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Delaware River

BUSINESS
May 7, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
The City of Philadelphia, Delaware County, and Tinicum Township announced a multimillion-dollar financial settlement Monday in long-simmering tensions between the city-owned Philadelphia International Airport and its municipal neighbors over a massive plan to expand the airport. The tentative agreement, announced by Mayor Nutter, airport CEO Mark Gale, Delaware County Council, Tinicum officials, and U.S. Reps. Patrick Meehan and Robert Brady, includes funding to ensure "continuity of tax revenues" for the Delaware County neighbors.
NEWS
April 29, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
DELANCO A black-and-white aerial photograph of the banks of the Delaware River snapped in 1946 led a judge to conclude much of the "Dunes" area in this tiny community was once underwater and therefore belongs to the state of New Jersey, not the township. The recent ruling by Superior Court Judge Karen L. Suter paves the way for the state to pursue tentative plans to dump tons of dredge spoils on the land, which is now occupied by hiking trails and a small woods. Under state law, tidal waters and the land beneath them are owned by the state, and these claims can date back to the 1940s.
NEWS
April 28, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON When he took office in 2010, Gov. Christie made liberal use of a previously little-employed tool to exercise control over state authorities, including the Delaware River and Bay Authority. Three times in 2010 and 2011, the Republican governor vetoed meeting minutes of the bistate authority, which operates the Delaware Memorial Bridge. Last week, he took out the veto pen again - this time, to nix pay raises for the authority's employees. The action - which officials at the authority said did not come as a surprise - provides an example of how Christie has asserted his powers as governor.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
WEST DEPTFORD There's a small stretch of roadway in Gloucester County that will soon play a big role in what some describe as the biggest economic development project in the county's history. Paradise Road seems appropriately named for the artery that will help link I-295 to the first new port on the Delaware River in decades, in Paulsboro. But for people who currently use the roadway every day, the cratered path is anything but heavenly. "Looks like they were practicing dropping bombs," said an employee at the Gloucester County Utilities Authority, which is situated on the road.
NEWS
April 21, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Police have called off the search for a Bristol man presumed dead after he was thrown from his boat on the Delaware River near Neshaminy State Park on Friday. John J. Poltonowicz, 49, fell overboard when his speedboat hit a wake from a tugboat about 1 p.m. Friday, said Trooper Jeff Flynn of the New Jersey State Police. Troopers from Burlington Marine Station towed the boat back to Neshaminy State Park, where it had launched, and searched for Poltonowicz Friday and Saturday. "At this point they're not going to be conducting any more searches," Flynn said Saturday evening.
NEWS
April 18, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
FLORENCE A woman drove her three teenage children into the Delaware River on Tuesday night in an attempt to kill them, authorities said Wednesday. Joann Smith, 49, of Florence, has been charged with attempted murder and endangering the welfare of children. Around 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Smith veered off West Front Street onto a boat ramp, speeding as she barreled toward the river, police said. The car then plunged into the water. Smith and her children, ages 15, 14, and 13, were rescued after a man helped them out of the water, police said.
NEWS
April 2, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
The once-numerous Atlantic sturgeon, one of the ugliest fish ever to ply the Delaware, is now but a bit player in the river's ecosystem. If it prevails in federal court, though, this odd, ancient leviathan may get some new regulatory muscle. Declared an endangered species in 2012, the sturgeon already has surfaced as a consideration in some of the river's largest development projects, including the current dredging to deepen the channel. Last month, however, two environmental groups filed suit in U.S. District Court against, chiefly, the National Marine Fisheries Service to force it to designate "critical habitat" - river locales where the fish go to feed, reproduce, and seek cover.
NEWS
March 17, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Famous for its $4.95 chocolate bars and high-end lattes, the Lambertville Trading Co. coffee bar had a line snaking out the door in Lambertville, N.J., last week, a short walk east across the Delaware River from New Hope, Bucks County. Just yards away from the coffeehouse on Bridge Street, another line formed outside the Lambertville Food Pantry, where low-income people from both river towns waited to select donated bread, rice, and meat. The disparate queues demonstrate the growing gap between those who live well and those who struggle in this bucolic spot long known as Philadelphia's country getaway place.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Delaware River Basin Commission, the interstate agency that manages water resources in the Delaware watershed, on Monday named utility executive Steven J. Tambini as its next leader. Tambini, 54, the vice president of operations for Pennsylvania American Water, will take over the executive director position on Aug. 1, when Carol R. Collier, who has held the job for 15 years, is retiring. Tambini has over 30 years of experience in water supply engineering and water resource planning, management and operations.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
With more than half of the Delaware River navigation channel now at or deeper than 45 feet, the dredging project that began in March 2010 is on target for completion in 2017. President Obama has proposed $35 million for the deepening of the Delaware in his 2015 fiscal year budget. About $20 million in federal money this year will be spent to deepen, from 40 to 45 feet, a stretch between the Ben Franklin and Walt Whitman Bridges and the southernmost 15 miles in the lower Delaware Bay. The lower channel contains sand, which will be used to build dunes and storm-damage protection at Broadkill Beach, said Ed Voigt, public affairs chief for the Army Corps of Engineers Philadelphia District.
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