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Delaware River

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NEWS
May 10, 2011
A look at the tortured history of Delaware River waterfront development: 1987: The city tries to lure Disney to the waterfront for a $300 million project. 1989: Developer Willard Rouse backs out on a $700 million retail/restaurant/housing development. Former Philadelphia City Councilman Leland Beloff later goes to jail for trying to extort him. 1997: Officials in New Jersey and Pennsylvania express interest in a tram over the river that would have cost close to $42 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1996 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Stacy Levy makes art by exploiting natural phenomena such as rain and wind. Her two Philadelphia exhibitions, at University of the Arts and Larry Becker Gallery, explore the underappreciated role that water plays in everyday life. "Watercourse," an installation in the university's Rosenwald-Wolf Gallery, is really more of a Franklin Institute-style science project, although it's executed with an artist's sensibility. Using several thousand water-filled plastic cups in three sizes (the kind used to dispense cheap wine at art openings)
NEWS
May 5, 2013
A woman was in critical condition Saturday after being pulled from the Delaware River and resuscitated by police. The Marine Unit received a call just after 9 a.m. about a person floating in the river behind the Sugar House Casino. Police on scene were able to pull the unconscious woman from the river and resuscitate her. Medics took her to Hahnemann University Hospital, where she was listed in critical condition Saturday morning. – Jonathan Lai
NEWS
February 12, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
A body was found Saturday in the Delaware River behind the Adventure Aquarium in Camden. Camden fire crews responded about 4 p.m. after an aquarium employee discovered the body. The body was identified Monday as that of David Opoku, 27. Coast Guard officials said Opoku was wearing a blue jumpsuit. State police officials said he was often around the Camden area and in Trenton. The state police major-crimes unit is investigating. mboren@phillynews.com 856-779-3829 @borenmc
NEWS
May 21, 1991 | By Marilou Regan, Special to The Inquirer
Two Delaware County men remained missing yesterday after they fell from a 19-foot powerboat Sunday night while making a sharp turn during an outing on the Delaware River, police said. The boat was found in the river shortly before dawn yesterday, but no one was aboard, police said. Carl Gurer, 50, of Ridley Township, and Daniel Devaco, 48, of Essington, were lost about 9:30 p.m. Sunday near Philadelphia International Airport, according to police. A third person, Donna Weber, 32, of Collingdale, also fell from the boat, but she managed to swim to an unnamed island 50 to 100 yards from shore, where she collapsed, according to police.
NEWS
November 22, 1995 | By Douglas A. Campbell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As a calamity, the oil spill early yesterday morning on the Delaware River was no Exxon Valdez. About 160 gallons of crude oil mixed with diesel fuel "burped" out of a vent on the 900-foot tanker Sologne, which was moored at the Coastal Eagle Point refinery, according to Commander Michael D. Riley of the U.S. Coast Guard. There were no birds with oil-packed feathers, Riley said. There was no fouled coastline. But there was a sheen that spread about four miles downstream, to the Mantua Creek anchorage, Riley said.
BUSINESS
October 3, 2009 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In what could be another blow to the long-delayed deepening of the Delaware River, U.S. House and Senate budget negotiators have restricted an annual federal appropriation for the project, seen as a boon to the region's economy and ports. But Sen. Arlen Specter (D., Pa.) and Pennsylvania port officials said yesterday that the measure would not block the dredging from the current 40 feet to 45 feet once the Army Corps of Engineers decides to begin. The appropriations bill still must be approved by the full House and Senate.
NEWS
July 17, 2008
TRENTON - A stretch of the lower Delaware River is getting a special classification to protect it from pollution. The Delaware River Basin Commission yesterday approved the designation of the river as special protection waters. That designation limits direct discharges of wastewater into the river. The ruling affects the area of the river between the Delaware Water Gap and Trenton. The upper part of the river, north of the Delaware Water Gap, received the designation in 1992. The Delaware River Basin Commission's members include the governors of New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware and New York as well as a representative of the Army Corps of Engineers.
NEWS
April 14, 2012
A badly decomposed body was recovered from the Delaware River around midday Saturday, Philadelphia police said. The body was found floating by a pier near Delaware Avenue and Spring Garden Street, police said. Marine and rescue units were called to recover the body. Police could not provide the victim's name, sex or other details.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 11, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
Standing in the swift, ankle-deep current of the Tookany Creek on Monday afternoon, DaiJzanaee Martinez dipped a fine-meshed net into the water to gauge the creek's overall well-being. She was delighted to find a juvenile mayfly, an insect that does not thrive in polluted water. "It must be good water," said Martinez, 18, a senior at the Philadelphia High School for Creative and Performing Arts. In some respects, yes, but the creek is one of hundreds in the Delaware River watershed that need care and monitoring.
NEWS
May 9, 2016
As Alexander Hamilton enjoys a musical makeover and star turn on Broadway, hum along to the story of a truly musical treasury official: Francis Hopkinson, treasurer of the Continental Loan Office. Born in Philadelphia to a prominent family, Hopkinson (1737-1791) was a member of the first graduating class of the College of Philadelphia (now the University of Pennsylvania) in 1757. Before returning for an advanced degree, Hopkinson wrote "My Days Have Been So Wondrous Free," commonly regarded as the first secular musical composition by an American composer.
NEWS
April 22, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, STAFF WRITER jlaughlin@phillynews.com 215-854-4587 @jasmlaughlin
Operating the Delaware River's ferry has been a losing proposition for the Delaware River Port Authority, but a vote Wednesday will give a Philadelphia nonprofit a shot at using the boat to improve waterfront tourism. After operating the service for 16 years, the DRPA approved a plan to hand ownership of the RiverLink Ferry (named Freedom), which travels between Penn's Landing and Camden, to the Delaware River Waterfront Corp. The decision at the authority's monthly board meeting caps four years of negotiations over the boat's ownership.
NEWS
April 6, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
After graduating from Central High School in Philadelphia, William T. Moore enlisted in the Navy. For two years, he studied at a naval training center on the Navy Pier in Chicago, son Thomas said, while learning to become a carrier-based aircraft machinist. But then he was diagnosed with rheumatic fever, which a Mayo Clinic website states "can cause permanent damage to the heart. " A Navy physician "went to him and his mother, Edith," who had gone to be with her son, "told them he was doomed," and gave him an early discharge "to go home to perish.
NEWS
April 5, 2016
ISSUE | MARCELLUS SHALE Cleaner is better A Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce report says Philadelphia could become an energy hub with construction of a massive natural-gas pipeline and a network of energy-intensive industries along the Delaware River ("Push for natural-gas pipeline grows," Wednesday). Its leaders suggest the pipeline could be supported by public financing. This shortsighted plan is based on a single source of energy. Many energy companies are investing in alternative energy services, which are good for their investors, consumers, and the environment.
REAL_ESTATE
March 6, 2016
One in a continuing series spotlighting real estate markets in the region's communities. When you look at a map of Bucks County, what you first notice about Riegelsville is that it's up there. That's simply a reference to the geography of this quaint little borough on the Delaware River, 63 miles north of Philadelphia but just 10 miles south of Easton. "It's a quiet place," says Frank Dolski, an agent with Coldwell Banker Hearthside Real Estate in Lahaska. "It has a few businesses, an inn, antiques shops, but it is only one square mile, just a tad smaller than Chalfont Borough," which is 1.6 square miles yet has a population nearly six times larger, Dolski says.
NEWS
February 29, 2016
Palmyra Cove Nature Park held its annual fund-raiser, the Frost & Feathers Ball, on Feb. 6 at its Environmental Discovery Center in Palmyra, at the base of the Tacony-Palmyra Bridge. Seventy people attended the gala, which supports the park's educational programs and efforts to preserve its 250 acres of woodlands and wetlands along the Delaware River. South Jersey's largest outdoor classroom provides a setting for environmental education and recreation opportunities for all who visit.
NEWS
February 25, 2016
At a rowdy public meeting Tuesday night, numerous residents spoke out to oppose - and a smaller number to support - a proposal to open a hazardous-waste-treatment plant in Bucks County. The crowd of about 300 shouted, booed, and cheered, repeatedly yelling at one another and at speakers from Elcon, the Israeli company proposing the facility. Critics have raised concerns that the plant - which would be in Falls Township, one mile from the Delaware River - could contaminate the river, a major drinking-water source.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
The project to deepen the Delaware River navigation channel will receive $22 million in the Army Corps of Engineers' current fiscal year work plan and $33 million in President Obama's proposed budget for fiscal year 2017, which begins Oct. 1, according to Sen. Robert P. Casey (D., Pa.). About 80 percent of the channel is now at or deeper than 45 feet, and the dredging work that began in March 2010 should be completed next year, said Ed Voigt, public affairs chief for the Army Corps' Philadelphia District.
BUSINESS
February 7, 2016
Kristina O'Doherty (maiden name Kristina Johnson) knew her family had emigrated from Sweden. But it wasn't until she retired that she found the time to start digging. Cleaning out her parents' house, she discovered that her grandfather had emigrated through Philadelphia. His surname was Johannson, Americanized to Johnson. "It really set me on a course to find out more," she recalls. "I knew my grandparents attended a Swedish Lutheran church in Wilkes-Barre, and that was it. " In 2003, she retired and took a writing class.
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