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Delaware River

BUSINESS
May 2, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Government planners fanned out along Spring Garden Street on Thursday to consider replacing its median with a bicycle pathway. Armed with clipboards and checklists, the federal, state, and local planners were taking the first step toward creating an $8 million, 2.2-mile-long "Spring Garden Greenway" that would connect to paths along the Schuylkill and the Delaware River. Thursday's assessment "will really help to lift this project and give it momentum," said Patrick Starr, executive vice president of the Pennsylvania Environmental Council, which is seeking a $900,000 grant from the state to advance the project.
NEWS
April 24, 2015 | By Kelly Flynn, Inquirer Staff Writer
Residents of two Florence Township houses along the Delaware River were urged to leave, their homes declared unsafe to occupy Wednesday, after a landslide took away a large part of their backyards. The picturesque waterfront yards were steadily eroded over the last two years, apparently destabilized in part by an overflowing storm drain, according to Township Administrator Richard Brook. The backyards collapsed on Monday. Thomas Sahol, assistant administrator in the township, inspected the erosion Wednesday afternoon.
NEWS
April 6, 2015 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two dozen members of the Riverton Yacht Club filed through the tall metal gate early Saturday morning and lumbered groggily toward the clubhouse. They could hardly hear one another's hellos over the wind's ragged breath, whitecaps slapping rocks, and plastic tarps complaining loudly, trying to break loose from the bungee cords strapping them to boats in dry dock. On either side of the pier, where the small but mighty sailing club has made its home for 150 years, the last stubborn patches of sooty snow had finally receded, leaving a crusty coating of moss crosshatched with broken tree twigs on the banks of the Delaware River.
NEWS
March 31, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Hessians were out for blood that autumn day in 1777. They marched 10 miles from Haddonfield to Red Bank, hoping to surprise the American defenders of Fort Mercer on the Delaware River. Instead, they fell into a trap. Many of Britain's German allies passed over the abandoned earthen walls topped with pointed logs, and then cheered, thinking they'd breached the fort and were close to victory. On the other side, though, was another wall - and a deadly hail of artillery and musket fire that cut through their ranks like a scythe.
NEWS
March 22, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Delaware River and Bay Authority, which operates the Delaware Memorial Bridge and the Cape May-Lewes ferry, has named Vincent P. Meconi of Wilmington chief operations officer. Meconi is a former secretary of the Delaware Departments of Administrative Services and Health and Social Services. He had also been deputy chief administrative officer for New Castle County, and he served a term in the state legislature in the 1980s. Meconi will oversee operations of the bridge and ferry, as well as five regional airports in Delaware and South Jersey.
NEWS
March 12, 2015 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Coast Guard is investigating an oil spill on the Delaware River near Pennsville, Salem County, N.J., authorities said Tuesday. Authorities were notified after globs of oil began washing ashore at the Pennsville boat ramp near Riviera Drive and Eaton Road. Police reports said there was a strong odor of oil. Neither the source of the oil nor the amount possibly spilled have been determined, said John Hammond, an operations specialist first class with the Coast Guard in Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
February 20, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Peco Energy Co. will inspect more than 39,000 utility poles throughout Bucks and Philadelphia Counties this year as part of the company's ongoing preventive maintenance program. Inspections include a visual examination of poles and the attached equipment, taking samples from the interior of poles and excavating around the base to check for decay. Any necessary repairs and replacements would then be performed. Peco maintains 390,000 poles across the region and each is inspected every 10 years.
NEWS
February 18, 2015 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
The region has just shivered through two of the most punishing cold days of the winter. And it is about to get colder. And snowier. Temperatures climbed into the teens Monday afternoon, but the searing winds kept windchill factors in the single digits after 36 consecutive hours at or below zero. Fueled by powerful northwest gusts, the Arctic conditions helped knock out power to 13,000 Peco customers, stall more than 1,500 cars, close Archdiocese of Philadelphia schools in the city, and plunge the Delaware River to its lowest level in 22 years.
NEWS
February 2, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Odette's was once the gateway to New Hope, a lively cabaret bar on the edge of town that for decades epitomized the ebullient spirit of the famously gay-friendly borough. But lately, it's been an eyesore. After being ravaged by floods in 2008, the historic building along the Delaware River has sat vacant with boarded-up windows. A group of local investors is planning to change that. In about two months, they say, work will begin on the Riverhouse at Odette's, a $25 million facility that will bring luxury hotel rooms, a banquet hall, restaurant, and rooftop bar to the 40,000-square-foot property.
BUSINESS
January 31, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cargoes were up 16 percent in 2014 in the Port of Philadelphia, the fifth consecutive year for gains and a sign of an improving economy, officials said. More steel, more paper, more automobiles, and more imports arriving in 20-foot and 40-foot containers accounted for the increase. Total tonnage was 5.9 million. Not everything was up, as sugar, fresh fruit, and so-called project cargo, which is large, odd-size pieces of equipment such as boilers and generators, were down. Cocoa-bean shipments appeared to decline, but only because of a change in how the bean cargoes were shipped, port officials said.
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