CollectionsDelicatessen
IN THE NEWS

Delicatessen

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 11, 1986 | By Paul Scicchitano, Special to The Inquirer
The Warminster Township Zoning Board has cleared the way for a township businessman to install tables in his delicatessen. The board voted 2-0 at its Tuesday night meeting to allow Ralph Falcone to install tables in his Roma Italian Deli, 446 W. Street Rd. Board chairman Daniel Heppard and board member Stanley Allen voted for the request. Board member Robert Hodgkinson was absent. The board limited the number of tables to four, with seating for not more than 16. The board also said Falcone could not have waiters or waitresses.
NEWS
April 20, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
Allan Domb has purchased the 19-story office building at 1525 Locust St. for $17 million, the real estate investor and City Councilman said. Domb said Monday that he closed on the purchase of the 90,000-square-foot building from Equity Commonwealth, a Chicago-based real estate trust, on April 14. The building is fully leased by tenants such as law firm Kline & Specter and Ceisler Media & Issue Advocacy. Domb had already owned the smaller adjacent office building at 1521 Locust St. that accommodates Schlesinger's Delicatessen on its ground floor.
NEWS
January 26, 1991 | By Peter Landry, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 17-year-old delicatessen worker was shot and killed in a Fairhill shopping plaza last night when up to nine men burst into three stores and held them up in rapid succession, police said. A clerk was handcuffed to keep her out of the way in a pharmacy, and shots were fired in a delicatessen and a Thriftway supermarket that were crowded with shoppers. The robberies began about 6:50 p.m. when the holdup men burst into a pharmacy attached to the Thriftway at Third Street and Lehigh Avenue, handcuffed a woman behind the counter and rifled the cash register, police said.
NEWS
May 8, 1987 | By John Jennings and Lee Pasternack, Special to The Inquirer
A Yardville man was arrested Wednesday in connection with last month's shooting of a delicatessen worker in Bordentown Township. An officer from the Burlington County Prosecutor's Office arrested Thomas E. Forsythe, 25, of the 100 block of Lakeside Boulevard, at 11 p.m. as Forsythe was walking across the parking lot of the Ivy Tavern on South Broad Street in Hamilton Township, Burlington County Prosecutor Steve Raymond said. Forsythe was arraigned yesterday on charges of assault, attempted murder and robbery before Superior Court Judge Paul R. Kramer in Burlington County, who set bail at $250,000.
NEWS
April 16, 1989 | By Rita M. Sutter, Special to The Inquirer
Amid neighborhood concern, a Mount Holly delicatessen owner has withdrawn his application for an additional pinball machine. Before nearby residents could urge the Township Council to reject the application Monday, Alfred Ireland, who owns Aldee's Deli at Cherry and Garden Streets, said he would withdraw his request. He also offered to remove two video games and a pinball machine already in his store. Council members told Ireland that he didn't have to take such a step - that he could negotiate with the neighbors - but on Wednesday he decided to close the game room.
NEWS
January 28, 1987 | Special to the Daily News by Mark Ludak
Terence McCracken Jr. greets his girlfriend, Maria Tumolo, outside the Delaware County Courthouse in Media yesterday. He was freed on $60,000 bail yesterday. Last week he won a new trial after serving 45 months in jail for a killing he says he did not commit. McCracken, 22, was convicted in October 1983 of second-degree murder in the death of a customer shot in a 1983 holdup of a Collingdale delicatessen. McCracken was granted a new trial on the basis of statements that another man confessed to the crime in talks with McCracken's lawyer and prison inmates.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1992 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Delicatessen, the happily warped, haywire first feature from French filmmakers Jean-Pierre Jeunet and Marc Caro, is a blissful reminder of just how far the medium of movies can take you: It can take you anywhere. A darker-than-dark comedy about love and cannibalism, Delicatessen is a screwball synthesis of Buster Keaton's silent classics, Terry Gilliam's Brazil, the ricocheting artistry of animator Tex Avery, the arch, cinematic brashness of the Coen brothers and the freak-show atmosphere of David Lynch.
NEWS
July 13, 1986 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
The operator of a Crescentville delicatessen exchanged gunfire yesterday with a hold-up man who ran from the store with money and cigarettes but was captured later hiding in a nearby garage, police said. Stephen Kotzen, 44, who operates Steve's Deli in the 6000 block of Tabor Avenue, was alone in the store about 9:15 a.m. when a gunman walked in and announced a hold-up, police said. After forcing Kotzen into a rear closet and pulling a telephone cord out of the wall, the gunman fled with $1,798 in cash and some cigarettes, police said.
NEWS
July 3, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
HERBERT Ginensky had this thing about vinegar. The health-giving and curative powers of this simple ingredient, known to every cook, were taken to extremes by this man who often let his imagination run away with him. He insisted you could take vinegar internally and externally. Try bathing your feet in it. And, oh yes, dark chocolate was in the same salubrious category. And Herbert was not shy about promoting both. He passed out photocopied brochures extolling their benefits.
NEWS
February 17, 1994 | By John Way Jennings, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The owner of a Pemberton Township delicatessen was critically stabbed 10 times during a robbery at his store late Tuesday night. Authorities said Ashwin K. Parmar, 41, of Mount Laurel, was flown by Medevac helicopter Southstar to Cooper Hospital-University Medical Center. Detective Sgt. Jack Smith, a spokesman for Burlington County Prosecutor Stephen G. Raymond, said Parmar, the owner of the Village Deli on Magnolia Road, underwent surgery after he had been stabbed numerous times in the neck, chest, back and thigh.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 20, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
Allan Domb has purchased the 19-story office building at 1525 Locust St. for $17 million, the real estate investor and City Councilman said. Domb said Monday that he closed on the purchase of the 90,000-square-foot building from Equity Commonwealth, a Chicago-based real estate trust, on April 14. The building is fully leased by tenants such as law firm Kline & Specter and Ceisler Media & Issue Advocacy. Domb had already owned the smaller adjacent office building at 1521 Locust St. that accommodates Schlesinger's Delicatessen on its ground floor.
NEWS
July 3, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
HERBERT Ginensky had this thing about vinegar. The health-giving and curative powers of this simple ingredient, known to every cook, were taken to extremes by this man who often let his imagination run away with him. He insisted you could take vinegar internally and externally. Try bathing your feet in it. And, oh yes, dark chocolate was in the same salubrious category. And Herbert was not shy about promoting both. He passed out photocopied brochures extolling their benefits.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2010 | By LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
Much of my workweek is in Old City and I always enjoyed the occasional lunch trip to Kibbitz in the City. The snappy, if not demanding, service and overstuffed deli sandwiches were reminiscent of work lunches in Manhattan. So, when Michael Spector took over the Kibbitz location after it closed and opened Delicatessen in February, I was curious. There was much "kibitzing" on the street that had to be confirmed or denied. The vibe is definitely younger and moving to what Spector calls Modern Jewish.
NEWS
September 18, 2005 | Inquirer suburban staff
What it is: A cheery restaurant with country charm in Swarthmore. What we like about it: The large, hearty sandwiches filled with oven-roasted turkey, roast beef or pork seasoned and roasted on the premises, and served on crusty Portuguese bread with a cookie on the side. Even the iced tea with a large slice of orange is delicious. The menu boasts more than 70 tempting sandwiches that bear names familiar to this college town. Try the Rutgers - oven-roasted turkey breast, lettuce, tomato and honey Dijon mustard on rustic bread ($6.49)
NEWS
November 17, 2002 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The average neighborhood deli is notorious for having a get-them-in, move-them-out mentality. With traffic flow guided by rope stands, you feel a bit like cattle lining up for grub - or garlicky pickled meat on rye, as the case may be. At Hymie's Merion Delicatessen & Restaurant, which has been at 342 Montgomery Ave. in Merion since 1956, that attitude is taken one step further. The Main Line institution, which many credit with introducing a lot of suburbanites to Jewish deli food, also has a reputation as a place where everyone seems to be tolerating a case of indigestion.
NEWS
May 24, 1997 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Starting with a sale today featuring watercolors and an unusual stained-glass delicatessen window, Memorial Day weekend will again feature a large number of sales taking advantage of the holiday, most of them in the country. The delicatessen window will be offered by Justin Time Auction at a sale beginning at 10 a.m. at a fitting location for such an item: The banquet hall of the Starting Gate Lounge in Paulsboro. Fourteen feet long and dating from the 1920s, the window advertises the "Modern Lunch" in cobalt letters.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1996 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
When Birrett Luthrak, who is from India, decided to open a restaurant, he found that Jonathan's, a kosher, Israeli-style restaurant on 11th Street in Center City, was for sale. "I just decided that this was the restaurant," Luthrak said. "It was strictly a sound business decision. " That was six months ago. Luthrak changed the name to King David, and, while he kept the menu pretty much intact, the place was no longer kosher. But that would change. "Many people kept coming and told me the restaurant had been kosher for five years and that they missed it. So I changed it back," said Luthrak, who explained that his great grandfather, who emigrated to India from Russia, was Jewish.
FOOD
June 5, 1996 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Virtually every food market offers some form of take-out these days, and consumers have come to rely on prepared foods from deli counters and salad bars for quick meals. It's one of the growing conveniences that has helped trim more than two hours of meal preparation from the average homemaker's day over the course of this century. But for all the take-out food available, few stores of any size prepare on site all of the ready-to-eat dishes they now offer. Instead, most turn to outside manufacturers to supply at least some items, especially salads.
NEWS
January 20, 1996 | By Larry Lewis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A South Jersey delicatessen operator was sentenced yesterday to 55 years in prison for a 10-hour rampage against two women on the streets of Pennsauken more than five years ago. Pennsauken native Frank M. Vergilio, 40, must serve at least 15 years of the sentence handed down by Camden County Superior Court Judge Linda G. Rosenzweig. She gave him the maximum sentences for kidnapping and aggravated assault. Vergilio originally was convicted in 1991 of attacking two women and a 15-year-old girl in 1990.
NEWS
March 6, 1995 | By Howard Goodman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Chris Panaritis, 68, of Upper Darby, founder and owner of the Ariston Delicatessen, a familiar fixture of the 69th Street business area in Upper Darby, died Thursday at home of a heart attack. Mr. Panaritis was known as a hard worker, and his friendliness helped make his store a local landmark. "It was a place where I went to every morning," said J. Kevin McCreesh, an accountant with an office nearby. "And he always had something wonderful to say. " Mr. Panaritis was born in Greece and was orphaned at an early age. He fought in the Greek army against communist forces toward the end of World War II. After the war, he revived his father's old grocery store in his hometown of Pireas, supporting his brother and two sisters.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|