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Delta Air Lines

NEWS
July 21, 2011 | By Linda Loyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
US Airways Group Inc. and Delta Air Lines got the green light from regulators Thursday to swap some takeoff and landing rights at New York's LaGuardia and Washington's Reagan National Airports. At Reagan, US Airways - the dominant carrier in Philadelphia - will acquire 42 Delta slots, which translate into round-trip flights, along with international rights to fly to Sao Paulo, Brazil, in 2015. Delta will also pay $66.5 million to US Airways. In return, Delta will get 132 slots at LaGuardia, currently used by US Airways Express flights, to increase its presence in New York, where it already has a hub at John F. Kennedy International Airport.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2012 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hoping a fourth try will be the charm in its effort to tie the knot with another carrier, US Airways Group Inc. is said to be analyzing a possible bid to acquire bankrupt American Airlines. Although a bid is far from certain, and likely months away, Delta Air Lines and private-equity firm TPG Capital Group also are looking at American, according to published reports. US Airways has hired Millstein & Co. to examine American, and Delta has hired the Blackstone Group, the Wall Street Journal reported earlier this month.
NEWS
June 3, 2011 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
US Airways Group Inc. and Delta Air Lines have again asked regulators for permission to swap some takeoff and landing rights at New York's LaGuardia and Washington's Reagan National Airports. US Airways would get 42 Delta slots, which translate into round-trip flights, at Reagan; international rights to fly to Sao Paulo, Brazil, in 2015; and $66.5 million in cash. In return, Delta would get 132 slots at LaGuardia, currently used by US Airways Express flights, to increase its presence in New York, where it already has a hub at John F. Kennedy International Airport.
NEWS
April 17, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Delta Airlines bid to buy the idled ConocoPhillips refinery in Trainer to satisfy its enormous thirst for jet fuel appears to be gaining momentum, according to industry observers. According to reports, the Delta board of directors has endorsed a plan to bid on the refinery, one of three Philadelphia fuel-processing facilities that face closure because of poor profits. Two others are owned by Sunoco Inc. of Philadelphia, which is exiting the refining business this year altogether.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2012 | Inquirer Staff Report
IN THE REGION Retailer's shares fall on sales news Shares in Destination Maternity Corp. fell 19.6 percent Tuesday on news that the Philadelphia apparel retailer had notched lower-than-expected sales during the quarter ended June 30. Net sales of $138.8 million were below the low end of sales guidance of $142 million to $147 million issued on April 26. The same quarter a year earlier, sales were $146.7 million. The company issued new earnings guidance of 51 cents to 53 cents per share for the quarter, down from 57 cents to 70 cents forecast in April.
NEWS
July 17, 1987 | By Carl M. Cannon, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Until a month ago, Delta Air Lines enjoyed a national reputation, both inside the aviation industry and with the flying public, as a safe and efficiently operated company. Then the nightmare began. Although no lives have been lost, Delta pilots in five separate incidents have strayed off course and nearly hit another plane, landed at a wrong airport, landed on a wrong runway, nearly taken off into another airplane and almost dumped a loaded Boeing 767 into the sea by inadvertently shutting off its engines.
NEWS
September 6, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Who knew that the economic solution for the region's beleaguered oil refineries would arrive on a slow train from North Dakota? Delta Air Lines, the new owner of the Trainer refinery that is scheduled to reopen later this month, on Thursday became the third fuel producer in the Philadelphia area to announce plans to bring in crude oil by rail from the Bakken oil field in the upper Midwest. Edward Bastian, the airline's president, told an investor conference in New York that Delta plans to replace some imported oil at Trainer with domestic crude brought in by rail.
NEWS
August 1, 2003 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In an unusual settlement, the federal Transportation Security Administration has agreed to apologize to a passenger and change training policies after federal air marshals arrested the man in Philadelphia last year. The agency, accused of racial profiling, also agreed to pay $50,000 to the passenger, Bob Rajcoomar, under a settlement disclosed yesterday of his lawsuit stemming from the arrest aboard Delta Air Lines Flight 442. Experts in federal law and the Transportation Security Administration's history called the settlement an extraordinary admission by the agency and a highly unusual disclosure under federal tort law. "They're basically saying, 'You caught us,' " said Andrew Thomas, a private security analyst who closely follows the agency.
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