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Delaware

NEWS
April 27, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
A DELAWARE Chancery Court judge ordered late yesterday that Interstate General Media, the parent company of the Daily News , the Inquirer and Philly.com, should be dissolved and sold in a private "English-style" auction. Vice Chancellor Donald F. Parsons Jr.'s decision backs the plan proposed by IGM co-owner George E. Norcross III. Parsons ordered the minimum bid be set at $77 million in cash. It must be held no later than May 28. The private auction is limited to the company's co-owners Norcross and Lewis Katz, who both want to dissolve the company because they are unable to agree on IGM's governance.
NEWS
April 23, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
First you see a roof covered with solar panels. Then the native plants, where the lawn used to be. In the driveway, not far from the canoe, is an electric Chevy Volt. This is Maya van Rossum's house. It's in Bryn Mawr, which is in the Darby Creek watershed. Which drains into the Delaware River. Which van Rossum has adopted as her personal - and professional - mission in life. For two decades as the Delaware riverkeeper, she has championed the 330-mile river and its tributaries, source of drinking water for 15 million people.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Many people in Philadelphia don't know that there's a park at Penn's Landing Marina, hugging the Delaware River between Spruce and Dock Streets - and they definitely don't make a point of going there. That may change June 27 with the opening of Spruce Street Harbor Park, the most ambitious and expensive pop-up yet to transform a forgotten Philadelphia space into a destination. With three barges holding a floating restaurant and giant hammocks cantilevered over the water - plus mini art galleries, a water garden, a walkway of misting arches, and a slew of places to play games, buy snacks, or nap in a lounge chair - it will cost upward of $700,000.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delaware Attorney General Beau Biden has announced the indictment of suspended lawyer Michael Kwasnik on charges of theft, securities fraud and sale of unregistered securities, the latest in a string of law enforcement and regulatory actions against him. Kwasnik, of Marlton, pleaded guilty to New Jersey money laundering charges a year ago in connection with the theft of $1.1 million from a 96-year-old Cherry Hill widow, whose investment accounts he...
NEWS
April 2, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
The once-numerous Atlantic sturgeon, one of the ugliest fish ever to ply the Delaware, is now but a bit player in the river's ecosystem. If it prevails in federal court, though, this odd, ancient leviathan may get some new regulatory muscle. Declared an endangered species in 2012, the sturgeon already has surfaced as a consideration in some of the river's largest development projects, including the current dredging to deepen the channel. Last month, however, two environmental groups filed suit in U.S. District Court against, chiefly, the National Marine Fisheries Service to force it to designate "critical habitat" - river locales where the fish go to feed, reproduce, and seek cover.
NEWS
March 29, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Delaware Art Museum is planning to sell as many as four unnamed paintings to cover $20 million in old construction debt and replenish its endowment funds, the museum said Wednesday. "After detailed analysis, heavy scrutiny, and the exhaustion of every reasonable alternative to relieve our bond debt, the trustees had two agonizing choices in front of them - to either sell works of art or to close our doors," museum chief executive Mike Miller said in a statement. "While today's decision is certainly hard to bear, the closure of this 100-year-old museum would be, by comparison, unbearable.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Philadelphia spent the last decade working out a single, knotty planning problem: How should the old industrial spaces on the Delaware waterfront evolve? The consensus was that vacant land would be developed to resemble the rest of the city, with walkable streets, a mix of uses, and lively ground floors. No one was naive enough to think such projects could be realized without parking garages, but the expectation was that the structures would not dominate the river. It's a shame the conversation was never extended to the city's other riverfront, the Schuylkill, which has come alive since a trail park pushed into Center City.
SPORTS
March 18, 2014 | By Paul Tierney, For The Inquirer
The room fell silent. Everyone knew that Delaware's name would pop up on the television screen eventually, but through each commercial break, the blue-and-yellow-clad fans packed inside the Carpenter Sports Building for the Blue Hens' selection-show viewing party stayed on the edge of their seats. The crowd let out a collective sigh of relief as Delaware (25-9), the Colonial Athletic Association champion, avoided a matchup with Louisville. But when the No. 13 Blue Hens saw their name appear under fourth-seeded Michigan State (26-8)
SPORTS
March 18, 2014 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
BRETT BROWN insisted after Saturday night's 103-77 loss to the Memphis Grizzlies that this is not "slit-your-wrist time. " But following the Sixers' 20th consecutive loss, 16 straight at home and 30th in the past 33 games, it sort of has to be hair-pulling-out time a little bit, no? Before becoming a coach, Brown was in the sales business. He has been doing a lot of that this season, insisting that wins no longer matter and that the important thing is to develop the young players and find some unknown ones who may be worthy of keeping around as the organization moves forward next season.
NEWS
March 13, 2014 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
DOWNE TOWNSHIP, N.J. - The phone in the shed on Money Island often rings before the sun rises, before the blackbirds sing and the watermen and their oyster boats grumble to life with diesel fuel and coffee. The callers, mostly recreational fishermen and boaters, are looking for Bruce Muenker, who manages a marina where the Nantuxent Creek meets the Delaware Bay. They hope he'll peek out of his trailer or glance outside the shed that serves fresh bait and gourmet coffee. They seek flat water and sunny skies - and Muenker, ever the optimist, is pretty good at luring them in, no matter what he sees.
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