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Delaware River Basin Commission

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NEWS
September 14, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carol R. Collier, who for 15 years was the executive director of the Delaware River Basin Commission, has announced that she will retire in March. In her announcement during Thursday's commission meeting at Burlington County College in Mount Laurel, Collier said 15 years at the helm was "long enough for the good of the person and the position. " "It was totally my decision," she said later. "I have been thinking about this for a while. "Obviously, the last few years have been a little rougher and uncertain, but that is not what made me make the decision.
NEWS
December 19, 2001 | By Suzette Parmley INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
With three New York reservoirs that feed the Delaware River dipping to record-low levels, the Delaware River Basin Commission declared a drought emergency yesterday for the region. The action allows the commission to order additional water released from lakes and reservoirs so it can flow into the Delaware River, which supplies much of the region's water. The commission, however, did not order the states to impose mandatory restrictions on water use. Pennsylvania and New Jersey now have voluntary restrictions in place, but officials in both states said yesterday that they had no plans to impose any mandatory curbs on water use at this time.
NEWS
January 27, 2000 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Delaware River Basin Commission took a major step yesterday toward limiting the flow of two toxic chemicals into the river. The commission, an interstate agency, directed its staff to come up with a numerical value for the river's "assimilative capacity" for the chemicals - in other words, how much of the substances, both of which are suspected carcinogens, the waterway can absorb and still meet health standards. The commission believes that amount has already been exceeded.
NEWS
April 27, 1997 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In the Little Neshaminy Creek watershed around Warminster, Bucks County, the groundwater is so depleted from overpumping that if it were not for wastewater, on some days the stream would have no water at all. That, water experts say, is not what nature intended. Four years ago, the Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) appointed a committee to develop a kind of water budget for the entire Neshaminy Creek basin as a way to avoid the excess withdrawals of groundwater that lead to low or no freshwater levels in streams.
BUSINESS
May 7, 2010 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Drilling for natural gas in the Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania's easternmost counties has been put on hold for months, if not longer. On Wednesday, the Delaware River Basin Commission voted unanimously to draft new regulations to govern natural gas projects and not to issue any permits until the new rules are in effect. The decision means that even as activity escalates throughout the state - nearly 900 Marcellus permits have been issued this year - no production drilling can be done in the Delaware watershed.
NEWS
July 28, 1988 | By Laura Fortunato, Special to The Inquirer
Improvements to the Chesterdale Waste Treatment Co.'s plant, which serves the Willistown Woods development in Willistown Township and the Chesterdale Farms apartment complex in Westtown Township, will be the subject of a public hearing Wednesday before the Delaware River Basin Commission in West Trenton, N.J. The hearing was announced at the Willistown Township Board of Supervisors' meeting Tuesday. The Delaware River Basin Commission, which must authorize any improvements to sewage treatment plants, will review the application by Chesterdale Waste Treatment to upgrade the plant that serves the two developments.
NEWS
October 21, 1986
Hats off to Ray Proffitt, the self-styled, recently annointed "keeper" of the Delaware River, whose pollution-busting exploits were chronicled by staff writer Michael Capuzzo on Sept. 29. That a shy, 72-year-old man, piloting a 30-year-old German-made amphibious automobile, is single-handedly capturing corporate Goliaths polluting a romantic river is the stuff that legends, and catchy newspaper articles, are made of. And that's my point. I salute him and wish him good hunting.
NEWS
January 20, 1999 | By Mark Jaffe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The rain, sleet and snowstorms that have lashed the Northeast, knotting traffic and felling power lines, have at least had the benefit of staving off a drought emergency in the Philadelphia area. With reservoirs falling to 36 percent of capacity this month, the Delaware River Basin Commission was set to issue an emergency notice as early as next week. The move would have imposed water-use restrictions for homes and businesses across the region. But yesterday Chris Smith, a spokesman for the Delaware River Basin Commission, said that "the target date [for a drought emergency]
NEWS
June 4, 2009
FURTHERMORE ... Protect Delaware River from natural-gas drilling Natural-gas drilling is coming to the Delaware River. Rich natural-gas deposits are expected in the Upper Delaware River Watershed in Pennsylvania's and New York's Marcellus Shale. But this boom has a big price. The extraction methods can, and have, contaminated drinking water, streams, and rivers; destroyed mature forests and ecologically and economically important habitats; and damaged the quality of life in communities where drilling is happening.
NEWS
September 25, 1993 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Weren't those clouds? Wasn't that rain? Hasn't it been damp enough around here most of the past two weeks? Never mind about that. There's a drought warning in effect for the Philadelphia area. Now that the blasting heat of summer is over, people are being asked to stop watering lawns and washing cars. This week's action by the Delaware River Basin Commission isn't as out of sync with reality as it may sound, DRBC spokesman Chris Roberts said. "I can understand why people in Philadelphia are wondering why we are under a drought warning," Roberts said, "but the storage is low. " The Delaware River, which supplies about half of Philly's water, is fed by three large reservoirs in the Adirondacks region of New York state.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 23, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
First you see a roof covered with solar panels. Then the native plants, where the lawn used to be. In the driveway, not far from the canoe, is an electric Chevy Volt. This is Maya van Rossum's house. It's in Bryn Mawr, which is in the Darby Creek watershed. Which drains into the Delaware River. Which van Rossum has adopted as her personal - and professional - mission in life. For two decades as the Delaware riverkeeper, she has championed the 330-mile river and its tributaries, source of drinking water for 15 million people.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Delaware River Basin Commission, the interstate agency that manages water resources in the Delaware watershed, on Monday named utility executive Steven J. Tambini as its next leader. Tambini, 54, the vice president of operations for Pennsylvania American Water, will take over the executive director position on Aug. 1, when Carol R. Collier, who has held the job for 15 years, is retiring. Tambini has over 30 years of experience in water supply engineering and water resource planning, management and operations.
NEWS
March 12, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Delaware River Basin Commission has named a longtime water company official with connections on both sides of the river as its next executive director. Steven J. Tambini, 54, a civil and environmental engineer who lives in Medford, will take over the position on Aug. 1, the commission announced Monday. He will make $120,000 a year. He replaces Carol R. Collier, who is retiring after 15 years with the commission. Tambini has worked in water supply engineering and water resource planning and management for three decades.
NEWS
September 14, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carol R. Collier, who for 15 years was the executive director of the Delaware River Basin Commission, has announced that she will retire in March. In her announcement during Thursday's commission meeting at Burlington County College in Mount Laurel, Collier said 15 years at the helm was "long enough for the good of the person and the position. " "It was totally my decision," she said later. "I have been thinking about this for a while. "Obviously, the last few years have been a little rougher and uncertain, but that is not what made me make the decision.
NEWS
July 24, 2013
For most of the five million yearly visitors to the upper Delaware River, the region's natural splendors offer an excellent setting to slow their normally hectic pace. That's enough reason to ease the political pressure to open the region to natural-gas drilling, but there's more. Interstate regulators responsible for safeguarding drinking water for more than 15 million people must resist being stampeded into lifting the three-year-old moratorium on drilling in the Delaware watershed.
NEWS
July 12, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Delaware River Basin Commission can't seem to get away from issues involving natural gas. At its meeting Wednesday, the interstate agency that oversees water issues in the river basin unanimously approved water withdrawals totaling nearly six million gallons for a major interstate pipeline project that would involve tunneling under the Delaware River. It also approved the discharge of water used to pressure-test the pipeline. Opponents, who included residents of Northeast Pennsylvania plus several environmental groups in Pennsylvania and New Jersey, argued against the project, saying that granting permission was premature and that the provisions for protecting the environment were inadequate.
BUSINESS
March 6, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
The financial noose is tightening for the Delaware River Basin Commission, the arbiter of whether natural gas drilling will occur in the watershed. Pennsylvania, which is upset that the commission has yet to authorize drilling, has withheld two quarterly payments to it. A state budget document shows Pennsylvania froze its allocation in January, reducing its payments to the DRBC by 40.7 percent this fiscal year. Meanwhile, New York has steadily shrunk its payments over the last few years, and in its proposed 2013 budget, it will pay about 40 percent of its agreed-upon fair share of the commission's revenue.
NEWS
January 23, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Susquehanna River Basin Commission will reconsider more than 20 water permits it approved for Marcellus Shale gas drillers during a raucous meeting last month that was disrupted by anti-drilling activists. The SRBC said Monday that it will hear new public comment Feb. 16 for water-withdrawal applications it approved in December. Environmental organizations have questioned the validity of the commission's vote, which was conducted hastily after shouting demonstrators interrupted public testimony.
NEWS
November 18, 2011
PHILADELPHIA Council OKs tips bill City Council yesterday passed a bill that will prevent restaurant owners from taking 1 percent to 3 percent of tips paid by credit cards to cover fees charged by credit companies. Councilman James Kenney, who introduced the bill, said the money belongs to waiters who earn the tips. Restaurant mogul Stephen Starr opposed the bill, but did not testify in Council. Council also passed a bill introduced by Kenney that will make police reports of car accidents confidential for 60 days to protect victims, whose names, addresses and phone numbers could be accessed by third parties.
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