franchise virtually unsurpassed in both team and individual failings. Newly arrived from Worcester, the 1883 Phils were victorious in 17 of 99 games. Seventy-eight years later, in 1961, having won just two pennants and no World Series in the interim, they managed a record 23 consecutive losses.
SPORTS
June 29, 2003 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Pat Burrell struck out late in a recent Phillies' loss, the boos gusted out of Veterans Stadium's grandstands like a bitter wind. Trying to provide perspective, the TV broadcasters mentioned the historically stormy relationship between Phillies sluggers and fans. At her Huntingdon Valley home, watching on a TV set that sat beneath a portrait of her late husband in the uniform of his beloved hometown team, Liz Ennis cringed. "I knew what was coming," she said. "Sure enough, they said, 'You know, there used to be a great player in this town who was always booed.
NEWS
April 10, 2001
William C. Kashatus (OpEd column, April 5) said that when retiring No. 14 in honor of Jim Bunning, the Phillies should have also retired it in Pete Rose's honor. But the only true Philadelphian to wear No. 14, a man who left an indelible mark of his own, was Del Ennis, slugging hero of the 1950 Whiz Kids, whose 11 years in a Phillies uniform equals the combined number of years spent here by Bunning and Rose. I won't quibble with Kashatus' flattering litany of the careers of Bunning and Rose (they were remarkable players and the Phillies benefited from their talents)
SPORTS
January 13, 2001 | By Bob Brookover, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jim Bunning figures this is the final tribute to his remarkable baseball career. That it comes 30 years after he threw his final pitch in a Phillies uniform doesn't bother him in the least. After 17 seasons in the game and a 25-year wait to get into the Hall of Fame, Bunning learned earlier this week that the Phillies planned to retire No.14 in his honor before their 2001 home opener on April 6 at Veterans Stadium. "I was pretty excited," the U.S. senator from Kentucky said yesterday from his office in Washington.
SPORTS
January 10, 2001 | By Bob Brookover, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jim Bunning's No. 14 will be retired by the Phillies before their April 6 home opener at Veterans Stadium, the team announced yesterday. The Hall of Fame pitcher will become the fifth Phillies player whose number is retired. He is joining Robin Roberts, Richie Ashburn, Steve Carlton and Mike Schmidt. "Jim won the first game at Veterans Stadium 30 years ago this April, and it is fitting that we honor him at this year's home opener," said Larry Shenk, the team's vice president of public relations.
SPORTS
October 30, 2000 | by Bob Vetrone Jr., Daily News Sports Writer
They finished playing baseball in New York last week, but the Broad Street Subway Series just had to go seven games. Below is the final installment of the series, pitting Philadelphia A's and Phillies players of all eras against each other in an imaginary, never-in-a-lifetime event. Larry Bowa started the Phillies' comeback in their Game 1 victory with his baserunning, so it was only fitting that his hitting won Game 7 after their defense gave him the chance. Bowa's 10th-inning single scored two Hall of Fame teammates as the Phillies - who came back from a four-run deficit in the ninth - topped the A's, 9-8, and won the Broad Street Subway Series, four games to three.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|