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Delaware River

NEWS
April 21, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Police have called off the search for a Bristol man presumed dead after he was thrown from his boat on the Delaware River near Neshaminy State Park on Friday. John J. Poltonowicz, 49, fell overboard when his speedboat hit a wake from a tugboat about 1 p.m. Friday, said Trooper Jeff Flynn of the New Jersey State Police. Troopers from Burlington Marine Station towed the boat back to Neshaminy State Park, where it had launched, and searched for Poltonowicz Friday and Saturday. "At this point they're not going to be conducting any more searches," Flynn said Saturday evening.
NEWS
April 18, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
FLORENCE A woman drove her three teenage children into the Delaware River on Tuesday night in an attempt to kill them, authorities said Wednesday. Joann Smith, 49, of Florence, has been charged with attempted murder and endangering the welfare of children. Around 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Smith veered off West Front Street onto a boat ramp, speeding as she barreled toward the river, police said. The car then plunged into the water. Smith and her children, ages 15, 14, and 13, were rescued after a man helped them out of the water, police said.
NEWS
April 2, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
The once-numerous Atlantic sturgeon, one of the ugliest fish ever to ply the Delaware, is now but a bit player in the river's ecosystem. If it prevails in federal court, though, this odd, ancient leviathan may get some new regulatory muscle. Declared an endangered species in 2012, the sturgeon already has surfaced as a consideration in some of the river's largest development projects, including the current dredging to deepen the channel. Last month, however, two environmental groups filed suit in U.S. District Court against, chiefly, the National Marine Fisheries Service to force it to designate "critical habitat" - river locales where the fish go to feed, reproduce, and seek cover.
NEWS
March 17, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Famous for its $4.95 chocolate bars and high-end lattes, the Lambertville Trading Co. coffee bar had a line snaking out the door in Lambertville, N.J., last week, a short walk east across the Delaware River from New Hope, Bucks County. Just yards away from the coffeehouse on Bridge Street, another line formed outside the Lambertville Food Pantry, where low-income people from both river towns waited to select donated bread, rice, and meat. The disparate queues demonstrate the growing gap between those who live well and those who struggle in this bucolic spot long known as Philadelphia's country getaway place.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Delaware River Basin Commission, the interstate agency that manages water resources in the Delaware watershed, on Monday named utility executive Steven J. Tambini as its next leader. Tambini, 54, the vice president of operations for Pennsylvania American Water, will take over the executive director position on Aug. 1, when Carol R. Collier, who has held the job for 15 years, is retiring. Tambini has over 30 years of experience in water supply engineering and water resource planning, management and operations.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
With more than half of the Delaware River navigation channel now at or deeper than 45 feet, the dredging project that began in March 2010 is on target for completion in 2017. President Obama has proposed $35 million for the deepening of the Delaware in his 2015 fiscal year budget. About $20 million in federal money this year will be spent to deepen, from 40 to 45 feet, a stretch between the Ben Franklin and Walt Whitman Bridges and the southernmost 15 miles in the lower Delaware Bay. The lower channel contains sand, which will be used to build dunes and storm-damage protection at Broadkill Beach, said Ed Voigt, public affairs chief for the Army Corps of Engineers Philadelphia District.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2014 | By Diane Fiske, For The Inquirer
If you ask Peter Shaw why he rebuilt his Bucks County house 100 feet from the Delaware River after it was destroyed by major floods - three times - be prepared to listen to him talk for a very long time. But the bottom line is: Living next to the river is worth it. And after awhile, it becomes clear that Peter, a financial investor, is confident that the latest version of his Tinicum Township house, designed on stilts by an architect and a structural engineer, is now pretty indestructible.
BUSINESS
February 21, 2014 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
In what the proposal's opponents are calling a victory, the company that wants to build a hazardous-waste incinerator in lower Bucks County has put its efforts on hold indefinitely. Allen Toadvine, attorney for the for Route 13 Bristol Partners, said that Bristol Township had asked for more specifics on the potential release of pollutants, but he said that the firm would need to choose a manufacturer for the plant before it could provide those details. The township zoning hearing board was to consider the firm's application for a variance on Monday to build the incinerator, the first step in a years-long approval process that would end with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection.
NEWS
February 18, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
NORTH CAPE MAY - It was a big adventure 50 years ago for a young man like Capt. Billy Ray Phillips to leave the Chesapeake Bay, where he had cut his teeth piloting ferry boats, and embark on a fledgling new enterprise. But as thousands of cheering people lined the shores of two states and hundreds more packed two ferries for the inaugural twin voyages on July 1, 1964, of the Cape May-Lewes Ferry, Phillips, then 29, knew he had made the right choice to come and guide one of the vessels on that 16-mile maiden trip.
NEWS
February 12, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
A body was found Saturday in the Delaware River behind the Adventure Aquarium in Camden. Camden fire crews responded about 4 p.m. after an aquarium employee discovered the body. The body was identified Monday as that of David Opoku, 27. Coast Guard officials said Opoku was wearing a blue jumpsuit. State police officials said he was often around the Camden area and in Trenton. The state police major-crimes unit is investigating. mboren@phillynews.com 856-779-3829 @borenmc
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