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Delaware River Basin Commission

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NEWS
September 14, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carol R. Collier, who for 15 years was the executive director of the Delaware River Basin Commission, has announced that she will retire in March. In her announcement during Thursday's commission meeting at Burlington County College in Mount Laurel, Collier said 15 years at the helm was "long enough for the good of the person and the position. " "It was totally my decision," she said later. "I have been thinking about this for a while. "Obviously, the last few years have been a little rougher and uncertain, but that is not what made me make the decision.
NEWS
December 19, 2001 | By Suzette Parmley INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
With three New York reservoirs that feed the Delaware River dipping to record-low levels, the Delaware River Basin Commission declared a drought emergency yesterday for the region. The action allows the commission to order additional water released from lakes and reservoirs so it can flow into the Delaware River, which supplies much of the region's water. The commission, however, did not order the states to impose mandatory restrictions on water use. Pennsylvania and New Jersey now have voluntary restrictions in place, but officials in both states said yesterday that they had no plans to impose any mandatory curbs on water use at this time.
NEWS
January 27, 2000 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Delaware River Basin Commission took a major step yesterday toward limiting the flow of two toxic chemicals into the river. The commission, an interstate agency, directed its staff to come up with a numerical value for the river's "assimilative capacity" for the chemicals - in other words, how much of the substances, both of which are suspected carcinogens, the waterway can absorb and still meet health standards. The commission believes that amount has already been exceeded.
NEWS
April 27, 1997 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In the Little Neshaminy Creek watershed around Warminster, Bucks County, the groundwater is so depleted from overpumping that if it were not for wastewater, on some days the stream would have no water at all. That, water experts say, is not what nature intended. Four years ago, the Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) appointed a committee to develop a kind of water budget for the entire Neshaminy Creek basin as a way to avoid the excess withdrawals of groundwater that lead to low or no freshwater levels in streams.
BUSINESS
May 7, 2010 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Drilling for natural gas in the Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania's easternmost counties has been put on hold for months, if not longer. On Wednesday, the Delaware River Basin Commission voted unanimously to draft new regulations to govern natural gas projects and not to issue any permits until the new rules are in effect. The decision means that even as activity escalates throughout the state - nearly 900 Marcellus permits have been issued this year - no production drilling can be done in the Delaware watershed.
NEWS
July 28, 1988 | By Laura Fortunato, Special to The Inquirer
Improvements to the Chesterdale Waste Treatment Co.'s plant, which serves the Willistown Woods development in Willistown Township and the Chesterdale Farms apartment complex in Westtown Township, will be the subject of a public hearing Wednesday before the Delaware River Basin Commission in West Trenton, N.J. The hearing was announced at the Willistown Township Board of Supervisors' meeting Tuesday. The Delaware River Basin Commission, which must authorize any improvements to sewage treatment plants, will review the application by Chesterdale Waste Treatment to upgrade the plant that serves the two developments.
NEWS
October 21, 1986
Hats off to Ray Proffitt, the self-styled, recently annointed "keeper" of the Delaware River, whose pollution-busting exploits were chronicled by staff writer Michael Capuzzo on Sept. 29. That a shy, 72-year-old man, piloting a 30-year-old German-made amphibious automobile, is single-handedly capturing corporate Goliaths polluting a romantic river is the stuff that legends, and catchy newspaper articles, are made of. And that's my point. I salute him and wish him good hunting.
NEWS
January 20, 1999 | By Mark Jaffe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The rain, sleet and snowstorms that have lashed the Northeast, knotting traffic and felling power lines, have at least had the benefit of staving off a drought emergency in the Philadelphia area. With reservoirs falling to 36 percent of capacity this month, the Delaware River Basin Commission was set to issue an emergency notice as early as next week. The move would have imposed water-use restrictions for homes and businesses across the region. But yesterday Chris Smith, a spokesman for the Delaware River Basin Commission, said that "the target date [for a drought emergency]
NEWS
June 4, 2009
FURTHERMORE ... Protect Delaware River from natural-gas drilling Natural-gas drilling is coming to the Delaware River. Rich natural-gas deposits are expected in the Upper Delaware River Watershed in Pennsylvania's and New York's Marcellus Shale. But this boom has a big price. The extraction methods can, and have, contaminated drinking water, streams, and rivers; destroyed mature forests and ecologically and economically important habitats; and damaged the quality of life in communities where drilling is happening.
NEWS
September 25, 1993 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Weren't those clouds? Wasn't that rain? Hasn't it been damp enough around here most of the past two weeks? Never mind about that. There's a drought warning in effect for the Philadelphia area. Now that the blasting heat of summer is over, people are being asked to stop watering lawns and washing cars. This week's action by the Delaware River Basin Commission isn't as out of sync with reality as it may sound, DRBC spokesman Chris Roberts said. "I can understand why people in Philadelphia are wondering why we are under a drought warning," Roberts said, "but the storage is low. " The Delaware River, which supplies about half of Philly's water, is fed by three large reservoirs in the Adirondacks region of New York state.
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BUSINESS
April 27, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, Staff Writer
The proposed $1.2 billion PennEast Pipeline, which would deliver Marcellus Shale natural gas to New Jersey utilities, was dealt a setback Monday when a regional regulatory agency said it now wants to conduct an independent review of the project. The Delaware River Basin Commission, which last year requested a joint review with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), said Monday that it would conduct its own set of public hearings about the 119-mile pipeline. The DRBC, consisting of the governors of Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey, and Delaware and a federal representative, has been under pressure from pipeline opponents to more rigorously review the project.
NEWS
March 30, 2016
ISSUE | WATER QUALITY PennEast Pipeline would be safe A letter raised misguided concerns about PennEast Pipeline's application to the Delaware River Basin Commission for a water permit and alleged impacts on waterways ("Stop the pipeline," March 10). The pipeline will deliver low-cost, local natural gas to eastern Pennsylvania and New Jersey families and businesses. The letter stated that PennEast "plans . . . to withdraw more than 45 million gallons of water. " This is a one-time withdrawal used to test the pipeline's integrity prior to its going into service.
NEWS
March 11, 2016
ISSUE | WATER QUALITY Stop the pipeline The PennEast Pipeline Co. has applied for a water permit from the Delaware River Basin Commission that would allow its destructive pipeline to run through the region. According to the application, the company plans to discharge or withdraw more than 45 million gallons of water. The 110-mile pipeline would cut through the Delaware River valley, beginning in Pennsylvania and crossing the river and 87 other waterways, including protected waters, into Hopewell Township, N.J. The application process could take up to a year, and, if rejected, the DRBC could help stop the pipeline.
NEWS
December 11, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
The regional government agency responsible for protecting the Delaware River watershed approved a water company's plan to pump from a Chester County well at its meeting Wednesday after the commission addressed many concerns from residents. Residents and environmentalists worry that the water company's plan could dry up their personal wells and damage federally protected streams. Based on some of their suggestions, the Delaware River Basin Commission added safeguards to the plan. Artesian Resources Corp., a water company based in Delaware, has said its pumping will not harm the environment.
NEWS
November 12, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
A regional agency tasked with protecting the Delaware River watershed has added more safeguards to a water company's plan to draw from a Chester County well after dozens of concerned residents and environmentalists raised objections in September. Still, local well owners are pushing for additional changes. Artesian Resources Corp. must have an expanded monitoring program to make sure its plan to pump 200,000 gallons of water per day from a well in New Garden Township does not damage residents' wells or the nearby federally protected White Clay Creek, according to the Delaware River Basin Commission.
NEWS
September 28, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a young girl growing up in Wilmington, Trish Whetham dreamed of owning horses. In 2004, her dream came true. Now 59, Whetham runs Morningstar Stables, a sprawling compound in London Britain Township, Chester County, where she lives with her husband and where she says her two adult daughters learned strong work ethics. Like many of her neighbors in the county's rural southeastern corner - as well as 1.6 million around Philadelphia and South Jersey, and more than 13 million households throughout the country - she and her family use a well for water to drink, to cook, to wash.
NEWS
April 23, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
First you see a roof covered with solar panels. Then the native plants, where the lawn used to be. In the driveway, not far from the canoe, is an electric Chevy Volt. This is Maya van Rossum's house. It's in Bryn Mawr, which is in the Darby Creek watershed. Which drains into the Delaware River. Which van Rossum has adopted as her personal - and professional - mission in life. For two decades as the Delaware riverkeeper, she has championed the 330-mile river and its tributaries, source of drinking water for 15 million people.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Delaware River Basin Commission, the interstate agency that manages water resources in the Delaware watershed, on Monday named utility executive Steven J. Tambini as its next leader. Tambini, 54, the vice president of operations for Pennsylvania American Water, will take over the executive director position on Aug. 1, when Carol R. Collier, who has held the job for 15 years, is retiring. Tambini has over 30 years of experience in water supply engineering and water resource planning, management and operations.
NEWS
March 12, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Delaware River Basin Commission has named a longtime water company official with connections on both sides of the river as its next executive director. Steven J. Tambini, 54, a civil and environmental engineer who lives in Medford, will take over the position on Aug. 1, the commission announced Monday. He will make $120,000 a year. He replaces Carol R. Collier, who is retiring after 15 years with the commission. Tambini has worked in water supply engineering and water resource planning and management for three decades.
NEWS
September 14, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carol R. Collier, who for 15 years was the executive director of the Delaware River Basin Commission, has announced that she will retire in March. In her announcement during Thursday's commission meeting at Burlington County College in Mount Laurel, Collier said 15 years at the helm was "long enough for the good of the person and the position. " "It was totally my decision," she said later. "I have been thinking about this for a while. "Obviously, the last few years have been a little rougher and uncertain, but that is not what made me make the decision.
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