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Delaware Bay

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NEWS
June 27, 2002 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Harold H. Haskin, 87, a scientist, a retired Rutgers University professor, and an internationally recognized expert on oysters and clams, died of pneumonia Sunday at his home in Cape May Court House, N.J.. As a scientist, Mr. Haskin was known for his research on oyster biology. His breeding program produced disease-resistant oysters and helped stop the massive deaths of the shellfish in and around the Delaware Bay. As a teacher, Mr. Haskin was known for combining the classroom and the outdoors.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marc Zitter enjoyed a special plate of oysters at the Washington Inn in Cape May last weekend. They were his, grown on the tidal flats of the lower Delaware Bay and among the first he has sold to restaurants since leaving his job as a heavy-equipment operator 18 months ago to become an oyster farmer. "The display on the plate was pretty awesome," Zitter, who just three weeks ago started selling his oysters under the brand Salty Lady, said in an interview Thursday. "It was nice to see, like I finally made it. " Zitter, 43, is part of a slowly and quietly emerging oyster-farming industry along the Delaware Bay, where oysters were nearly wiped out in the second half of the 20th century by disease and pollution.
NEWS
August 12, 2010 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
All day Wednesday, customers coming into Ben Budd's bait-and-tackle shop in Cape May County marveled at the thousands of dead menhaden they had seen along the Delaware Bay shoreline. By late afternoon, the state Department of Environmental Protection had announced that it was investigating what it termed a "major" washup of dead fish. Officials reported that the swath of dead menhaden - a small bait fish also known as peanut bunker - extended along seven to eight miles of shoreline from Kimbles Beach in Middle Township south to Villas in Lower Township, including an area known as Pierces Point.
NEWS
November 21, 1997 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Fenton Anderson, 84, the dean of the Delaware Bay oystermen, died Tuesday at South Jersey Hospital Systems/Bridgeton Division. Born in Bivalve, he was a lifelong resident of Port Norris, both in Cumberland County. Mr. Anderson was the retired captain of the 65-foot schooner Martha Meerwald and was the former owner of the Washburn and Anderson Oyster Co. He began oystering in 1934 as a young man in his 20s, but he had worked in the industry his entire life. His father and grandfather had both been oystermen.
NEWS
January 18, 2016 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Staff Writer
BIVALVE, N.J. - Years ago, when Meghan Wren was hiking through a boat "graveyard" in nearby Leesburg, she discovered the rotting remains of a wooden yawl. The hundred-year-old wreck so intrigued Wren - founder and executive director of the Bayshore Center at Bivalve - that she began studying how these boats were traditionally used as auxiliary craft to schooners and other vessels along the Delaware Bay and elsewhere. Usually rigged as a two-masted sailing craft, yawls often were favored over other types of dinghy in commercial fishing operations because the mizzen sail is in the aft, creating easier handling in rough seas.
NEWS
May 21, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
VILLAS, N.J. - As other crew members hid behind the dunes, so as not to spook the birds, Larry Niles and Clive Minton peered through binoculars at the trap down the beach. The group had dug a shallow trench, folded a 30- by 60-foot net into it, and hidden it with dried seaweed. Three small cannons were buried along the net, too. All they needed now was to catch the birds. A flock of about 350 was down at the waterline of the Delaware Bay beach. The rising tide was pushing them toward the net. Closer and closer they came.
NEWS
March 15, 2009
LOWER TOWNSHIP, N.J. - Authorities were trying to determine if remains found on a Delaware Bay beach yesterday are human. A woman out walking found the remains, which were "pretty decayed" and will be sent to the Southern Regional Medical Examiner's Office for study, Lower Township police said. The Cape May County Prosecutor's Office and township police cordoned off the site and conducted a detailed search of the area, but no more remains were found. - AP
NEWS
March 10, 1989 | By Elizabeth Hallowell, Special to The Inquirer
A tanker carrying 45.7 million gallons of oil ran aground on a sand shoal in the Delaware Bay about four miles off shore from here early yesterday morning. No leaking had occurred as of late yesterday afternoon, but state emergency workers were on standby as U.S. Coast Guard and state environmental officials planned to lighten the ship's cargo load and set it afloat around midnight. The Notos, chartered by Chevron Corp. and sailing under the Liberian flag, was bound for the Chevron refinery in Philadelphia from Aruba when it anchored about 25 miles north of Lewes, Del. for lightering - the siphoning of some of its oil onto smaller barges so that the ship can navigate the shallower waters of the upper Delaware Bay and River.
NEWS
June 12, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
The small shorebird - a ruddy turnstone - was not happy. Moments ago, it had been feasting on horseshoe crab eggs along the waterline of Delaware Bay near Villas, N.J. But now, University of Georgia researcher Deb Carter had a gentle but inescapable grip on the bird, and her colleague Clara Kienzle was sticking a cotton swab down its throat. Next, they swabbed the bird's other end and then jabbed a slim needle into a vein to draw blood before releasing it. Their goal: to see if this healthy bird was carrying a flu virus.
NEWS
August 2, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Shortly after dawn Saturday, Meghan Wren will smear herself with Vaseline and lanolin, wade into the Delaware Bay at Port Mahon, Del., and start swimming. Eight to 10 hours and 13 miles later - having bucked the currents and crossed the shipping channel and endured numerous jellyfish stings, notwithstanding the protective goo - she'll reach New Jersey, coming ashore at Fortescue, Cumberland County. If the weather holds. And if she's lucky. "I don't know how many people think about the bay as a swimmable place," Wren said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
June 27, 2016
Maritime touring Delaware. Tuesday trolley tours explore maritime history in the Cape Henlopen area. Hear about the lighthouses, fishing, shipbuilding, and wartime importance of the Delaware Bay region from the 17th century on. Ticket info online. Maritime Trolley Tours, Lewes, July 5 through Sept. 6. www.historiclewes.org/visit/tours/maritime-trolley-tour-0 Mellow happening New Jersey. Music and art festival with local artists, evening musical performances, craftspeople, beer garden, and more than 20 food vendors, serving everything from seafood to ethnic.
NEWS
May 17, 2016
Lapped by barely audible waves, the Delaware Bay beaches seem peaceful, but they are the scene of a roaring man-vs.-nature struggle. Oyster farmers are vying with red knots, a threatened bird species, for the shoreline where the migrating avians stop and feed before continuing their epic journey from South America to the Arctic. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recently granted the farmers a permit to encroach on the birds' feeding grounds. But the shore is big enough to accommodate both.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
The project to deepen the Delaware River navigation channel will receive $22 million in the Army Corps of Engineers' current fiscal year work plan and $33 million in President Obama's proposed budget for fiscal year 2017, which begins Oct. 1, according to Sen. Robert P. Casey (D., Pa.). About 80 percent of the channel is now at or deeper than 45 feet, and the dredging work that began in March 2010 should be completed next year, said Ed Voigt, public affairs chief for the Army Corps' Philadelphia District.
NEWS
January 18, 2016 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Staff Writer
BIVALVE, N.J. - Years ago, when Meghan Wren was hiking through a boat "graveyard" in nearby Leesburg, she discovered the rotting remains of a wooden yawl. The hundred-year-old wreck so intrigued Wren - founder and executive director of the Bayshore Center at Bivalve - that she began studying how these boats were traditionally used as auxiliary craft to schooners and other vessels along the Delaware Bay and elsewhere. Usually rigged as a two-masted sailing craft, yawls often were favored over other types of dinghy in commercial fishing operations because the mizzen sail is in the aft, creating easier handling in rough seas.
NEWS
November 2, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
LOWER TOWNSHIP, N.J. - As the Jersey Shore's fledgling oyster aquaculture industry continues to expand, a new study proposes that it be restricted because of its potential harmful impact on the endangered red knots and other migratory birds along the state's Delaware Bay shoreline. An environmental report by the state Endangered and Nongame Species Program suggests that oyster aqua-farmers should have limited access to their crops on the bay during the spring migration of the red knot.
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
Somewhere in a remote part of Canada, antennae are likely picking up the signals of 100 shorebirds that just weeks ago were on the beaches of Delaware Bay, where they were caught with giant nets and fitted with tiny transmitters. The birds are robin-size creatures called red knots. After precipitous declines in their population on the bay - from about 100,000 birds in the 1990s to about 12,000 a few years ago - federal officials designated them as threatened in December. Researchers know that red knots have one of the longest migrations on the planet - from the tip of South America to their breeding grounds in the Arctic.
NEWS
June 12, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
The small shorebird - a ruddy turnstone - was not happy. Moments ago, it had been feasting on horseshoe crab eggs along the waterline of Delaware Bay near Villas, N.J. But now, University of Georgia researcher Deb Carter had a gentle but inescapable grip on the bird, and her colleague Clara Kienzle was sticking a cotton swab down its throat. Next, they swabbed the bird's other end and then jabbed a slim needle into a vein to draw blood before releasing it. Their goal: to see if this healthy bird was carrying a flu virus.
NEWS
May 24, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
MEMORIAL Day was founded to honor those who died while in service to the country. Marvin Hume, a wounded World War II vet, didn't die while serving on a battlefield or warship. He died after serving America in an extraordinary way over a span of four decades in lovely Cape May Point, N.J. Each morning, from Memorial Day to Sept. 30, Hume would raise the casket flag of a deceased military member. At sunset, in a simple and deeply moving public ceremony, he'd lower the flag, help the deceased soldier's family refold it into a perfect triangle and hand it back to them.
BUSINESS
May 21, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
About 75 percent of the Delaware River navigation channel is now at or deeper than 45 feet, and the dredging work that began in March 2010 should be completed in mid-2017, state and federal officials said Tuesday. Gov. Wolf last week released an additional $18.6 million for deepening a 103-mile stretch from Philadelphia and Camden to the Atlantic Ocean from 40 to 45 feet to accommodate larger ships. The state of Pennsylvania, as the local project partner, will contribute 35 percent of the cost of the $360 million multiyear deepening project.
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